Post-secondary Deaf Education

Key words: Information/Research Studies

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Date: Wed, 5 Jun 1996 19:24:59 +0800

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Harry Blackmore

Subject: Post-secondary Deaf Education

Comments: cc: habla@earth.rlcc.com.au

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I would be grateful if anyone could help me with information I am seeking about post-secondary education for prelingually, profoundly deaf students.

My purpose is to consider ways and means of helping gifted deaf students in Western Australia towards realising their higher educational potential.

In his book, "Educating the Deaf, Psychology, Principles, and Practices" (1978 ed.), American Professor Donald Moores made the comment that

"Evidence suggests few deaf individuals have graduated from (universities) over the years and that the majority of those who have were in reality hard of hearing or postlingually deaf."

he added that

"It is doubtful that any postsecondary program, no matter how exemplary, can overcome the inadequate education most deaf individuals receive in the early intervention, elementary, and secondary years."

1. These comments were made in 1978, and I would like to know what pre-tertiary programs of education for prelingually, profoundly deaf children are now meeting the challenge implied in Professor Moores' remarks.

2. What reviews have been done on past prelingually, profoundly deaf school-leavers proceeding to tertiary education? In other words, do pre-tertiary education units carry out quality assurance reviews on the effectiveness of their performance?

3. Of prelingually, profoundly deaf graduates from tertiary education institutions I wish to know:
a) Were they reading before the age of six years?
b) Were they avid readers throughout childhood?
c) What pre-tertiary teaching methods applied? (e.g., oral, cued speech, manual)
d) What do they believe prepared them best for tertiary education?
e) How did they cope with tertiary lectures? (e.g., interpreters, note-takers, speech-reading skills, printed lecture notes, etc.)
f) What suggestions for any improvements do they offer from their own experience?

All information received will be treated confidentially, and the general collation from such for publication, together with due acknowledgements, will be made available to any who request it.

Harry Blackmore
Vice-President
Western Australian School for Deaf Children Inc. 1896-1996

Dr Harry Blackmore
+61 9 245 1474 Mail: 43 Newborough St, Scarborough, Western Australia, 6019

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Date: Wed, 5 Jun 1996 07:44:31 CST

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Malinda Eccarius

Subject: Post-secondary Deaf

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Harry,

The questions you raised in your posting are especially interesting to me as I work with Deaf college students in a State University deaf education training program. I have had both MS and PhD candidates in my classes, prelingually and profoundly deaf. I have also worked with gifted teens and undergraduate science interns in our research program at Boys Town National Research Hospital. I don't have answers to your questions. Rather, I have some questions to add:

1. From the variety of secondary and post secondary programs represented by the population I work with, it would seem that the range of potentially effective methods is immense. Is the match between individual and program more important that the characteristics of the individual OR the program by themselves?

2. A percentage of these students seem to have had and seem to be having a completely different educational experience than their hearing peers in the same setting. I suspect this is true of many students with cultural and linguistic backgrounds different than the "average" American college student. Is there a universal standard for achieving a quality education?

3. There have been individuals in my experience who have reached tertiary educational programs or even gone on to graduate programs with questionable skills in logical reasoning, organization of ideas that impairs communication through print, and even difficulty in taking multiple perspectives (this is not limited to Deaf students, by any means). How does this happen? Should it be accepted? remediated? considered a reason to stop continued education?

4. When any student reaches the level of post-secondary education, ideally, or at least historically, the emphasis of that education changes from acquisition of knowledge to application and analysis of knowledge. In actuality, many programs which are labeled as university provide technical and vocational training. When we analyze the progress of Deaf students in post-secondary programs, should we also analyze the programs themselves before describing the success rate?

I wish I knew the answers to these questions. Please share the general results of your survey. This is an area that should receive much more attention than it does.

Malinda Eccarius
Boys Town National Research Hospital
eccarius@boystown.org

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Date: Thu, 6 Jun 1996 16:57:58 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: "Beth Carlson (DMLL)"

Subject: Deaf Students in postsecondary programs

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <199606060406.AAA24452@quijote.lang.usf.edu>

Hi to all--

Beth Carlson here of St. Petersburg Jr. College. In reference to the performance of students who are deaf in postsecondary settings, there is a substantial amount of research done in the areas mentioned by Harry. Although relative to the practical application of what the data suggests, there is a bit of a breakdown.

Much of the success we see depends on the individual and the quality of the services offered to that individual. Susan B. Foster and Gerard G. Walter (1992) have published an excellent book (ISBN 0-415-07128-3) "Deaf Students in Postsecondary Education" that addresses many of the concerns facing programs who serve students who are deaf.

If you are interested in further references, please email me privately.

--Beth Carlson
carlson@quijote.lan.usf.edu
carlson777@aol.com

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Date: Fri, 7 Jun 1996 15:38:12 -0700

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Stephen Tontoni

Subject: Re: Post-secondary Deaf Education

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <199606051125.TAA13092@perth.DIALix.oz.au>

Please visit the home page of the Regional Education Center for Deaf Students at Seattle Central Community College. (shameless plug) The URL is:

http://www.sccd.ctc.edu/~stonto

Many of the services will change as our funding changes, but the essential direct services will continue. There are links from there to other web sites, and it is a good resource for the Seattle area.

--Stephen Tontoni
tontoni@halcyon.com
stonto@seaccc.sccd.ctc.edu
stonto@seaccd.sccd.ctc.edu

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Date: Sun, 23 Jun 1996 00:31:13 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Steve Hardy-Braz

Organization: Gallaudet University, Washington, DC

Subject: Re: Post-secondary Deaf Education

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Dr. Blackmore,

In your earlier post, you quoted Don Moores' text from 1978. I just thought that I'd let you know that his text has been recently updated. It is now (1996) in it's fourth edition. His chapter on post-secondary education of students who are deaf still paints a rather bleak picture. If you are in need of that chapter or of information in it-contact me off list and I'll see what I can do.

Steve

Steven T. Hardy-Braz
School Psychologist

Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major