(4/20/2000 - submitted by the "Language Team" - Leader: Susan Easterbrooks – Georgia State University, GA:     Members: Sharon Baker – University of Tulsa, OK; David Conway – University of Nebraska at Omaha, NE; Tony Martin – Lamar University, TX; & Amy Otis-Wilburn – University of Wisconsin, WI) Unit Theme: (Your College NCATE Theme Goes Here) Program Theme: (Your Program's NCATE Theme Goes Here)

Department of (Your Department's Name Goes Here)

(Your College or University Name Here)

Language Development for Students who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (Course Prefix and # Go Here)
 

INSTRUCTOR: Your Name

Office #

e-mail address

phone

Office Hours:

Class time: Room:

PREREQUISITE: (Might include a course in normal language development, a course in ASL and English syntax, or other courses your program designates.)

TEXTS:
 

OTHER RECOMMENDED READINGS:
 
 

COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:

(Description from your college or university catalog.)


CEC/CED Knowledge and Skills Standards:

(Note: Attached grid relates standards to projects, activities, technology, and indicators.)

#10- Communication features (visual, spatial, tactile, and/or auditory) salient to the learner who is Deaf/Hard of Hearing which are necessary to enhance cognitive, emotional and social development.

#16- Impact of early comprehensible communication on the development of the child who is D/HH.

#18- The difference in quality and quantity of incidental language/learning experiences which D/HH children may experience.

#19- Effects of sensory input on development of language and cognition of children who are D/HH.

#24- Administer appropriate assessment tools utilizing the natural/native/preferred language of the student who is D/HH.

#25- Gather and analyze communication samples from students who are D/HH, including non-verbal as well as linguistic acts.

#28- Components of the non-linguistic and linguistic communication which students who are D/HH use.

#30- Information related to ASL and existing communication modes used by students who are D/HH.

#31- Current theories of how languages (ASL and English) develop in children who are hearing and who are D/HH.

#33- Ways to facilitate cognitive and communicative development in students who are D/HH (e.g., visual saliency) consistent with program philosophy.

#35- Research-supported instructional strategies and practices for teaching students who are D/HH.

#36- Demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) the beginning teacher will use to instruct students who are D/HH.

#38- Select, design, produce, and utilize media, materials, and resources required to educate students who are D/HH under one or more of the existing modes or philosophies (e.g., bilingual-bicultural, total communication, aural/oral).

#40- Modify instructional process and classroom environment to meet the physical, cognitive, cultural, and communication needs of the child who is D/HH (e.g., teacher's style, acoustic environment, availability of support services, availability of appropriate technologies).

#41- Facilitate independent communication behavior in children who are D/HH.

#42- Apply first and second language teaching strategies (e.g., English through ASL or ESL) appropriate to the needs of the individual student who is D/HH and consistent with program philosophy.

#43- Demonstrate ability to modify incidental language experiences to fit the visual and other sensory needs of children who are D/HH

#47- Manage assistive/augmentative devices appropriate for students who are D/HH in learning environments.

#53- Prepare students who are D/HH in the appropriate use of interpreters

#56- Effects of communication on the development of family relationships and strategies used to facilitate communication in families with children who are D/HH.

#59- Facilitate communication between the child who is D/HH and his family/caregivers.

#60- Facilitate coordination of support personnel (e.g., interpreters) to meet the diverse communication needs of the student who is D/HH and/or primary caregivers.

Note: See attachments delineating performance indicators related to the CEC/CED standards.

COURSE CONTENT:

I Language Development Approaches

II. Assessment, Data-Collection and Record-Keeping

III. Accommodations

IV. Materials and Resources

VI. Technology

VII. Collaboration

COURSE REQUIREMENTS and EVALUATIONS
1. Mid-term and Final Exam 20% each (Content covers projects 4 & 5) 40%
2. Integrated Projects (These projects are designed to promote complex reasoning and problem-solving.)
Project 1: Developing accommodations for the unique language/communication needs of DHH students in an integrated academic setting/classroom. 20%

Project 2: Developing data collection and analysis strategies to assess the language and communication of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, establishing present level of performance, and identifying language goals and objectives for Individual Education Plans. 20%
Project 3: Collaborating with colleagues to solve the unique communication needs of a child with special communication challenges. 20%

In addition, students will engage in the following Integrated Projects during their student teaching semester: Project 4: Documenting effectiveness of instruction through growth and change in a student's language/communication over time to assist in ongoing decision-making in language support and instruction.

Project 5: Developing and implementing instructional plans across the curriculum for students who are DHH that meet Individualized Educational Plan goals and objectives.

ATTENDANCE POLICY
1. Regular attendance at all scheduled classes is expected. Participation in class activities impacts on your grade.

2. Make up quizzes and activities must be arranged by the student before the next regularly scheduled class meeting. To miss a test or collaborative activity is highly discouraged.

3. Failure to read assigned materials before class and/or failure to participate in discussion due to this will adversely affect your grade. Participation is an essential element of this course.

4. You are responsible for ALL activities whether present or not such as acquiring handouts, viewing videotapes, taking quizzes, collaboration, etc.

5. If you experience any problem in this course, please feel free to make an appointment with me to discuss solutions.

POLICY ON ACADEMIC HONESTY
Students are responsible for and are urged to read carefully the College of Education policy on academic honesty covering plagiarism, cheating, unauthorized collaboration, falsification, and multiple submissions in the COE Bulletin.
GRADING
Grading will follow these guidelines:

A Excellent Grade of 90 or above

B Good Grade of 80 to 89

C Average Grade of 70 to 79

F Failure Grade below 60

I Incomplete: AThe grade of >I= may be given to a student who for non-academic reasons beyond his or her control is unable to meet the full requirements of a course: (College of Education Graduate Bulletin) . Students in the College of Education must earn a B or must retake the course.

LIABILITY
Students are required to obtain tort liability insurance prior to any field experience.
OTHER
Note: The course syllabus provides a general plan for the course; deviations may be necessary.

Note: Pursuant to the provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, it is the responsibility of the instructor to make reasonable accommodations for students who have disabilities. If you have any condition that influences your ability to learn or to participate in class activities, it is YOUR responsibility to register your needs prior to the beginning of classes through the Office of Disability Services and to inform the instructor so that reasonable accommodations may be made.

Integrated Projects that Utilize Technology as a Tool for Assessment, Planning, and Instruction
in Language Development for Students who are D/HH

     An "Integrated Project" is field-based and provides a vehicle for students to demonstrate their ability to perform tasks typically required of teachers of students who are D/HH in school-based programs. Tasks require an integration of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected of beginning teachers of D/HH students (CED).
 
Integrated Project
Associated Activities
Possible Technology Applications
Indicators Addressed
Developing accommodations for the unique language/ communication needs of D/HH students in an integrated academic setting/classroom · Students will identify captioned materials that support the topic and/or unit of instruction in the regular classroom

· Students will identify notetaking needs of D/HH students 

· Students will design test-taking accommodations that may be needed.

· Students will identify language and concepts in texts and other materials that may be difficult and develop strategies to teach and reinforce understanding in D/HH students

· Students will prepare visual/graphic organizers for D/HH students summarizing material covered in the regular classroom 

· Students will design a co-planning process to include the regular education teacher and, where appropriate, speech language pathologist, audiologist and other educational professionals.

· Students will develop an inservice for regular educators to assist in creating classroom contexts that support auditory and visual access and participant structures for D/HH students (examples include use of ALD’s, CI’s, managing classroom noise, use of interpreters, cooperative learning, and other technological support to D/HH students).

· Inspiration or Pagemaker software

· Captioned films

· Interactive web-sites for student reinforcement, extension of learning, and for gathering information

· PowerPoint for presentation

· Technology to assist in Project-Based assessment or alternative assessments

· Word processing to develop supportive instructional materials

· Computer assisted Notetaking (CART, CAN)

- Web Buddies

· Do I reinforce and purposefully link language teaching and learning across reading, writing, speaking, signing, and watching/listening? (CED #33)

· Do I use visual patterns and representations to organize and clarify complex concepts? (CED #19, 33)

· Do I support students by developing ways to represent concepts visually/graphically? (CED #19, 33)

· Can I work with general education teachers to adapt instructional strategies in the regular classroom setting so that students who are D/HH are meaningful participants?(CED-#33)

· Do I account for the mismatch between a D/HH student’s language/cognitive skills and the language/cognitive demants of a given activity, event, or context? (19)

· Can I identify sources of media, materials to support a listening/learning environment? (38)

· Do I modify the classroom setting to create good listening environments? (41, 44)

· Can I identify support services needed to educate D/HH students in the regular classroom? (33, 40)

· Can I work effectively with special education staff, including educational interpreters, speech and language, regular education teachers, educational assistants to effectively plan and provide flexible and responsive services to D/HH students? (53)

· Can I teach students who are D/HH to use interpreters appropriately? (53)

* Do I use accurate vocabulary that links specific concepts with students' knowledge of more general one? (33)

 

       

 
 
 
 
 
 
Integrated Project
Associated Activities
Possible Technology Applications
Indicators Addressed
Developing data collection and analysis strategies to 
  1. assess the language/ communication of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, 
  2. establishing present level of performance, and 
  3. c) identifying language goals and objectives for Individual Education Plans
 
· Students will use a variety of strategies to collect language/ communication samples from students who are D/HH (e.g., natural conversations, prompted elicitations, guided discussions, etc.) 

· Students will analyze language/communication samples as well as face-to-face productions using a variety of language analysis strategies techniques and frameworks

· Students will design language sampling/collection/observation schemes to gather information on the language/communication of students who are D/HH in collaboration with regular classroom teachers (and other educational professionals) 

· Students will advocate and design instructional approaches to meet the needs of individual students who are D/HH based upon results from language assessment

· Students will identify annual IEP language learning goals and objectives, for individual students who are D/HH based upon results from language assessment

· Computer-based language analysis software (e.g., Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts – SALT)

· Spreadsheets/data bases for storing information (e.g., Excel, MS Works, Access)

· Audio and video to collect language/ communication samples
 
 

 

· Can I use language analysis rubrics/strategies for analyzing language productions of students who are deaf or hard of hearing? (CED-#25)

· Do I know how to administer and select appropriate formal assessment tools to help identify a student’s strengths and areas of need? (26)

· Can I administer and meaningfully interpret results from a variety of standardized tests designed for students who are D/HH? (CED# 24)

· Can I develop appropriate accommodations so that students can participate meaningfully in local, state, and national assessments? (24)

· Can I administer and meaningfully interpret results from a variety of standardized tests designed for students who are D/HH? (26)

· Can I develop systematic ways of measuring and documenting students’ performance (language/communication) using a variety of informal strategies and tools? (CED-#25)

· Can I describe the various linguistic characteristics and strategies that a student uses in communication? (30)

· Can I use the results of language analyses to create units and lessons for building the communication and language skills of students who are D/HH? (CED-#33)

· Can I use the results from the language analyses to develop appropriate IEP goals and benchmarks (or objectives)? (CED-#25)

· Do I use my knowledge of the full range of the sign language continuum, from ASL to English, to interpret D/HH students’ communication? (28)

* Can I state/list developmental milestones of communication (ASL and English)? (16)

* Do I challenge assessment practices that are unfair and/or culturally biased? (24)

* Do I know my students well academically,socioculturally, linguistically and personally?(30)

Integrated Project
Associated Activities
Possible Technology Applications
Indicators Addressed
Documenting effectiveness of instruction by monitoring the in a student’s language/ communication over time - to assist in ongoing decision-making in language support and instruction · Student will use and develop various language assessment tools to monitor D/HH students’ language growth

· Student will select, teach, and document student performance over time for specified language target using appropriate techniques and technologies

· Student will evaluate his/her decisions regarding the use of various communication modes/languages based upon ongoing documentation of student performance/learning 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

· Use of software to document D/HH students’ language/ communication and construct electronic portfolios

· Video and audio tapes

· Digital cameras

· Spreadsheets and other graphic software to develop forms for documenting language/ communication performance (Word processing programs, Pagemaker, etc.)

*Web Buddies for on-line dialogue journals.

*Kid Pix

· Can I develop systematic ways of measuring and documenting students' language/communication using a variety of informal strategies and tools?(25)

· Can I productively use a variety of informal assessments such as portfolios, rubrics, and checklists to inform instruction and document student achievement? (24)

· Do I have a manageable way to chart students’ progress in meaningful language/communication targets? (CED-#25)

· Can I work with general education teachers and other professionals to create a system of data collection, analysis, storage, and retrieval for tracking the language/communication progress of students who are deaf/hard of hearing. (CED-#25)

· Can I identity students' patterns of language development and support these with documentation of what the student knows and can do? (16)

· Do I use my knowledge of the full range of the sign language continuum, from ASL to English, to interpret D/HH students’ communication? (28)

· Do I monitor language and communication within the context of a student’s development of content knowledge across the curriculum? (40)

· Do I make purposeful decisions regarding my own communication—signing and/or oral—based upon students' language and communication goals? (10)

· Do I make sure that students have access to a conceptually accurate communication as well as forms of Standard American English? (16)


 
 
Integrated Project
Associated Activities
Possible Technology Applications
Indicators Addressed
Developing and implementing instructional plans across the curriculum for students who are D/HH that meet Individualized Educational Program goals and objectives. · Students will plan and prepare sequential instructional activities that correspond to the language goals and objectives

· Students will plan instructional units and prepare lesson plans at various levels to address language/ communication goals and objectives that meet the needs of students who are D/HH including those with multiple disabilities

· Students will develop and implement units and lessons that integrate language/communication goals and objectives into the school curriculum

·Students will identify materials that support the language learning of students who are D/HH

· Students will identify and incorporate appropriate visual and/or auditory strategies to accommodate specific language learning needs of D/HH students.

 

·Use of the Internet to access state’s on-line regular education curriculum

· Use of instructional software that specifically addresses goals and objectives (e.g., Schoolhouse Rock)

· Do I use my knowledge of language development, including the development of ASL, to identify meaningful instructional approaches? (31)

· Do I use my knowledge of language development, including the development of ASL, to identify meaningful learning targets? (31)

· Do I use sequential milestones in preparing and planning instruction? (16)

· Do I use my knowledge of language development and scope and sequence to plan for formal and informal instruction?(42)

· Do I consistently link vocabulary/language concepts to appropriate forms including fingerspelling, signs, speech, and print? (19, 33)

· Can I contextualize my language instruction (including semantics and syntax) within meaningful forms of discourse? (36)

· Do I take advantage of teachable moments for incidental/language learning routinely? (18, 43)

· Do I create instructional contexts that provide students access to academic and social interactions? (18)

· Do I support students in developing ways to represent concepts visually/graphically? (19)

· Do I use my knowledge of the full range of the sign language continuum, from ASL to English, to interpret D/HH students’ communication? (28)

· Do I implement specialized instructional strategies and resources to address the unique needs of D/HH students? (35)

· In my curriculum planning, do I rely on state-of-the-art curriculum approaches and materials? (35)

· Do I choose and use materials and media that will assist in bridging between verbal concepts and visual understanding? (38)

· Do I use multiple approaches in helping students understand language concepts? (40)

· Do I use my knowledge of first and second language instruction to provide meaningful language lessons? (42)

Collaborating with colleagues and families to address the unique communication needs of students with who are D/HH · Creates a process for maintaining consistent communication with educational professionals regarding student’s needs and progress.

· Establishes home-school connections by developing a system for communication with parent(s)/family.

· Consults with outside expert regarding individual needs of student and potential supports for developing student’s language/communication (e.g., state’s augmentative communication, university connections).

· Assists in the development of an approach, service, or material to meet the student’s language/communication needs.
 
 
 
 

 

· Teleconferencing

· E-mail

· Communication software (e.g., Boardmaker, Gus)

· Augmentative communication devices 

* Web buddies

*Can I work with educational interpreters to enhance their efforts in providing robust cognitive and linguistic representations of instruction in the regular classroom? (18)

Can I articulate my personal philosophy for developing language and communication in students who are DHH? (38)

Do I emphasize a student's flexibility in communication by providing multiple opportunities for purposeful communication with a variety of audiences (deaf and hearing; familiar and unfamiliar). 41,59

Do I know a process for assessing a student's need for assistive/augmentative communication technology? 47

Am I able to construct an appropriate augmentative communication system? 47

Can/do I work collaboratively with other professionals (SLPs, teachers, administrators, etc) to design and implement appropriate augmentative/assistive communication systems? 47

Can I work effectively with special education staff, including educational interpreters, speech and language personnel, regular education teachers, educational assistants to effectively plan and provide flexible and responsive services to DHH students? 53

Can I teach students who are DHH to use interpreters appropriately? 53

Do I use strategies to involve parents and others that reveal a genuine interest in a partnership and collaboration in support of DHH students? 56, 59

Do I have specific strategies for involving parents/guardians and the student in developing language/communication goals and objectives? 56

Do I have a style or manner that invites parents and students to work collaboratively? 56

Do I advocate for inclusion of appropriate support personnel in IEP meetings? 60

Websites for Language

(It is always risky listing web addresses. As they pass from one format to the next, they may change. If you cannot contact the site listed, try ending the address at the dot com, dot net, or dot org level, then find the source through the home page.)

http://www.col-ed.org/cur/lang/lang86.txt

http://www.col-ed.org/cur/lang/lang83.txt

http://www.funbrain.com/grammar/index.html

http://www.quia.com/custom/365flas.html

/227main.html

http://www.english.uiuc.edu/cws.wworkshop/writer_resources/grammar_handbook/grammar_handbook.htm

http://www.edu4kids.com/index.php?page=15

http://www.arts.uottawa.ca/writcent/hypergrammar/grammar.html

http://www.EnchantedLearning.com

http://library.advanced.org

http://www.magickeys.com

http://www.pbs.org/rogers/Rhouse/picpic.htm

http://www.teachers.net/lessons/posts/293.html

http://www.primaryresources.com./uk/english/homophones.htm

http://idea.uoregon.edu/~ncite/documents/techrep/tech02.html (specifically addresses DHH)

CDs for Language
Language Explorer- Nordic Software

Sequencing Fun- Sunburst

My First Amazing Incredible Dictionary 2.0- DK Multimedia

Clarisworks- Claris Corporation

Inspiration 6 Software Inspiration Software, Inc.

www.inspiration.com
Laureate Learning Co
www.laureatelearning.com Simple Sentence Structure

Early Emerging Rules

Swim, Swam, Swum

Micro-LADS Set of 7 CDs of Grammar

Edmark Corp

www.edmark.com Imagination Express Destination Series Castle

Rain Forest

Ocean

Neighborhood

Pyramids

Time Trip USA

Stanley's Sticker Stories
Videotapes

Linguistics of American Sign Language

WGBH Enhanced Arthur

ASL/Signed English Videos

Gallaudet's Shared Reading Material