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Telecoil??? Loops in Schools

Key words: Information, Technologies for Deaf/HH

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  • Subject: telecoil??? loops in schools
  • From: Jeanne Shaw jshaw@CLN.ETC.BC.CA
  • Date: Mon, 3 Apr 1995 19:32:53 -0700
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • There is a way of hooking up telephone wire to an amp to make a loop. We do this at our Hard of Hearing Association meetings. Has anyone tried this in a school gym so that the assemblies (in the mainstream school) are accessible to hard of hearing kids through their T-switch as long as they are inside the loop? We have been trying to make it work in the high school gym but unsuccessfully--if we can make it work, the whole system is only about $300 if the school already has an amp. Ideas on what we are doing wrong? Should I post this to beyond-hearing?

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  • Subject: Re: telecoil??? loops in schools
  • From: Churchfields High School Hearing-impaired xuegxal@CSV.WARWICK.AC.UK
  • Date: Tue, 4 Apr 1995 14:09:20 +0100
  • In-Reply-To: <no.id> from "Jeanne Shaw" at Apr 3, 95 07:32:53 pm
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Hi,

    We have been using loop systems for some time. Many public buildings and theatres have had them installed.

    We discontinued their use in our classrooms because of 'crossover' problems. The youngsters were 'hearing' what was going on in adjacent rooms and got totally confused.

    If you already have an amp to drive the loop then the number of 'circuits' of ordinary two ply cable should be around three, but connected to the amp in parallel not series.

    You can buy complete systems including the amp, which can also be connected to other PX systems.

    The other alternative is to use Radio Aid systems that have variable frequency channels such as the Zenhiesser. Then the youngsters all tune into the same frequency as the transmitter which is being used by the person conducting the assembly.

    Hope this helps a little.

    Colin Hughes
    Head of H.I. Unit
    West Bromwich
    England

    Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major