IBM Software- Writing To Read

Key words: Curriculum Materials, Literacy, K-3

Document 1 of 4

Document: 1 2 3 4

  • Subject: IBM Software- Writing To Read
  • From: "Brent A. Burns" BABURNS@WASSC.TSTC.EDU
  • Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 10:03:02 CST6CDT
  • Organization: Texas State Technical College
  • Reply-To:baburns@tstc.edu
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Hi.. This is Brent Burns, and I have been lurking into this newsgroup for a while, so I decided to contribute a little to this discussion. My hard of hearing daughter (6 1/2 years old) attends Hewitt Elementary School, and she goes to a computer lab where she works on a software, "Writing To Read", produced by IBM.

    After reading what she has been typing her sentences on a computer printout, I noticed that this program seems to help her alot. One day, she tucked in two cute notes on her parents' pillows when they were still asleep!! (my wife and I woke up after 9 a.m. last Saturday) while our kids were playing in the living room. Anyway, my note came out like this:
    Der Daddy
    I gad you
    had a gud sep
    I love you

    My wife and I have noticed that with this software program where she would sound out the words and write them exactly what she hears.

    I am just wondering if anyone in this field uses this program to help deaf and hard of hearing children. I am just wondering what the educators think about this. Any comments on this software in terms of success and flaws, etc.

    Brent Burns

    baburns@wassc.tstc.edu

    Document 2 of 4

    Deaf Education Home Page Document:1 2 3 4
  • Subject: Re: IBM Software- Writing To Read
  • From: Claire Wellsclwells@TENET.EDU
  • Date: Fri, 28 Apr 1995 21:24:03 -0500
  • Comments: To: baburns@tstc.edu
  • In-Reply-To: <199504281505.KAA16197@Paula-Formby.tenet.edu>
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • On Fri, 28 Apr 1995, Brent A. Burns wrote: > Hi.. This is Brent Burns, and I have been lurking into this newsgroup > for a while, so I decided to contribute a little to this discussion. > My hard of hearing daughter (6 1/2 years old) attends Hewitt > Elementary School, and she goes to a computer lab where she works on > a software, _Writing To Read_, produced by IBM.

    Yes, this seems to be a big thing in this area now. It focusses a lot on sounds in speech. It's kind of a print-extension of a phonics based approach to reading and writing.... hmmmm... let me try to be clearer.

    The computer voice says "Say /t/" (the sound) "Type /t/" (again the sound, which is represented by the letter T) The student types t. The computer accepts it and gives recognition. This is good and fine as far as it goes.

    Where the program fails, in my humble opinion, is in the representation of the printed word. For example, the word "little".... you do not speak a double t for that word, right? :-) So in the printed form it would only be represented by a single t.

    In the word "snake" for example, you do not speak the "e" so the computer program does not recognize "e" as being important. So the correct representation of the word "snake" in this program in print is "snak". Hmmmm. I think this is wrong.

    I am not against "invented spellings" :-) All kids do this. I am against any program that reinforces the wrong spelling in print.

    Well, just my 2 cents. But for kids who are *deaf*, I think it is not a good program. For hoh or other kids, I don't think anything can replace a good teacher :-) Like I said, just my humble opinion. I'll have to share with you, too, that I am one of only a few people who have spoken out against this program. Your mileage may vary. I know that there are many programs for the general school population that love this IBM program!

    > After reading what she has been typing her sentences on a computer printout, I noticed that this program seems to help her alot. One day, she tucked in two cute notes on her parents' pillows when they were still asleep!! (my wife and I woke up after 9 a.m. last Saturday) while our kids were playing in the living room. Anyway, my note came out like this:

    Der Daddy
    I gad you
    had a gud sep
    I love you

    My wife and I have noticed that with this software program where she would sound out the words and write them exactly what she hears.

    Yes, and my daughter used to do this, too. So cute. I would ask her to help me make a grocery list. Then we would hand it to her father. :-) (snicker) Good luck, Dad! :-)

    There are lots of ways you can make written language important in your home. Weekend plans are another great way of sharing :-) And so cute!

    And you can save all this stuff and put it in a scrapbook and bribe her with it later, too :-) (snicker, just kidding :-)

    Kids say the cutest things :-)

    Sorry if I don't think the IBM Writing to Read computer lab is the panacea for all kids :-) Like I said, your mileage may vary.

    Claire Wells

    Temple, Texas

    Document 3 of 4

    Deaf Education Home Page Document:1 2 3 4
  • Subject: Re: IBM Software- Writing To Read
  • From: "Cynthia J. Snodgrass" Cyndi68@AOL.COM
  • Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:24:21 -0400
  • Comments: To: baburns@tstc.edu
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Brent Burns wrote about his 6 1/2 year old daughter using the IBM Writing to Read Software. I would also like information on this topic. At my school, all first graders get to go to Writing to Read lab either daily or weekly (I'm not sure which). My two hearing impaired first graders do not attend because I was told that much of the information is received auditorally. I would love to get information I could use to get my students a chance to try. (Although, I'm sure I will be told that it is too close to the end of the year, and next year they will be second graders--i.e. wrong grade to attend.) Please let me know if any teachers have found it appropriate/inappropriate for their students. Thanks!!!

    Cindy--a first year teacher who is trying to battle the system!

    Document 4 of 4

    Deaf Education Home Page Document:1 2 3 4
  • Subject: Re: IBM Software- Writing To Read
  • From: Cathy Brandt CBRAN00@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 13:35:28 EDT
  • In-Reply-To: Message of Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:24:21 -0400 from <Cyndi68@AOL.COM>
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • On Sat, 29 Apr 1995 11:24:21 -0400 Cynthia J. Snodgrass said:
    year they will be second graders--i.e. wrong grade to attend.) Please let me know if any teachers have found it appropriate/inappropriate for their students. Thanks!!!

    I personally think it depends on a number of things:

    #1 Your current approach to teaching reading. No technology regardless of the quality will be an effective tool if it is not closely tied to what the teacher is doing with instruction.

    If the lessons can be connected to what you are doing in the classroom then I would encourage you to continue to talk with the administration or whomever about allowing your students to attend.

    #2 Your students hearing ability. This approach is VERY phonetic based. For profoundly deaf children I do not believe this is the most effective way of teaching reading. If your students do not make good use of their residual hearing I would not recommend this program.

    Those are the biggest factors - does this technology support what you are currently doing as the primary means of instruction and can the student utilize it in a productive way.

    It may be cute software, with fun pictures and fun activities. But, if it doesn't support the reading program being implemented in the class I believe it is NOT a productive use of the student's time. I don't think I'd choose this situation as one to battle if the above two criteria are not met. I think there are much more effective ways of teaching reading and I think there are much more effective uses of technology for deaf students.

    Cathy

    Uploaded by: Yaser Dhaher/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major.