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Standardized Tests

Key words: Information, Deafness Related Issues, Deaf Education

Submitted by: Lisa Sommers

TOPIC:

A Compendium of Tests Available for Assessing students with hearing impairments.

TASK:

To educate deaf education practicum students, deaf education teachers, and other professionals that work with students with hearing impairments of the tests that are available and readily used in the field of deaf education. Another task was to alert the above mentioned individuals of the bias that may be involved in testing hearing impaired students.

REFERENCES:

Abraham, S., & Stoker, R. (1988). Language assessment of hearing impaired children and youth: Patterns of test use. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 19, 160-174.

Gearheart C., and Gearheart, B. (1990). Introduction to special education assessment:Principles and practices. Denver: Love.

Kent State University Speech and Hearing Clinic, Kent State, Ohio, School of Speech Pathology and Audiology.

Ziezula, F.R. (Ed.). (1982). Assessment for hearing impaired people: A guide for selecting psychological, educational, and vocational tests. Washington, DC: Gallaudet College.

SUMMARY:

This list of tests is by no means exhaustive and it also does not provide enough information for teachers to decide what tests to use for their students with hearing impairments. This manual was designed to narrow the choices from the hundreds of choices of tests available today for use. It was also designed to provide information on tests that may be used by others in related fields and make deaf education professionals aware of what these tests actually test and how they are standardized.

QUESTIONS and INSIGHTS:

Many teachers do not like to use standardized tests because they feel that more naturalistic testing provides them with more information on their students. Although the case may be true, standardized tests offer valuable information if they are used correctly. Standardized tests may be subject to misuse but if a teacher uses them wisely and knows the standardization procedures used for a specific test, much sampling bias and misuse may be eliminated.

Although alternate assessment measures are widely used to assess hearing impaired students, it is not to the benefit of the educator to bad mouth standardized tests as they seem to be in existence for many years to come. Instead of wasting our energies in this regard, we need to be improving the tests that are available, and begin to prove our case for alternate assessment as to pave the way for alternate assessments to begin to replace standardized testing.

INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this manual is twofold:

1. To make known and familiarize practicum students, hearing- impaired educators, families, and other professionals who work directly with hearing-impaired students with some of the tests available for use.

2. To serve as a reference source.

It should be kept in mind that only a skeletal framework of each test is provided and it does not take the place of the original manual accompanying each test. The examiner should always read the manual in detail to obtain pertinent information as to each test and its specific procedures.

A brief description, including the purposes, uses, materials, administration, standardization, publisher, and experience necessary to administer the tests are outlined in the following pages.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN'S COMPREHENSION OF LANGUAGE................1

BANKSON LANGUAGE SCREENING TEST-2.................................2

*CAROLINA PICTURE VOCABULARY TEST.................................3

CLINICAL EVALUATION OF LANGUAGE FUNDAMENTALS-REVISED..............4

EVALUATING COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE-REVISED.......................6

*GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS OF ELICITED LANGUAGE:COMPLEX SENTENCE LEVEL..............7

ILLINOIS TEST OF PSYCHOLINGUISTIC ABILITIES.......................8

*MATSON EVALUATION OF SOCIAL SKILLS-D/HH..........................9

PEABODY INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENT TEST (PIAT).......................10

PEABODY PICTURE VOCABULARY TEST..................................11

*RHODE ISLAND TEST OF LANGUAGE STRUCTURE.........................12

SLOSSON INTELLIGENCE TEST........................................13

*STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST-HI....................................14

TEST OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT-2-INTERMEDIATE......................15

TEST OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT-2-PRIMARY...........................16

TEST FOR AUDITORY COMPREHENSION OF LANGUAGE-REVISED..............17

*TRANSDISCIPLINARY PLAY-BASED ASSESSMENT.........................18

WORD INTELLIGIBILITY BY PICTURE IDENTIFICATION ..................19

BIBLIOGRAPHY

ASSESSMENT OF CHILDREN'S COMPREHENSION OF LANGUAGE

Rochana Foster, Jane Gidden, and Joel Stark

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To evaluate a child's comprehension of single vocabulary items and of phrases with 2, 3, and 4 critical elements. This test enables the examiner to determine how many word classes in different combinations of length and complexity a child would be able to understand. (It is not a measure of the child's expressive performance and is limited to assessing comprehension in the presence of pictures.)

USES:

For children ages 3 through 6. This test helps identify children who have difficulty processing auditory information.

MATERIALS:

1. Manual with 50 single items and 10 plates each for identification of 2, 3, and 4 critical element phrases.

2. Score sheets.

3. Administrator's manual.

ADMINISTRATION: (pp. 15-19)

Under optimal conditions the test can be administered in ten minutes. It is a 4-part receptive test. The examiner explains the task to the child. The child is asked to point to the items. Items are not preceded by articles when presented. The first ten plates contain 5 separate pictures and the remaining plates there is only one response required per picture. Level of difficulty increases from subtest A-D.

SCORING:

Errors are counted and converted into percentages. Norms for children ages 3 through 6 are tabled in the manual.

STANDARDIZATION:

Norming group consisted of 365 nursery school and kindergarten children. There are no percentile rankings or standard deviations provided. There are also no reliability and validity data listings available in the manual.

PUBLISHER:

Consulting Psychologists Press, 1969, revised 1973

NOTES:

May not be a good test to use because of the standardization procedures listed above.

BANKSON LANGUAGE SCREENING TEST-2

NICOLAS BANKSON

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To test psycholinguistic and perceptual skills that could be tested within a relatively short period of time.

USES:

For children aged 3-7 years. Test was designed to assess expressive language and to determine appropriate areas for further language testing.

MATERIALS:

Test manual and score sheet.

ADMINISTRATION:

The test is designed to be given on a one-to-one basis. When a quick screening of language is desired, sometimes it is appropriate to administer the 38 items from the BLST that have been determined to be the most discriminating. It can then be determined whether or not proceeding with the complete test is warranted. The test is divided into 3 categories: semantic knowledge, morphological rules, and pragmatics.

STANDARDIZATION:

This test was normed on 1,200 children. No norms are provided for children who are deaf.

PUBLISHER:

Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Dr., Austin TX 78758

CAROLINA PICTURE VOCABULARY TEST

Thomas Layton and David Holmes

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To assess the receptive sign vocabulary of hearing impaired children.

USES:

For children ages 4.0-11.6 years old.

MATERIALS:

Test plates, score sheet, examiner who signs.

ADMINISTRATION:

The test is made up of 130 plates. Each plate contains four line drawings. The child must choose the correct picture from the examiner's sign. This test takes 10-15 minutes to complete.

STANDARDIZATION:

This test was normed on 767 hearing impaired children. The sample was taken from a nationwide population of children who used manual communication as their primary mode of communication. **It is important to note that the examiner must be familiar with the sign system used by the child. The appropriate sign must be used. For example, a child who uses ASL would not be scored fairly by an examiner who uses SEE because signs may be very different for the same word. Another important note is that when signs are iconic, vocabulary knowledge may not be assessed accurately.

PUBLISHER:

Pro-Ed, 1985, 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin TX 78758

CLINICAL EVALUATION OF LANGUAGE FUNDAMENTALS-REVISED

Eleanor Semel, Elisabeth Wiig, and Wayne Secord

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the level of language functioning and to probe different aspects of language disorders.

USES:

Used with children aged 5-16 years. Used with children with learning disabilities and with developmental handicaps.

MATERIALS:

Manual and record form.

ADMINISTRATION: (p.47)

The CELF-R consists of 11 subtests which probe syntax, semantics, memory and word retrieval, and two supplementary tests which probe phonological processing and production. The CELF-R can be used in its entirety or the examiner may choose the subtests which best fit the client being tested. This means that the time of administration differs, but the authors suggest it takes 1-1/2 hours to administer the entire battery.

STANDARDIZATION:

The sample consisted of 2,400 children. There are no norms for children who are deaf. The norms are available in three forms.

1. Language age scores for Total Processing and Total Production.

2. Percentile ranks by grade level for Total Processing and Total Production.

3. Individual subtest pass/fail criterion scores for each grade level.

NOTES:

A disadvantage of the CELF is that there are no basals and ceilings. An advantage is that it has an error analysis grid that pinpoints a target or objective for where you can start.

PUBLISHER:

Psychological Corp. 555 Academic Ct. PO Box 839954 San Antonio TX 78293

EVALUATING COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE-REVISED

Charlann S. Simon

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To Assess the quality of language processing skills, memory, application of metalinguistic knowledge, and the use of knowledge for various communicative purposes.

USES:

Children aged 9-17 years. Focus is placed on the "cognitive uses" of language ie. explanation, description, analysis, and inquiry. The ECC provides information on three common skills needed in the classroom such as auditory, syntactic, and pragmatic skills.

MATERIALS:

Manual, Stimulus Materials Notebook, materials for expressive tasks, tape recorder, and a score sheet.

ADMINISTRATION:

This test consists of 21 informal evaluation tasks. The first 7 are auditory tasks (comprehension of directions, absurdities, interview, etc.) and tasks 8-21 are expressive tasks (storytelling, similarities and differences, relationships, twenty questions, and barrier games, etc). The test takes about 1 hour to administer. The ECC presents a "structured discourse" design which enables valuable diagnostic information to be obtained, yet interspersing conversation at the same time, throughout the administration of the tasks.

STANDARDIZATION:

This test is not standardized. This is a criterion-referenced procedure that provided descriptive information. It should be used in conjunction with standardized procedures.

NOTES:

The ECC format attempts to balance social interaction and the more directed types of interactions found in the classroom. The ECC is flexible in that all or parts of it may be used, depending on the diagnostic time available.

PUBLISHER:

Communication Skill Builders, 3830 E Bellevue PO Box 42050- E91 Tucson AZ 85733

GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS OF ELICITED LANGUAGE: COMPLEX SENTENCE LEVEL (GAEL-C)

Jean Moog and Ann Geers

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

The purpose of the GAEL-C is to provide an alternative to language sampling and sentence imitation. it is designed to elicit and evaluate elements of spoken and/or signed English in children (i.e., later developing sentence structures).

USES:

1. Used to evaluate the language of both hearing-impaired and normally-hearing children.

2. In order to determine a need for continued language instruction, the hearing-impaired child's performance can be compared to that of a normal-hearing child.

ADMINISTRATION: (pp.7-44)

A set of 22 activities is used to elicit 88 target sentences which contain a variety of complex sentence structures. The activities include toy manipulation, story telling, picture description, and a variety of guessing games. The child is to attempt each of the 88 target sentences twice: once in response to the situation (Prompted productions) and once in imitation of the examiner's model (Imitated Productions). There are no basals and ceilings; all 88 sentences are to be elicited.

STANDARDIZATION: (pp.85-91)

The GAEL-C was standardized on 510 children: 240 normal-hearing children, 120 severely hearing-impaired children, and 150 profoundly deaf children. The criteria for inclusion were as follows: a hearing impairment acquired before 2 years of age, educated using oral communication, no other handicaps of educational significance, and a hearing level of 70 to 95dBHL for severely hearing-impaired and greater than 95dBHL for profoundly deaf. "Number Correct" are presented for each group. "Percent Correct" scores for each grammatical category were averaged from each group in order to make comparisons.

SCORING: (pp. 45-76)

The test provides standard scores, percentile ranks, and an overall Language Quotient score; as well as a chart to plot the child's profile from the 17 grammatical categories tested. The authors state that this is a thorough test, taking 2 1/2 hours to administer, transcribe, and score. They feel the time is worthwhile because of the detailed analysis of the child's grammatical structures that is obtained.

PUBLISHER:

Central Institute of the Deaf, 1980.
818 South Euclid Avenue
St Louis Missouri 63110

ILLINOIS TEST OF PSYCHOLINGUISTIC ABILITIES

Samuel Kirk, James McCarthy, and Winifred Kirk

Table of Contents

PURPOSE: Used to identify specific abilities and disabilities in children and establish whether or not remediation is needed. Primary purpose is to assess areas of difficulty in communication. Used as a base for development of instructional programs.

USES:

Used for children ages 2.6 to 10.3 years old. Can be used as a measure of differential diagnosis of children which can be presented in the form of a psychodiagnostic profile. Used for testing the mentally retarded, visually impaired, dyslexic, hearing impaired, and language disordered.

MATERIALS:

Picture books, plastic bag of 6 objects, visual form chips, rubber tray, examiner's manual, and record forms.

ADMINISTRATION:

The test is divided into 10 primary tests of psycholinguistic abilities and two subtests.
-Auditory reception
-Visual reception
-Visual Sequential Memory
-Auditory Association
-Auditory Sequential Memory
-Visual Association
-Visual Closure
-Verbal Expression
-Grammatic Closure
-Manual Expression
-Auditory Closure
-Sound Blending

STANDARDIZATION:

This test was standardized on 1,000 children between the ages of 2 and 10. The children were average on intelligence, school achievement, and socioeconomic status, and had intact sensory and motor development.

PUBLISHER:

University of Illinois Press
54 E Gregory Drive
Champaign IL 61820

MATSON EVALUATION OF SOCIAL SKILLS-D/HH

Dr. Sharon Newburg-Rinn

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

This scale was originally developed for hearing students. The primary focus is on social skills which can be taught (educational model), as opposed to internal psychological problems (medical, or "sickness" model).

USES:

Appropriate for children ages 14-21

MATERIALS:

ADMINISTRATION:

Takes about 20 minutes to administer. If a student does not understand a particular item, the manual gives some guidance for a test monitor to sign the item.

SCORING:

STANDARDIZATION:

Norming was done on the Gallaudet campus and many who assisted in the development of the test were native signers. Wording of some items was changed to make them easier to read by deaf students.

PUBLISHER:

IDS Publishing, Worthington OH
A full sample instruction copy or manual and test materials can be obtained by contacting Maggi Reiss at:
IDS Publishing Co. Box 389 Worthington OH 43085

PEABODY INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENT TEST

Lloyd Dunn, PhD. and Fredrick Markwardt, PhD.

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To provide a wide-range screening measure of achievement in areas of math, reading, spelling, and general information.

USES:

It gives an overview of scholastic attainment and helps the examiner in selecting more appropriate diagnostic instruments for a particular subject, when more is needed. This test is used by a variety of professional persons working in a variety of settings-including schools, institutions, industry, and community agencies who need to screen for the general level of school achievement of children, adolescents, or adults. For children ages 5.3 to adults 18.3.

MATERIALS:

test booklet

ADMINISTRATION:

The five subtests are to be given in the order in which they are numbered. The examiner may omit certain subtests, however, those administered should be given in the standard order since the test was standardized in that fashion. Omitting subtest will eliminate the use of the Total Test norms.
Subtest Descriptions (in order to be given)
Mathematics: 84 multiple choice (4 options) items. Range from matching, recognizing numbers to measuring in geometry and trigonometry.
Reading Recognition:
Reading Comprehension: 66 items. First page the subject reads a sentence silently. Second page is shown to the subject after they have read the first. It has 4 illustrations on it. The subject is asked to select the one that best illustrates the meaning of the previous sentence.
Spelling: 84 multiple choice items.
General Information: 84 items that are read by the examiner to the subject. The subject answers them orally. This subtest measures general encyclopedia knowledge about science, social studies, fine arts, and sports.

STANDARDIZATION:

This test was standarized nationally using 2,889 subjects across grade levels of K-12 equally.

PUBLISHER:

American Guidance Inc. Publisher's Building, Circle Pines, MN 55014

PEABODY PICTURE VOCABULARY TEST-REVISED

Lloyd Dunn, PhD and Leota Dunn

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

Designed to provide a quick estimate of receptive (hearing) vocabulary for Standard American English and an estimate of scholastic aptitude.

USES:

Normed for persons ages 2 1/2 years to 40 years who can see and hear reasonably well and who understand some Standard American English. No verbalization, reading, or written responses are required.

MATERIALS:

Spiral-bound book with number plates
Manual
Individual test records

ADMINISTRATION:

Test takes 10-20 minutes to administer. Subjects answer only 35-40 items in their "critical range". The PPVT-R has two alternate forms. Each test item has four simple black and white illustrations arranged in a multiple choice format. The subject must point to or say the number of the picture that best illustrates the meaning of the stimulus word presented orally by the examiner.

STANDARDIZATION:

This test was standardized nationally on 5,028 persons--4,200 adolescents and children and 828 adults.

SCORING:

The test is discontinued when a basal and ceiling level have been established.

PUBLISHER:

American Guidance Service, Publisher's Building, PO Box 99, Circle Pines, MN 55014

RHODE ISLAND TEST OF LANGUAGE STRUCTURE

Elizabeth Engen and Trygg Engen

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To assess hearing impaired children's syntactic processing of sentences.

USES:

For hearing impaired children ages 3-20

ADMINISTRATION:

Takes approximately 30 minutes to administer the test. The test consists of 50 simple and 50 complex sentences designed to represent 20 types of sentences. The child must match the sentence to the appropriate picture (out of a set of three).

STANDARDIZATION:

Normed on 513 hearing impaired students and 304 hearing students.

PUBLISHER:

Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, Tx 78758

SLOSSON INTELLIGENCE TEST

Richard Slosson

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To provide a screening measure of intelligence.

USES:

For ages 5 to 27 years old. Can be used by educators, psychologists, guidance counselors, and speech clinicians.

MATERIALS:

Manual and score sheet

ADMINISTRATION:

The examiner asks the subject a question and the subject responds. The test is continued until a ceiling is reached (10 errors consecutively).

STANDARDIZATION:

Normed on 1,109 persons ranging in age from 27 to 216 months. The norm tables have been equated to the Stanford Binet.

PUBLISHER: Psychological Corp. 555 Academic Court, PO Box 839954 San Antonio TX 78293

STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST-HI

Eric Gardner, Herbert Rudman, Bjorn Karlsen, and Jack Merwin

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To assess skill development in major content areas.

USES:

For children grades 1-9

ADMINISTRATION: Takes between 4 1/2 and 6 1/2 hours. The test is divided by grade levels.

STANDARDIZATION:

Normed on hearing impaired students enrolled in special education programs in the U.S.

PUBLISHER:

The Psychological Corp., 555 Academic Court, PO Box 9954, San Antonio, TX 78204

TEST OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT-2-INTERMEDIATE

Phyllis Newcomer and Donald Hammill

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

Used to measure the semantic and syntactic skills, both expressively and receptively.

USES:

For children ages 8.6 to 12.11.
To identify children who are below their peers in language development.
To identify individual strengths and weaknesses.
To document progress made through intervention.
To serve as a measurement device for research.

MATERIALS:

Score sheet and manual.

ADMINISTRATION:

The test should be given in full and in the order it is presented in the score sheet. Read the directions at the beginning of each subtest to the child. If a child asks for a repetition of an item, complete the entire subtest then repeat that item once again at the end. Subtests include: Sentence Combining, Characteristics, Word Ordering, Generals, and grammatic Comprehension.

STANDARDIZATION:

Normed on more than 1,000 children who were representative of the U.S. population on a number of variables.

PUBLISHER:

Pro-Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd., Austin, TX 78758

TEST OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT-2-PRIMARY

PHYLLIS NEWCOMER AND DONALD HAMMILL

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To identify specific receptive and expressive language skills of primary age children ages 4.0 to 8.11.

USES:

Identification of children who are significantly below their peers in language proficiency.
Determining specific strengths and weaknesses in language skills.
Documentation of progress in language intervention. Measurement of language for research purposes.

MATERIALS:

Picture book, manual, score sheet

ADMINISTRATION:

Subtest of semantics, syntax, and phonology are given in the same order by which the test was standardized. Ceiling scores are reached for each subtest when the child makes 5 consecutive errors. This is not a timed test. It usually takes 30 minutes to administer.

STANDARDIZATION:

Norms are based on 2,436 children from 29 states and one Canadian Province. No norms for students who are deaf are reported.

PUBLISHER:

Pro Ed, 8700 Shoal Creek Blvd, Austin, TX 78758

TEST OF AUDITORY COMPREHENSION OF LANGUAGE-REVISED (TACL-R)

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

The TACRL-R was designed to assess the auditory comprehension of language.

USES:

This test is especially good for use with hearing-impaired, mentally retarded, aphasic, articulation disordered, or clinically language disordered subjects. Normative data is provided for children ages three to ten.

MATERIALS:

picture book and score sheet
Test is made up of three sections containing 40 items each:
Section I: word classes and relations (show me girl)
Section II: grammatical morphemes (cap is on the toothpaste)
Section III: elaborated sentences (the man and the boy ate popcorn)

ADMINISTRATION:

Read instructions and present the test stimuli precisely as indicated in the test book. Make a statement and ask the subject to point to the correct response. Simultaneously observe and record the responses. Calculate chronological age. Strictly apply basal and ceiling rules: Basal: subject must pass the first 4 consecutive items at an age level before proceeding with successive test items.

SCORING:

Mark a slash (/) through the number corresponding to the subjects response. If the subject does not respond or says, "I don't know"), mark a slash through NR (no response) on the record sheet. Raw scores and Standard scores can be calculated. Age equivalent scores are provided in Table 6 in the examiner's manual.

TRANSDICIPLINARY PLAY-BASED ASSESSMENT

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To observe and record the communication and language of preschool children to note strengths and weaknesses in many areas.

USES:

MATERIALS:

ADMINISTRATION:

This test consists of many sections including: language sample, modality of communication, pragmatics, phonology, semantics, and syntax, comprehension, oral motor development, other areas, and a summary sheet.

STANDARDIZATION:

PUBLISHER:

WORD INTELLIGIBILITY BY PICTURE IDENTIFICATION

Mark Ross and Jay Lerman

Table of Contents

PURPOSE:

To test speech discrimination ability of hearing impaired children.

USES:

1. Children with hearing impairment.
2. Children with hearing impairment and mental retardation.

MATERIALS:

1. Manual of directions and pictures.
2. Response sheets.
3. Equipment and room setting for audiological evaluation.

ADMINISTRATION:

The child is seated at a table with the test booklet in front of him/her. They are instructed to point to the pictures named by the examiner. Earphones are placed on the child, and the test words are delivered at 30 or 40dB SL. Each word is preceded by the carrier phrase "show me". The test requires that the assistant be in the audiology suite with the child in order to turn the pages of the book.

SCORING:

Correct responses are marked. The child receives 4% for every word correct with a maximum score of 100%. Interpretation of the score is explained in the administration manual.

PUBLISHER:

Stanwix House

BIBLIOGRAPHY:
TABLE OF CONTENTS ACCORDING TO SUBJECT

(Tests without a page number are listed as another test the examiner may want to use for that category but it is not overviewed in this manual for one of many reasons)

ACHIEVEMENT TESTS:
AYRES SPELLING TEST
PEABODY INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENT TEST

ARTICULATION TESTS:
A DEEP TEST OF ARTICULATION
GOLDMAN-FRISTOE TEST OF ARTICULATION
TEMPLIN-DARLEY SCREENING

DISCRIMINATION AND PERCEPTION TESTS:
DEVELOPMENTAL TEST OF VISUAL PERCEPTION
ROBBINS SPEECH DISCRIMINATION TEST
WORD INTELLIGIBILITY BY PICTURE IDENTIFICATION

INTELLIGENCE AND DEVELOPMENT TESTS:
CAROLINA PICTURE VOCABULARY
COLUMBIA MENTAL MATURITY TEST
DENVER DEVELOPMENTAL SCREENING TEST
ILLINOIS TEST OF PSYCHOLINGUISTIC ABILITY
MATSON
SLOSSON INTELLIGENCE TEST
STANFORD
VINELAND SOCIAL MATURITY SCALE
YELLOW BRICK ROAD

LANGAUGE TESTS:
BANKSON
TEST OF AURAL COMPREHENSION
CARROW ELICITED LANGUAGE INVENTORY
CLINICAL EVALUATION OF LANGUAGE FUNCTIONING
EVALUATING COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE
GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS OF ELICITED LANGUAGE
NORTHWESTERN SYNTAX SCREENING TEST
RHODE ISLAND TEST OF LANGUAGE STRUCTURE
TEST OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT-I
TEST OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT-P
TEST OF AUDITORY COMPREHENSION OF LANGUAGE
TRANSDISCIPLINARY PLAY-BASED ASSESSMENT
UTAH TEST OF LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

MOTOR TESTS:
OSERETSKY TEST OF MOTOR PROFICINCY

PERSONALITY TESTS:
ADJUSTMENT INVENTORY
PROVERBS TEST

Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education