EDUDEAF: Learning to Read

Key words: Instructional Strategies, Literacy, K-3

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Date: Wed, 5 Jun 1996 13:08:00 -0600

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: "Johnson, George (M&C Don)"

Subject: Learning to Read

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hello! I'm back... with another question about teaching reading skills.

Our 4 y/o daughter's initial audiogram (1993) showed a moderate severe to severe loss, 55 to 75 dB. The last audiogram done in March shows additional loss into the 75 to 95 dB range. I tend to think it would be more difficult for her to learn to read if her hearing continues to deteriorate. Is this a correct assumption? If yes, would Emily be better off if we found a relaxed, fun way to help her learn to read now?

George Johnson
worry wart in Idaho

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Date: Wed, 5 Jun 1996 16:42:55 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: "Marilyn W. Galloway"

Subject: Thoughts on literacy and young deaf children

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I asked our Pre-College language curriculum specialist, Martha French, a general question about reading and 4 year olds and the following was her response.

I can only make general comments about the concerns raised....

I think the literacy activities (and goals) for a 4 year old deaf child should be the same as those for a 4 year old hearing child. What often happens, however, is that deaf children miss out on these activities because they do not have the kind of language environment that supports their own language development or the literacy activities. In other words, they need to be acquiring language *on schedule* and also involved in rich literacy experiences that will enable them to learn literacy skills in developmentally appropriate activities. I would be as concerned -- probably more so -- about a young child's language development as I would about their literacy development.

If you (Marilyn) want more information about appropriate language and literacy goals for young children, I can give you some materials I have put together or some excellent references.

I hope this helps...I know it's so general.

Martha

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Date: Wed, 5 Jun 1996 21:21:48 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: KNPONGOR@GALLUA.GALLAUDET.EDU

Subject: Re: Learning to Read

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi George,

Just my two cents....which is free by the way!

In working with a large, diverse population of hearing impaired children of all ages, functioning levels and hearing loss, I feel the biggest thing any parent can do is provide a positive experience with books for your child. Go to the library, find interesting books, check out what's available in terms of storytimes. Read with your child often. Have your child "read" her/his favorite books to you.

I have found that a number of deaf children I have worked with are terrified of books and reading because they have had few positive experiences. We read together, have book buddies, take turns sharing/telling stories....it's fun, it's interactive and yes, it is part of learning to read.

Every once in a while I do things like have a secret word. The kids get an index card with a word written on it, say.... "jump". Everytime they find that word in a book during the course of the day, week, whatever, they get a reinforcer or treat. It's a little bit of vocabulary development combined with a little bribe ;) If it's appropriate, I also have the kids say/sign the word when they see it as well. For the kids who don't have as much hearing, I work with them on articulation of the correct number of syllables in the secret words. There's lots of fun things you can do. And the key word is FUN. Enjoy it.....don't make it a chore!

Kathy Pongor
KDES/Primary

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Date: Thu, 6 Jun 1996 13:51:31 -0700

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: "N. Deshaw"

Subject: Re: Learning to Read

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <19960606.122632.16159.2.tfriend@juno.com>

Hi--My 8 year old son is Deaf and loves to read. He is above his 3rd grade level in reading and has great written skills. We read to him as a child using our version of ASL and he soon began to look at the book we were reading and ask "where does it say that". We also have had a closed caption device on our TV since he was 2yr and he got very used to the written word and learned quite a bit from that. A thought to help interest kids in reading and writing is to make list with them and have them write or read the list with you--ie the grocery store....

Niki

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Date: Thu, 6 Jun 1996 18:02:03 EDT

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Cathy Brandt

Subject: Re: Learning to Read

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: Message of Wed, 5 Jun 1996 13:08:00 -0600 from

Allow me to be an echo

FUN as you have heard/read is the key word here. A child's work is play. They will have all of their life to WORK. Now is the time for them to play. The NEAT part is that even WORK can be PLAY - it just needs to be done in an enjoyable way.

I think kids - regardless of their age - love to get notes and messages. One idea might be to leave her 3 - 6 word messages in various places such as under pillow, in her toy box, at her placemat, pinned to her stuffed animals, in her drawer of clothes, etc.

I wouldn't bombard her with these. I'd perhaps start with one every few days and leave it in a different place. It might become a game to find where daddy or mommy left me a note. Be sure and put her name on it and a positive message.

Notes under her pillow: Emily, sleep well. I love you, Daddy. Notes to her bear: Teddy loves Emily's blue eyes. Notes on her toys: Have fun playing. I love you, Daddy. Notes on her placemat: Ice cream is for dessert!!!!!

Well, you get the picture. Just one idea.

Cathy - someone who loves to get notes - why do you think I have such a passion for email :)

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Date: Fri, 7 Jun 1996 21:12:43 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: Learning to Read

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

What is her primary mode of communication, and what level of language does she have now? I know the answers but these are the questions I would ask myself if I were in your position. IMO reading comprehension has a lot more to do with a child's level and interest in language than their audiogram.

Chris
<< Chris deHahn.....CdH.....System, Network, CAE Administrator >>
<< Sun Microsystems, Inc....dehahn@tiac.net...'91 Buell RS1200 >>

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Date: Thu, 6 Jun 1996 12:25:03 PST

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Timothy R Friend

Subject: Re: Learning to Read

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I hope you don't mind if I add another two cents (that makes four cents now!) but I couldn't agree with you more. My two year old son is severely hearing impaired and didn't show much interest in books when we first started reading to him. We kept reading to him, getting books with big bright pictures and simple text and making a big deal of cuddling together in the big chair with a book, and now he loves it when we read to him. We always have this big box of books from the local library next to our big reading chair and he always thinks its neat when he gets to lean over the arm of the chair and pick out another book from the box. I always say the title to him as I am opening the book, so he knows the title of some of his favorite books. I think it is one of the reasons he is speaking so well; he gets a lot of one-on-one language input from reading books.

Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major