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AUDITORY ORAL COMMUNICATION SYLLABUS

Team: Diane Heller Klein, Team Leader

Barbara Hecht, John Tracy Clinic

Marilyn Sass-Lehrer, Gallaudet University

Karen Stein, Moog Oral School

Sam Slike, Bloomsburg University

Purpose:

     This syllabus is designed in response to the growing need for incorporating technology into all areas of instruction in higher education. The syllabus team recognizes that many components are involved in the development of auditory oral communication skills. There is not any one single course that can comprehensively develop the competencies required by teacher trainees. Auditory Oral Communication has both traditional and innovative components. While speech scientists continue to refine our knowledge about all aspects of auditory oral communication, practitioners conscientiously attempt to utilize the current best practices possible in the development of cogent and functional auditory oral communication skills for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

     With this in mind, the intent of this syllabus is to provide teacher educators with a series of suggestions, or a menu of choices if you will, regarding the content of courses whose focus is auditory oral communication skills. In addition, it is hoped that this syllabus will provide a technologies compendium which will allow the individual instructor to augment instruction in each of these areas in a comfortable and technologically efficient and effective manner.

The Auditory Oral Communication Syllabus is comprised of the following parts:

Current Council on Education of the Deaf Curriculum Components

     The following Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Curriculum Components were relevant for the Auditory Oral Communication Syllabus. They are listed in the same numerical order as in the CEC-CED Curriculum Component Accreditation documentation.

    2 - Models, theories, and philosophies (e.g. bilingual-bicultural, total communication, oral/aural) that provide the basis for educational practice(s) for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, as consistent with program philosophy.

  7 - Apply understanding of theory, philosophy and models of practice to the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  8 - Articulate pros and cons of current issues and trends in special education and the field of education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  10 - Communication features (visual, spatial, tactile, and/or auditory) salient to the learner who is deaf or hard of hearing that are necessary to enhance cognitive, emotional, and social development.

  13 - Various etiologies of hearing loss that can result in additional sensory, motor, and/or learning differences in students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  15 - Effects that onset of hearing loss, age of identification, and provision of services have on the development of the child who is deaf or hard of hearing.

  16 - Impact of early comprehensible communication on the development of the child who is deaf or hard of hearing.

  18 - The differences in quality and quantity of incidental language/learning experiences that children who are deaf or hard of hearing may experience.

  20 - Specialized terminology used in the assessment or children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  24 - Administer appropriate assessment tools utilizing the natural/native/preferred language o f the student who is deaf or hard of hearing.

  25 - Gather and analyze communication samples from students who are deaf or hard of hearing, including nonverbal as well as linguistic acts.

  26 - Use exceptionality-specific assessment instruments (e.g. SAT-HI, TERA-DHH, FSST) appropriate for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  29 - The procedures and technologies required to educate students who are deaf or hard of hearing under one or more of the existing modes or philosophies (consistent with program philosophy)

  31 - Current theories of how languages (e.g. ASL and English) develop in both children who are hearing and those who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  33- Ways to facilitate cognitive and communicative development in students who are deaf or hard of hearing (e.g. visual saliency) consistent with program philosophy.

  34 - Techniques of stimulation and utilization of residual hearing in students who are deaf or hard of hearing consistent with program philosophy.

  36 - Demonstrates proficiency in the language(s) the beginning teacher will use to instruct students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  37 - Demonstrates the basic characteristics of various existing communication modes used with students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  38 - Select, design, produce, and utilize media, materials, and resources required to educate students who are deaf or hard of hearing under one or more of the existing modes or philosophies (e.g. bilingual-bicultural, total communication, aural/oral)

  39 - Infuse speech skills into academic areas as consistent with the mode or philosophy espoused and the ability of the student who is deaf or hard of hearing.

  40 - Modify the instructional process and classroom environment to meet the physical, cognitive, cultural, and communicative needs of the child who is deaf or hard of hearing (e.g. teacher’s style, acoustic environment, availability of support services, availability of appropriate technologies)

  41 - Facilitate independent communication behavior in children who are Deaf or hard of hearing

  43 - Demonstrate the ability to modify incidental language experiences top fit the visual and other sensory needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  47 - Manage assistive/augmentative devices appropriate for students who are deaf or hard of hearing in learning environments.

  49 - Design a classroom environment that maximizes opportunities for visually oriented and/or auditory learning in students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

  62 - Consumer and professional organizations, publications, and journals relevant to the field of education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

Following a course or series of courses in Auditory Oral Communication for Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing persons, the teacher candidates will be able to:

Spoken Language
 
Auditory Oral Communication Outcomes
CED Curriculum Components

See pages 2-3

Technology Enhanced strategies and applications
  1. demonstrate understanding of the
difference between communication, language, and speech and identify the interrelated impact each component has on the other
2, 7, 8, 15, 18, 31, 33, 37
  • Web Course Tools
    • Threaded discussions
    • Chatroom
  • PowerPoint presentations
  • DVD presentations
  1. demonstrate understanding of normal spoken language development
15, 18, 31, 37
  • Multimedia presentations
  1. demonstrate understanding of and discuss the impact of hearing loss on spoken language development
2, 10, 15, 16, 18, 31, 33, 37, 40
  • WebQuests
  • Cyber Pen Pals
  • Hearing loss simulations
  1. demonstrate understanding of and explain the benefits and requirements of developing spoken language
16, 18,31, 33, 40
  • Distance Learning (audio/video) exchanges
  • Cyber Tutors
  • Cyber Pen Pals
  1. evaluate comprehension and production of spoken language formally and informally
20, 24, 25, 26 
  • Computer managed assessment and language sample analysis tools (SALT)
  1. develop an appropriate plan based on the evaluation results
29, 33, 38, 40
  • Computer assisted Productivity programs
  1. demonstrate understanding of the basic principles of and use the appropriate techniques for teaching spoken language to deaf and hard-of-hearing children

 

2, 10, 18, 29, 33, 38, 40, 41, 43
  • WebQuests
  • Chatrooms
  • Listservs
  • PowerPoint
  1. incorporate the development of spoken language into programs utilizing various communication philosophies (aural-oral, simcom, bi-bi)
2, 8, 15, 18, 29, 33, 38, 40, 41, 43
  • Cyber Mentors
  • Distance Learning (audio/video) exchanges
  1. promote the development of spoken language in various settings
2, 8, 16, 18, 29, 33, 38, 40, 41, 43
  • Personal/Program Web Page development 
  • Audio Journals
  • TTY

Additional Competencies/Applications/Activities

Speech Production
 
Auditory Oral Communication

Outcomes

CED Curriculum

Components

See pages 2-3

Technology Enhanced

Strategies and

Applications

1. identify and describe the

anatomy and physiology

involved in speech

production

10, 37
  • PowerPoint
  • WebQuests
  • DVD
2. identify and describe the

acoustic parameters

associated with the

reception and production of

speech

10, 15, 16, 18, 37
  • SmartBoard with video applications
  • PowerPoint
  • Speech Viewer
3. demonstrate

understanding of the

segmental and 

suprasegmental 

characteristics of speech

10, 16, 18
  • CD-ROM 
  • CD-ROM burner
  • Ling videos
4. knowledge of formal and informal speech assessment tools
18, 20, 24, 25, 26
  • Distance observation activities
  • Computer managed assessment tools
  • Ling Videos
5 demonstrate the ability to

use orthographic systems

representative of English

sounds {receptively and

expressively} (IPA,

Northampton, Alcorn,Yale)

10, 20, 2425, 26
  • Web Course Tools
    • White Board applications
  • SmartBoard interactive writing tools
  1. evaluate the overall 
intelligibility of speech

samples 

16, 18, 20, 24, 25, 26
  • DVD
  • CD-ROM
  • Videotape
  • Audiotape
  1. compare and contrast the methodologies [auditory, visual, tactile, kinesthetic] used in the development of speech skills (Ling, Auditory Oral, Auditory-Verbal, Multi-Sensory, Association Phoneme, Verbo-Tonal, Cued Speech)

 

2, 7, 8
  • Web Course Tools
    • Chat room
    • Threaded discussion
    • Bulletin board assignments
  • PowerPoint
  1. develop speech lessonsto meet individual student needs 
38, 39, 40
  • Computer enhanced instructional materials
    • Disks
    • CD-ROMs
  • Web-based lesson plan search
  • WebQuest
  1. work collaboratively with parents and other professionals (e.g. SLP, audiologist) to establish a communicative environment facilitating carryover, generalization, and maintenance of speech production skills for all developmental/age levels (i.e. parent-infant, preschool, primary, intermediate, high school, and post school levels) 
2, 16, 18, 38, 39, 40, 41
  • Cyber Mentors
  • Chat Rooms
  • Listserves
  • Professional interactive Web Page
  • Cyber Speech Pals
  1. compare and contrast
auditory v. visual speech

reception

8, 10, 49
  • PowerPoint
  • Threaded discussions
Additional Competencies/ Applications/Activities Aural Development and Speech Perception
 
Auditory Oral Communication

Outcomes

CED Curriculum

Competencies

See pages 2-3

Technology Enhanced

Strategies and applications

1. identify and describe the

anatomy and physiology

involved in hearing

10, 15, 37
  • Web searches
  • PowerPoint
  • CD-Rom
  • DVD
2. explain the impact various

audiological, 

environmental ,and 

medical factors have on

the reception, perception,

and production of speech

2, 10, 13, 15, 16, 18, 34, 37, 40, 49
  • WebQuest
  • Web Course Tools
    • Threaded discussions
    • Chat room
  • Cyber Mentors
3. evaluate auditory skills

(threshold testing, speech

audiometry, functional 

listening skills)

 

20, 24, 25, 26
  • video
4 .facilitate a child’s

understanding and use of 

auditory input (auditory 

skill development)

10, 18, 34, 38, 40, 41
  • Computer based instructional programs
5. identify and explain the

function and use of all

types of hearing aids

[traditional and

transpositional], auditory

skill development 

equipment, and 

cochlear implants

2, 10, 15, 20, 34, 38, 40, 47
  • Web searches
  • WebQuest
  • Video
  • PowerPoint
  • Internet Simulations
  1. troubleshoot listening devices
20, 34, 38, 47 
 
7. conduct the Ling 6 sound

test for auditory 

detection,discrimination,

identification, and

comprehension responses

7, 20
  • Video
8 .plan and implement 

auditory skill 

development activities

integrated within all 

classroom curricular

areas

18, 34, 38, 40
  • Computer based instructional programs
  • Web search for lesson plans
  • Instructional Web Page
9. demonstrate 

understanding of

synthetic and

analytic approaches to

speechreading and Cued

Speech 

2, 7, 8, 10, 18, 20
  • CD-ROM
  • PowerPoint
  • Web Course Tools
  • Smart Board
10. plan and implement  speechreading lessons that relate functionally to

a student’s environment

 

16, 18, 38, 40, 49
  • CD-ROM 
  • CD-ROM burner
  • Digital cameras, videos
  • Computer based software
  • WebQuest
  • Web search for plans

Additional Competencies/Applications/Activities


Technological Instructional Enhancements:

Skills, materials, and competencies required to utilize the following technological classroom tools:

The following list of tools will be helpful in the implementation of any of the listed syllabus applications:
    1. Overhead projectors and transparencies
    2. VCR/videos
    1. SmartBoard or other large screen projection equipment
    2. Digital cameras and videos
    3. Captioning software and equipment
    4. Computer Applications:
      1. PowerPoint presentations
      2. CD-ROM and DVD
      3. use of WWW to locate information and publish lessons
      4. use of e-mail to correct lesson plans
      5. CD-ROM applications for Speechreading, speech production, Cued Speech
      6. CD-ROM burners to create own instructional products
      7. Use of database and spreadsheet applications for course management or student management
      8. Desktop publishing applications for instructional materials and lessons
      9. Assessment applications- scoring and normative interpreting of results
      10. Create a www homepage with topic specific reference links
      11. E-mail/communication buddies---use of video applications for real-time interactions between students at university and students in classrooms
      12. Cyber mentors
      13. WebQuests
    5. IBM Speech Viewer and Visi-Pitch equipment
    6. Scanners- increase availability of materials for upload
    7. WebCT- Top Class – School Room In-A-Box (or other on-line distance education course tool package)
    1. Speech-to-Print Technology
    2. Speech Recognition Technology
*************************************************

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Websites

GENERAL SITES

Deaf Ed. Website

http://www.deafed.net

Alexander Graham Bell Association of the Deaf

http://www.agbell.org/

Gallaudet University

http://www.gallaudet.edu

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

http://www.ntid.edu

Listen-Up

http://www.listen-up.org/index.htm

DeafNation News

http://www.deafnation.com

National Organization of the Deaf

http://www.nad.org

Boystown

http://www.boystown.org/chlc/

League for the Hard of Hearing

http://www.lhh.org/index.htm

American Society for Deaf Children

http://deafchildren.org/

Parents of Hearing Impaired Children-Our Stories

http://www.hoppefamily.com/parents.html

BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc.

http://www.beginningssvcs.com

SPOKEN LANGUAGE
Auditory-Verbal International

http://www.auditory-verbal.org/

John Tracy Clinic

http://www.johntracyclinic.org/

Central Institute for the Deaf

http://www.cid.wustl.edu/

Clarke School for the Deaf

http://www.clarkeschool.org/

St. Joseph’s Institute

http://www.stjosephinstitute.org/

Oral Deaf Education

http://www.oraldeafed.org

ERIC Article Database

http://ericec.org/digests/prodfly.html

BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc.

http://www.beginningssvcs.com


SPEECH PERCEPTION
 

League for the Hard of Hearing

http://www.lhh.org/ct/index.htm ct/index.htm

BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc.

http://www.beginningssvcs.com


AUDIOLOGY AND ANATOMY

BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc.

http://www.beginningssvcs.com


SPEECH PRODUCTION

League for the Hard of Hearing

http://www.lhh.org/ct/index.htm

BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc.

http://www.beginningssvcs.com


AUDITORY SKILL DEVELOPMENT

League for the Hard of Hearing

http://www.lhh.org/ct/index.htm

BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc.

http://www.beginningssvcs.com


SPEECHREADING

Bloomsburg University

http://www.bloomu.edu/speechreading/speechreading.html

League for the Hard of Hearing

http://www.lhh.org/ct/index.htm

BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc.

http://www.beginningssvcs.com


CUED SPEECH:

Cued Speech

http://web7.mit.edu/CuedSpeech/

Cued Speech.Com and Cued Speech.Net

http://www.cuedspeech.com/

About.Com

http://deafness.tqn.com/health/deafness/msubcued.htm

Deaf Ed. Website

http://www.deafed.net/activities/980227b.htm

Gaining Cued Speech Proficiency- A Manual for Parents, Teachers, and Clinicians

http://www.uri.edu/comm_service/cued_speech/

Cued Speech FAQs

http://www.zak.co.il/deaf-info/old/cued_speech.html