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Inclusion vs Mainstreaming

Key words: Information, Deaf Related Issues, Deaf Education

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Date: Wed, 24 Apr 1996 11:14:03 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Birgit Woelker

Subject: Inclusion vs Mainstreaming

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I am trying to understand the differences between Inclusion of a hearing impaired child into a regular class versus Mainstreaming it. The Information I get is very confusing. Could somebody please tell me what the differences are, and also what advantages/disadvantages one approach has over the other. Thank you all very much.

Birgit Woelker
birgit@asterix.bio.sunysb.edu

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Date: Wed, 24 Apr 1996 21:17:09 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: _namestephanie M

Subject: Re: Inclusion vs Mainstreaming

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: "Your message dated Wed, 24 Apr 1996 20:34:19 -0400" <1.5.4.32.19960425003419.00669ef4@tiac.net>

I have heard the difference between inclusion and mainstreaming explained as a shift in emphasis. Mainstreaming was sending the student out from the special education placement. Inclusion is beginning with the student in the regular education placement and then trying to fit the appropriate supports and services to keep the student closest to this placement as possible. This is supposedly based upon the LRE (Least Restrictive Environment) portion of IDEA. However, LRE and the appropriateness of placement has been interpreted to include residential schools as well as regular education classrooms for specific students.

Inclusion proponents stress that special education should be a menu of services versus a segregated placement. In that view mainstreaming is different. When the child is mainstreamed, we expect the child to perform on grade level with little or no adaptations and modifications. When a child is included, anything and everything may be adapted and modified. The goals for the included child may be grade levels away from those of the typical functioning peers.

It is clear that the current terms are not clear to many people. Often the philosophical and the practical are at odds. I personnally prefer mainstreaming most of the students with whom I work, but inclusion will probably be out there for some time to come.

Stephanie

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Date: Wed, 24 Apr 1996 20:34:19 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: Inclusion vs Mainstreaming

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Inclusion and maintreaming are basically the same thing. It is the inclusion of a special needs child into an appropriate mainstream classroom along with any needed and appropriate services that the special needs child requires.

Full inclusion is another matter altogether. This is the situation where a school system is trying to place all but the 'most severe' special needs students into mainstream classrooms, regardless of the real needs of the individual child, often in defiance of the child's IEP. The prime motivator is to save money. There is also a faction of parents with special needs children that feel that it is best for 'society' that all special needs children are included in the regular classroom.

Inclusion can be a very appropriate and successful option for many special needs children. Full inclusion is a pipe dream that will harm many more children than it will help.

Chris
<<< Christofer deHahn...dehahn@tiac.net....dehahn@East.Sun.COM >>>
<<< CAE Systems Engineer...Sun Microsystems...'91 Buell RS1200 >>>

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Date: Thu, 25 Apr 1996 17:59:14 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Mbeany@AOL.COM

Subject: Re: Inclusion vs Mainstreaming

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In response to inclusion verus mainstreaming issue.

The difference is in the words. Mainstreaming is an older term. Students can be partially mainstreamed or fully mainstreamed depending on their individual needs. Basically it means being taught with hearing students.

Inclusion is a newer word that came about in the late 80's. Some of the special education groups like TASH or ARC decide that their students were not really being mainstreamed and were in self contained class all day long (they are right) they decided to push for full inclusion. Under full inclusion there would be no self contained classroom. All students would be taught by the regular education teacher. There would be no need for special education or deaf education teachers as there woud not even be a resource room. This may be OK for a few children but many would never make it.

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Date: Thu, 25 Apr 1996 02:15:40 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: THESAP@AOL.COM

Subject: Re: Inclusion vs Mainstreaming

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

It is my understanding and I may be wrong, that inclusion is when all of the special services are included in the classroom. This might mean that several professionals are in the same room. A person for the LD student, a deaf educator for the deaf student... On the other hand mainstreaming simply means that the child receives the services in the school. Not necessarily in the same room. They still might have to go to the speech path room, etc., or get English from a deaf educator in an isolated room. This also means that an interpreter is in the room for the deaf child that signs, but not necessarily anyone else.

Beth

Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major