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Inclusion Model

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  • Subject: Re: House Keeping
  • From: sue manross SMANROSS@KENTVM.KENT.EDU
  • Date: Mon, 29 May 1995 09:20:58 EDT
  • In-Reply-To: Message of Sat, 27 May 1995 15:30:35 EDT from <CBRAN00@UKCC.UKY.EDU>
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Hi Cathy. I will be off-line for about six weeks this summer. I am going to Boston to F I N A L L Y finish a long overdue M.Ed. I will sign off and return with many new ideas and many, many questions. Rattling around my brain now are questions about language curriculum for the Deaf and HoH/assessment issues also. Also I am currently directing a committee for educational reform in our school working with a foundation located in Boston, CTAC. This is reform targeted at beleagured inner city schools. Read yesterday in the Sunday edition of the NY Times magazine, an article about reform taking place in NY city schools. Doing a compare/contrast between NY and Cleveland, noticed a lot NOT in place to facilitate this change in Cleveland. In our particular school, we have picked an "inclusion model". I have questions about what needs to be in-place to foster this model. My own experience with a teaming model (reg ed + my class) was an inadequacy in planning time + support services (interpreter/ teacher assistant) + responsibility of planning fell on me! (I burned out after 3 years.) I have heard many + things about an inclusion model in California called the Tripod program?????, would like more info about them. Sorry to go on and on, sorry that you asked, Cathy???? :-) Everyone on Edudeaf have a safe, restful, reinvigorating summer!

    Sue Manross

    primary HH teacher

    Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    Document 2 of 3

    Information Home Page Deaf Education Home Page Document:1 2 3
  • Subject: Re: NYC Inclusion Model
  • From: "LUCKER, JAY" LUCKERJ@SJUMUSIC.BITNET
  • Date: Tue, 30 May 1995 08:47:28 EDT
  • Comments: To: smanross@kentvm.kent.edu
  • In-Reply-To: In reply to your message of MON 29 MAY 1995 09:20:58 EDT
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Dear Sue,

    I am reacting to your posting re: the Inclusion Model in NYC schools and your interest in comparing this with Cleveland.

    First, good luck on your M.Ed. It takes a lot to get the degree, and I congratulate you on your efforts.

    Now, I'm here in NYC. Most of my students who do student teaching do so in the NYC schools. Also, I see students and parents whose children are in the NYC schools all of the time.

    I can't give you the evidence, but the attitude here is that inclusion is being used not in the sake of better education, but as a method for saving money on providing resources. Often, children with special needs are "included" in the regular educational classroom by merely being "dumped" into the class with the teachers receiving no training or support. Often, some resource services are provided; but all too often the children are placed in regular ed. with the teachers receiving little or no support.

    I don't know of any specific model being used in the NYC public schools or even in the schools in the surrounding suburbs. Unfortunately, sometimes the children begin in the regular classes with little or no support, and eventually are back at the CSEs with requests for support services or back to almost a special ed. situation.

    I hope you discover a successful method of inclusion which the administrations will accept, the boards of education will pay for, and the parents and teachers will buy into and support.

    Have a successful and a great summer !

    Dr. J! @ St. John's

    < luckerj@sjumusic.stjohns.edu >

    Document 3 of 3

    Information Home Page Deaf Education Home Page Document:1 2 3
  • Subject: NYC inclusion model
  • From: sue manross SMANROSS@KENTVM.KENT.EDU
  • Date: Wed, 31 May 1995 05:53:40 EDT
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • This is in response to Dr. J's response to my posting about Cleveland/NY inclusion model. I do LOVE this listserv! It always amazes me how quickly information can be exchanged and from various far away places, ie. NY, Britain, Australia! I am like a kid at Christmas!

    In defense of the Cleveland schools, we do have a continuum of options for our HH kids. Some of our kids have an itinerant teacher who stays in contact with their reg ed teacher, some kids are pulled out by a resource teacher for literacy activities/tutoring, and some kids are involved in "teaming activities" with reg ed kids. We have interpreters. Just was stating how the "teaming model" is the hardest "bear" to tame! I can only speak for our inner city system, my suburban sisters/brothers will have to speak for themselves! Don't want to be involved in spreading any misinformation here! :-)

    Hearing about what is happening in New York city schools thru your first hand experience is VERY disheartening to me. :-( You would think that a society with all our resources could do a better job prioritizing our resources. Sue walks down the hall mumbling to herself (end of the year syndrome), "Do what you can with what you got, the people who care need to hang in there for ALL kids!"

    Dr. J, thanks for sharing your experience.

    Sue Manross

    HH primary teacher

    Cleveland, Ohio, USA

    Uploaded by: Yaser Dhaher/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major.