Spreadsheet Ideas

Key words: Curriculum Materials, General Information

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Date: Thu, 13 Jun 1996 03:36:34 EDT

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Cathy Brandt

Subject: Spreadsheet Ideas

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi folks,

On Friday - guess that's tomorrow - ALREADY I am doing a six hour training on how to use Microsoft Works Spreadsheets. I have the agenda and activities outlined. However, they seem rather cut and dried. Anyone want to share an idea or two with me on ways you have used Spreadsheets instructionally?

The training all occurs within a lab and each person has a computer. The training I typically do is comprised of short 15 - 20 minute mini lessons and then chunks of independent time to work on activities which I have provided (with step by step instructions on HOW to create). Thought I'd tap this resource for a possible few more activities.

Today (Thurs) we are doing Word Processing. Got that one covered already. They are bringing disks with them onto which to save their work. They will be creating letters, supply lists and worksheets for the first week of school.

Is everyone out of school yet? This is my first full week out. :)

Cathy - teacher who is enjoying the change of pace

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Date: Thu, 13 Jun 1996 08:57:32 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Candace Krepel

Subject: Re: Spreadsheet Ideas

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <960613.034443.EDT.CBRAN00@ukcc.uky.edu>

Not being a teacher, I have not used spreadsheets instructionally. However, from my personal experience using a variety of computer programs, I have found that the best way to learn a program is to use it. I have never taken a class to learn a program, but consider myself proficient in the use of my favorite spreadsheet, word processing, statistics, and graphics programs. I have "taught" my children to use spreadsheets, though. They learned to use them to organize and graph data for their science projects. Once they learned how to access the menu, and got an idea of how to do things, they were off and running. I would suggest doing the same with your students. You could incorporate spreadsheet and word processing into their science project. They could use larger font size to print up the paper for display on a poster. They could experiment with different graph styles to best display their data. They could...well, you get the idea.

Candy Krepel

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Date: Thu, 13 Jun 1996 09:55:32 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: brenda schick

Subject: Re: Spreadsheet Ideas

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: from "Candace Krepel" at Jun 13, 96 08:57:32 am

I have taught lots of students various types of software. I agree with Candace that the students have to use it. In addition, I think that the problems that they solve with it have to be real. That is, working through a tutorial is good, but sometimes it does too much work for you.

I think learning how to apply the software to your own problem is best.

Also, for software instruction, individual learning is necessary. All of us have sat in front of a computer and watched someone hit keys. It is impossible to learn that way. Students need to manipulate the software on their own.

At UNL, we have classrooms with the teacher's computer projected on the screen and each student has their own computer. It's heaven.

Brenda

************
Brenda Schick, Ph.D.
Director - Deaf Education
University of Nebraska - Lincoln
bschick@unlinfo.unl.edu

************

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Date: Thu, 13 Jun 1996 16:31:24 EDT

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Cathy Brandt

Subject: Re: Spreadsheet Ideas

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: Message of Thu, 13 Jun 1996 08:57:32 -0500 from

On Thu, 13 Jun 1996 08:57:32 -0500 Candace Krepel said:

>Not being a teacher, I have not used spreadsheets instructionally.

If you are a mom - you ARE a teacher! :)

>However, from my personal experience using a variety of computer programs, I have found that the best way to learn a program is to use it.

You and me both. I typically only do inservices and trainings which are hands on lab sessions where I know the presenter's style and know it will fit my learning style = Play, Learn, Do

>suggest doing the same with your students. You could incorporate spreadsheet and word processing into their science project. They could

Yup, great! I am doing an inservice for elementary teachers. It is a six hour inservice in a lab. Each participant does have their own computer on which to work.

Today I did basic Word Processing. Evaluations were very positive. This group was a group of beginners yet very eager to learn. So, we had to start with HOW TO POSITION AND CLICK THE MOUSE. Some COULD do this but didn't really know much else. So, it was all of the basics of how to delete text, correct errors, align text, change style and size etc.

But, by the end of the day most of them had saved Parent Letters and Supply Lists to their disks which they will take and print when school begins. They also learned about Works Wizards and other neat features of Microsoft Works.

Teaching adults is often HARDER than teaching kids. It's tougher to tell them to please be quiet and pay attention. :} It's amazing how they then have 10 questions later because they weren't listening when we were actually doing it step by step together.

The best part of the day - according to evals - was the amount of time they had to sit and work on their own using the handouts, cheat sheets and guides given.

Now tomorrow - SPREADSHEETS - I just would love to have one or two more activities to type up. Thanks, Ted for sharing yours. I'm printing it and taking it with me to TRAFFIC SCHOOL tonight.

Cathy - teacher who will be the student tonight

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Date: Thu, 13 Jun 1996 16:40:53 EDT

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Cathy Brandt

Subject: Re: Spreadsheet Ideas

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: Message of Thu, 13 Jun 1996 09:55:32 -0500 from

There is also a tool called Presenter Plus that allows you to connect the computer to a television/monitor. This is what I used today. However, I do prefer using an LCD or a projection device with a large screen. But, the lab has recently been moved to this room and the blinds aren't available for the windows yet. So, projection devices were out for today and Presenter Plus was in.

Cathy

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Date: Thu, 13 Jun 1996 15:14:51 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Ted McDonald

Subject: Spreadsheet Information

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi Cathy

Some Spreadsheet ideas

An interesting idea I got from The Computing Teacher a few years ago concerned a MAGIC SQUARE.

1. You can program a 3 x 3 magic square by using the formulas so that a student can put in the numbers and see the results immediately. That way they don't have to write and then erase. Put the addition formulas in the cells around the out side of the magic square. These will add all the columns and all the rows. When finished to make it a little fancier you can goto the draw portion and draw lines to outline the squares.

2. Another idea we have used in the high school for Computer Science and for Math is to set up pay problems on the spreadsheet. First calulate Gross Pay ie number of hours per week times hourly rate of pay. The next step could be calculate Gross Pay with overtime. Then calculate Net Pay subtracting the Deductions from the Gross Pay. This model can get very elaborate as you add functions.

Column Headings

No. Hours worked/ rate of pay/ Gross Pay/ Total Deductions/ Net Pay

3. One idea we found that was fun was to go out to the street and count all the cars and trucks going past for a 15 or 20 minute time period. Bring all the info back and use the graphing function to plot your results. You can use different combinations of cars, trucks, vans, half tons, 4 wheel drives, and colours.

4. A final thing we do if the HS students are interested in sports is to set up a hockey pool or a baseball pool on the spreadsheet. Most of our local newspapers run a pool during the sport season and ask readers to send in their choices. Then usually every week they publish the results. We use that information to set up the pool and keep track of the results. Right now we are just finishing a hockey playoff pool that was set up for the staff at our school.

One year we set up a pool within our computer science class. At the same time we had made email contact with the Newfoundland School for the Deaf and invited some of them to join our pool. Every week we sent them the results and once in a while we would have prize day. We would send them funny prizes through land mail. That stimulated some interest and conversation between the students at each school.

However, you must be careful to be seen as NOT gambling as pools and things like that might be against the law or school policy for the students.

Hope these ideas are what you are looking for and can help you. I doubt you will have time to work on them tomorrow but maybe they will be something people could do in the future.

Ted McDonald
Teacher SJW School for the Deaf
Belleville Ontario

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Date: Fri, 14 Jun 1996 14:55:56 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: "Dorothy G. Hesson 904 823-4340"

Subject: Re: Spreadsheet Information

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <199606131914.PAA08068@connect.reach.net>

Hi Cathy,

Spreadsheet ideas --

How about doubling, tripling or otherwise increasing recipes

Statistics for sporting events

Calculating mileage, cost per mile, mileage per gallon for trips

Budgeting

Party planner -- cost per item, amount needed per person -> total cost

There is an excellent spreadsheet program for classroom use. It is called "the Cruncher" and it is published by Davidson Company. The program costs about $59 and is available for both Mac and Windows. While there are exercises for very young users (incidently, these early tutorials dont even USE numbers!), the tool itself is quite sophisticated and includes functions like exponents, logarithms, square root, and truncation of data. This program has animated stickers and can also "speak" data entries. As if all this weren't enough, "The Cruncher" includes fun and interesting teacher support materials.

Can ya tell I like this one???

Dorothy

Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major