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Hearing Aids Provided By the School

Key words: Information, Deafness Related Issues, Legal Issues

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Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 09:45:50 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Linda Semesky

Subject: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In the Individuals with Disabilities Education Law Report that the US Dept of Ed sent me it cites the following decision:

HEARING AID MUST BE PROVIDED AT NO COST WHEN SPECIFIED IN IEP

OSEP 1993

A hearing aid is considered a covered device under the definition of "assistive technology device". Thus, where a district has determined that a child with a disability requires a hearing aid in order to receive FAPE and the child's IEP specifies that the child needs a hearing aid, the district is responsible for providing the hearing aid at no cost to the child and his or her parents in accordance with 34 CFR 300.308. (Letter to Seiler, 20 IDELR 1216)

STATE DETERMINES WHICH PUBLIC AGENCY MUST PAY FOR ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVICE OSSP 1994

If the IEP of a child with a disability indicates that he/she requires an assistive technology device such as a hearing aid as part of his/her special education, then the responsible public agency would be required to provide the device at no cost to the parents. In the situation where a child attends a state-supported school for the deaf, the determination as to whether the child's home school district or the state school for the deaf must pay for the device is a matter of state law, regulation , or policy. Part B does not prohibit the responsible public agency from seeking funds from sources other than the parents, and ultimately, the state is responsible for ensuring FAPE. (Letter to Gallowy, 22 IDELR 373)

STATES' REGULATION REGARDING FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR PERSONAL ITEMS REQUIRED AMENDMENT

OSEP 1994

A state's regulation, which provided that parents were to assume costs for personal items such as hearing aids, required an additional statement explaining that if such items were specified on the child's IEP as a necessary part of the child's FAPE, they would be provided at no cost to the parents. (Letter to Galloway, 22 IDELR 373)

Unless these have been overruled somewhere, it seems that the IEP drives who will pay. I am researching further.

Linda S.

Document 2 of 25

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Date: Fri, 21 Jun 1996 11:46:00 -0600

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: "Johnson, George (M&C Don)"

Subject: Schools & h/a

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

George wants to know where you got the information that the school system is required to provide hearing aids? My first inclination is to agree with the school. It would save us significant $$ to have school district purchase h/a's.

Thanks,

George

Document 3 of 25

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Date: Fri, 21 Jun 1996 18:16:35 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Linda Semesky

Subject: Re: Regs

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi George! Glad you're still hanging out there! Will take me a few days to get my act together and collect the info...I also suggest that Birgit and others interested in accommodations for hoh children go to the EDLAW site on the net. They have a new guide called "Compliance with the American Disabilities Act: A self-Evaluation Guide for Public Elementary and Secondary Schools." It's put out by the Office for Civil Rights, US Dept of Education. Boy, does it make interesting reading re the rights of our kids and us as parents. Also contains the ADA and IDEA. The info I got re HAs was from Case Law sent to me from the US Dept of Ed.

To find the EDLAW site, just use a net browser or if you are desperate, I'll find the address.

Gotta run...actually have a hubbie home.

Linda

Document 4 of 25

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Date: Fri, 21 Jun 1996 22:56:44 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: Schools & h/a

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

School systems are not required to provide hearing aids for deaf/hoh children. They may agree to provide assistive listening devices such as FM trainers during the school day but they are under no obligation to provide them outside of the school day.

Hearing aids are the responsibility of the family (and possibly the family's insurance plan). If your school system is providing hearing aids (other than HA's with built in FM trainers) then consider yourself very lucky.

Chris

<< Chris deHahn.....CdH.....System, Network, CAE Administrator >>
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Document 5 of 25

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Date: Sun, 23 Jun 1996 10:41:44 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Mbeany@AOL.COM

Subject: Re: Schools & h/a

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

The federal regulations of IDEA say that schools are responsible to ensure that hearing aids are functioning properly. It does not require schools to purchase them. However, depending on the state regulations this may be possible.

Document 6 of 25

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Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Linda Semesky

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

But there's more, I have to find it...but it basically says that assistive technology must go home if it is necessary for the child to benefit from a free appropriate education...if the team says it should. That is why Alex got to take his ALD home this year. Tho, now they've received some bad advice and are trying to renege for next year.

What gets my goat is that the school systems send communication boards home for children who can't talk and I just found out our county has paid thousands of dollars for special vision goggles for a child who only has peripheral vision. These same systems refuse to provide hearing aids to children who can't hear. So, they will help a child who can't talk, a child who can't see but they refuse to accommodate a child who can't hear....I think that they have been getting away with this too long. There has to be equity..either support all type of impairments or none! And, I've reached my threshhold of being told that accommodations don't have to be made for Alex because "he hears surprisingly well!" They have and continue to treat him as a child with a language delay, not a hearing impairment. And, the audiologist keeps identifying him as having unilateral hearing loss, with minor high freq loss in the good ear. In reality, he has bilateral hearing loss. Profound in R ear, mild to profound high frequency in his left. Makes a big difference when you look at him that way! The county's own audiologist has finally put in writing that Alex has trouble hearing in background noise...after we forced him to by bringing in the professor who taught him audiology to support the testing the professor did. Despite this concession, the audiologist still only recommends an ALD and no acoustic modification...yet they have it in the self-contained classrooms for hoh which have only 6 students and a sound field for the entire class. Yet, Alex doesn't need it when he's in a class of 25 children with no sound field and only the fm unit. Very interesting to me! When I mentioned this, he said that the only reason that the self-contained classroom had drapes and acoustical tile was because it used to be a music room! Well, then I guess Alex's first grade needs to locate in the music room at his school too!

I have been one of the most cooperative, team-playing parents trying to work with the school system. I still am, but I'm putting my foot down. I am tired of Alex going to special presentations and not having the presenter use his ALD because it's not convenient or they haven't prearranged how it would work. Or, he goes to watch a movie with the school (ex., last day of school was Babe), and it's not closed captioned even though there is a captioned version available. "Gee, we're sorry Mrs. Semesky, but we'll have the classroom aide sit next to Alex with his ALD and interpret parts he misses." The ALD should have been wired into the TV, not kept by the aide. And, because he reads at the fourth grade level, he should have had closed captioning. Now that I've analyzed ADA, I realize that they've been grossly violating his rights for years and don't even realize it.

So much of what I am encountering is ignorance of the regulations. IEP development is a joke and there is minimal parental involvement though they listen to me more than anyone and I've never been wrong when I have dug in my heels and insisted that they do something. For example, they wanted to keep him in the self-contained classroom for language impaired children this year and gradually introduce him into Kindergarten at midyear. I said, no way! If he was going to be in Kindergarten, he was going to go in on day 1 and learn the rules and make friends. Children would then accept his disability much more readily because they would all be new and get to know him as a person. If he came in at midyear, he would have no idea what the rules/procedures were and would have a hard time acclimating. And, his differences would be much more apparent as he would also stand out as a new kid who didn't fit in because of his lack of knowledge about procedures and group dynamics of the classroom. Well, they knew I would fight, so they agreed to try it and they were all AMAZED how successful he's been and how integrated. He had no behavioral issues whereas some of the "normal" children were on behavior plans.

Sorry to ramble on and I'm not upset with you AT ALL! I am just very frustrated by a system that just doesn't get it! They have no clue what Alex is dealing with as a hoh child. Because he does rather well communicating one-on-one in a quiet room, they think that he hears fine. I have mild hearing loss myself and I KNOW WHAT NOISE DOES! It's horrible! And, you can't hear anything clearly! Even when you can, it's only because you are concentrating intensely using all of your energy to hear. How fair is it to force someone to learn like that when there are other options....IT'S NOT! And, no matter how much documentation I provide, they still don't get it! However, it is not unique to him. The other mothers in the support group I started all have the same issues. As do the adults in the SHHHH local SHHHH organization and another Listserve I am part of. So, I will fight...yes fight....because being the nice, cooperative parent is not working. And, I've told the school principal that I appreciate her efforts and it's nothing personal but I have to do this for my son to make the system work! Otherwise, he will fall through the cracks and fail!

Anyway....guess you didn't expect this kind of reply to a short little question...hope I didn't fill your inbox full .

Linda S.

Document 7 of 25

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Date: Mon, 24 Jun 1996 10:13:48 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: John & Robin Henne

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I think you have a good point there. Over several years as an educational consultant for schools with deaf/hh students, I have found that children, especially younger children, don't have any particular problem with a deaf or hard of hearing child in their midst. We lend FM systems to some schools, and as part of the process of placing the kids, this includes talking about hearing loss and what it means in an everyday way. Especially in kindergarten and the lower grades, a lot of kids have had or are still having chronic middle ear problems, and will agree that at least some of the time they don't hear well either. That gives us a basis for talking about how to help communication with the d/hh child; talk face-to-face, talk to him/her close up, not across the room, etc. We also talk about why hearing aids don't make everything great - "hearing aids make sounds louder - the problem is that hearing aids make ALL sounds louder, and the sounds closer to the hearing aid will be louder than sounds further away." Using a stethoscope, we let those who want to listen to the FM receiver "just this one time" and we talk about that. What we've found happens is that kids have a chance to compare experiences and ask questions, and it builds a support group of interested kids for the one using all this technology. So now if some kid on the playground asks a question or makes a crack, the d/hh kid isn't on his/her own - there's a bunch of kids to help respond.

> Sorry to ramble on and I'm not upset with you AT ALL! I am just very frustrated by a system that just doesn't get it! They have no clue what Alex is dealing with as a hoh child. Because he does rather well communicating one-on-one in a quiet room, they think that he hears fine. I have mild hearing loss myself and I KNOW WHAT NOISE DOES! It's horrible! And, you can't hear anything clearly! Even when you can, it's only because you are concentrating intensely using all of your energy to hear. How fair is it to force someone to learn like that when there are other options....IT'S NOT! And, no matter how much documentation I provide, they still don't get it!

Have you tried any of the simulated hearing loss tapes? There's a (by now pretty old but still good) record from Zenith called "Getting Through" that includes a couple of bands of simulated hearing loss at different levels. The "Unfair Spelling Test" is my favorite, being a perverse sort of person - it requires listeners to take a spelling test of 10 words, filtered to simulate severe, moderate, and mild high frequency hearing loss. There's also a homemade videotape illustrating the benefit of using an FM system -I believe it's from the University of Connecticut, made by one of Toni Maxon's grad classes. I'm at home now and don't have specific information available - if you like, email for details and I'll see what I can find.

Don't give up!

Robin

Document 8 of 25

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Date: Mon, 24 Jun 1996 21:57:21 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Linda Semesky

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Chris,

You're right, it would be easier. However, at $1500+ (School's Price)for Alex's Phonic Ear Free Ear ALD and over $4000 for the programmable bicross hearing aid configuration that might fit Alex. And the need to probably get a new aid a couple of years down the road as his hearing changes. And, the cost of maintenance on the unit, esp if it is used in a school setting where the teachers don't have a vested interest in supporting it and protecting it, this becomes a major financial burden. And yes, if the law were not there and the school systems were not supporting the needs of other children with other handicaps, then we would bite the bullet and buy one for him. As our out of pocket of his medical bills have run in the $5,000-7,500 per year range since he was born almost six years ago, we cannot afford to be casual about another $5500+. And, for those of you who say the parents should pay part of the burden...you know you're right...in a perfect society. But when I see all of the waste of tax funds for social services for undeserving people, it doesn't bother me to try to get some for my son who may otherwise have to do with much less. And, when special ed can buy its staff new computers when it doesn't need them, repave its parking lot and increase its management at the expense of services directly provided to children, then I say that the money is there! Even some of the support staff in special ed says the money is there! They just spend it in high profile cases which make them look good or for people with some clout. Well, I'm becoming one of those people with some clout...though in this case it won't be because of who I know! And, if Alex has an aid available to him 24 hours a day, I don't care who it belongs to!

Sorry if I sound angry when I respond to your replies. I enjoy your communications and take no offense. It's just the constant frustration of fighting for everything...especially for them to acknowledge the impact of his hearing loss.

So you have a good night...in the next week, I will be posting most of Alex's IEP that is specific to his hearing loss/speech needs to help some of the parents on board and maybe give teachers some ideas. I will also be sending the info to my parents group. We are hoping to exchange IEP wording so that we can develop an optimal IEP for our children. We hope to develop it into a guideline for IEPs for hoh children...some will also apply to deaf, but many issues are different.

Gotta run! Thanks for the reply and the good luck wishes!

Linda

Document 9 of 25

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Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 09:28:22 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Noelle Reimers

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In regards to the continuing discussion about hearing aids being provided by school systems...Here in Maryland (I'm a teacher of students who are D/hoh) we were informed at the beginning of the year by our audiologist that a neighboring county had indeed had parents requesting and receiving (eventually) school provision of hearing aids when listed as necessary Adaptive Materials on the IEP.

We usually list both Phonic Ear and hearing aids as Adaptive Materials on our IEPs for students who are hearing impaired. I wonder if as more parents take this route to get hearing aids provided, we will be instructed to only list the Phonic Ear, since it will provide the auditory access to the educational setting. (That would also bring up an interesting side point, since I have read on the list that parents of D/hoh children are requesting provision of Phonic Ears for use at home, and getting it. That would mean providing two sets of PE for each student, since students couldn't be depended on to bring the PE every day to school.)

BTW: I know next to nothing about health insurance/medical assistance laws/policies. However, I wonder why can't health insurance carriers be pressured by the D/hoh community to begin covering the provision of HAs, SINCE MEDICAL ASSISTANCE DOES COVER THEM???

Noelle Reimers
nreimers@eagle1.eaglenet.com

Document 10 of 25

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Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 10:26:10 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Linda Cobb 904 453-7425

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <9606251328.AA01911@eagle1.eaglenet.com>

On our IEP's it is not stated that the child needs aids. Instead it only states that FM equipment will be provided. I'm sure this is to protect the school system from having to provide each child's aids. Although I understand the financial burden placed on the family, I cannot imagine what would have to suffer if the system was required to provide each child's aids. What would your child lose in the meantime? Small classes if self-contained? Less speech and language services? Less contact with itinerent teachers? Realistically there is only so much money.You appear to be with it and know how to work the system to your child's advantage. That's great, but I think you should consider the impact on the total picture. Believe me I'm on your side. So many of our student's get aids through social services. Unfortunately those of us who have incomes foot the bill. One suggestion I do have for you. If you have a local barbershop group, they are particularly interested in local participation in the needs of HI. Sometimes they will do special fundraisers for a child or a group. As an educator I have found that they will usually give me about $500 a year. I can spend the money any way I want! Field trips, software, printers, etc....I always try to find local coverage of what they have contributed either through the paper or on TV.

Linda C.

Document 11 of 25

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Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 10:46:02 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Candace Krepel

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

It has been my experience that services expand and contract (more often contracting) according to availability of personnel and money. If there is not a full complement of speech pathologists, the number of minutes per week of speech for each child in the system goes down. The child's need has not decreased. It's just part of the game. Our parents now insist that number of minutes per week of speech be specified in the IEP.

Candy Krepel

Document 12 of 25

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Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 18:56:09 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: DeLores

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

A parent of a disabled child has a responsibility to advocate for that child and NOT to consider the impact on the total picture. So many of us in years past wasted a lot of time trying to consider the impact on the total picture. Our child's educational and access needs were not being met appropriately while we fussed around with the need to be liked by the school district. I learned it was better to be respected than to be liked by the time my kids graduated from high school.

DeLores Wilson
dhag@mtsi.com

Document 13 of 25

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Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 22:02:26 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: John & Robin Henne

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I didn't know that! Another source some parents have worked with is the local or statewide Lions Club. Historically Lions have supported projects for blind /visually handicapped, but several years ago they also took up support for deaf & hard of hearing. Several families that I know have gotten at least partial funding for hearing aids, tactile aids, camp, etc.

Another group to try, especially if you live in a rural area, is the Grange.

In our state at least, many towns have philanthropic foundations which support all kinds of local efforts, from hearing aids for kids to new band uniforms.

I've never found a written list of these kinds of sources, it's been mostly word-of-mouth from local residents. School nurses often know which groups can be approached for which kinds of assistance.

I think assistance from groups like these is so important. There is assistance to some extent for indigent families, but there's a B I G gap between poor enough to qualify for those funds and being able to pay out of pocket for a Free Ear system or Resound hearing aids, etc.

Robin

Document 14 of 25

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Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 22:03:40 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Because IMO a CI is viewed medically as a surgical cure for deafness. Hearing aids are seen as equipment to enable therapy such as speech therapy, and are not covered or are covered minimally under Durable Medical Equipment. Therapy and rehabilitation is seen as a bottomless pit whereas the CI is seen as a quick fix with a finite expense term.

Chris

<< Chris deHahn.....CdH.....System, Network, CAE Administrator >>
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Document 15 of 25

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Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 22:23:57 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I fit somewhere in the middle ground here. The IEP process is the art of compromise. It cannot be take, take, take and no give from either side. I choose to own my child's hearing aids just like I choose to own my own home (bank arguments aside ). Even if Patrick's school system was required by law to provide HA's for him, this is a battle I would not choose to fight at this time. However, there are other things that I will not bend on which are much more important to me. I'd rather choose my battles accordingly.

I do look beyond my own deaf child when negotiating his ed plan, because every extra dollar that I squeeze from the school system is one more reason for them to start their own program in house. This will impact my daughter down the road.

I am extremely fortunate to have an excellent working relationship with our SPED department. Some of this was blessed on us by their very nature, the rest of it was cultivated. Communication, compromise and understanding of each other's needs were the tools that created this environment.

Chris

<< Chris deHahn.....CdH.....System, Network, CAE Administrator >>
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Document 16 of 25

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Date: Wed, 26 Jun 1996 00:14:20 -0600

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: jmsimes@STTHOMAS.EDU

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <199606260223.WAA13360@mailserver1.tiac.net>

As a teacher who sees and hears about all kinds of issues from the parents' perspectives and the school district perspective and then has to deal with both because we teachers are the ones who do the work with the kids, I must say I truly appreciate parents who walk the middle ground as Chris does. School districts are hurting for money...anyway they sure are in Minnesota where I live. Special education does not mint it's own money, though maybe that's what needs to happen since our budget gets cut every year and we get more and more kids put on our roles who are more "needy" than ever before. Add the price of inflation and it's a no win situation. What we do individually DOES have an impact on the total picture and the future.

> I choose to own my child's hearing aids just like I choose to own my own home (bank arguments aside ). Even if Patrick's school system was required by law to provide HA's for him, this is a battle I would not choose to fight at this time. However, there are other things that I will not bend on which are much more important to me. I'd rather choose my battles accordingly.

> I do look beyond my own deaf child when negotiating his ed plan, because every extra dollar that I squeeze from the school system is one more reason for them to start their own program in house. This will impact my daughter down the road.

Ah, you are so right here Chris. I've seen it happen to the district I work for. When I started teaching there the program averaged between 70 -80 students from the metro area each year. As people became more savvy about what they could get from the IEP process, districts that used to buy into our services gradually began pulling out and setting up their own little programs regardless if they had the critical student mass or not. As a result, we now have many very small suburban programs and center city programs that are half the size they used to be. This makes options for everyone even more limited.

> I am extremely fortunate to have an excellent working relationship with our SPED department. Some of this was blessed on us by their very nature, the rest of it was cultivated. Communication, compromise and understanding of each other's needs were the tools that created this environment.

You can always catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.....:-) I applaud you for your efforts to try to make situations "win-win" rather than "win-lose" -- a very hard thing to do in an IEP process that by its very nature tends to set up adversarial relationships.

The one thing we all need to remember is that the IEP guarantees an appropriate education--not the "best" education or a world class education. Unfortunately, when we educate the masses as we do here in the US, there is more "average" everything than there is "top-notch" anything. Those who want the best end up footing more of the bill themselves in one way or another. It's one price we pay for considering and accepting that everyone has a right to an education at the public's expense.

I'm curious-- how many parents, parent advocacy groups, deaf community organizations, etc. have banded together to demand insurance companies pay their fair share of the expenses? Seems to me this is where some real changes need to be made, especially since there seems to be such disparity in the way companies do or do not remiburse for expenses.

Jolinda
jmsimes@stthomas.edu

Document 17 of 25

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Date: Wed, 26 Jun 1996 09:44:16 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Birgit Woelker

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I understand and respect both parts of the discussion whether or not the school has to provide hearing aids. I like to throw in my experience from Germany which I thought was quite nice. All the children who needed hearing aids were aided immediately with hearing aids by the closest Center of the hard of hearing or school for the deaf. These aids had been loaner aids to the family to try out the most appropriate set of aids. After the decision which aids are the "best fit", a set of aids was purchased and fully covered by the health insurance or medicaid. If the child needed different aids after a couple of years the center wrote a letter to the insurance stating why an additional set of aids was considered necessary. Aids that would not be used anylonger (e.g. because the child got a cochlear implant) were given to the Center of the hoh at no charge. The same procedure was true for FM systems.

1) First of all the aids (if needed according to the IEP) were covered by the health insurance.

2) The "recycling" system was unique and can save quite a lot of money. The aids that might not be powerful enough for your child might be appropriate for another child.

3) Professionals (teacher of the deaf or speech pathologists) had some idea which FM system can be used for hearing aids and CI's. That means that the FM trainer if not needed any longer can go to a different school and is compatible with an already existing one.

4) The family was not alone expressing the childs needs. Letters from the school from the deaf were usually respected by the insurance.

Birgit
birgit@asterix.bio.sunysb.edu

Document 18 of 25

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Date: Wed, 26 Jun 1996 09:32:46 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Candace Krepel

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: <199606260156.SAA22020@server.mtsi.com>

Amen, Delores. The boys basketball team will always be more important than the girls field hockey team; the computer center will get new CD-Rom drives before the chemistry department gets a new balance; and the needs of ex ed kids will always be on the bottom of the priority list. That is why the laws were necessary in the first place. The idea is to recognize that, in the long run, providing services to ex ed students is in the best interests of *all* of society. Anything a child can be taught to do for himself is something society doesn't have to pay someone to do for him his entire life. If appropriate intervention can allow a child to participate in the economy as an adult, that adult is now paying taxes, not living off SSI. That is the benefit to society. And I haven't even mentioned the benefit to society of having happy, responsible, fulfilled citizens.

Candy Krepel

Document 19 of 25

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Date: Thu, 27 Jun 1996 09:12:07 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Linda Semesky

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Noelle wrote:

>Here in Maryland (I'm a teacher of students who are D/hoh) we were informed at the beginning of the year by our audiologist that a neighboring county had indeed had parents requesting and receiving (eventually) school provision of hearing aids when listed as necessary Adaptive Materials on the IEP.

Hi Noelle, glad to talk to you again! Do you know which county this is?

>We usually list both Phonic Ear and hearing aids as Adaptive Materials on our IEPs for students who are hearing impaired. I wonder if as more parents take this route to get hearing aids provided, we will be instructed to only list the Phonic Ear, since it will provide the auditory access to the educational setting.

The problem is that there is more to the educational setting than being able to hear the teacher. The child also has to hear the other students which is hard to do in noise. With the cooperative learning that is used by educators now, it is critical that the child hear the other children, not just the teacher as a significant part of their learning now comes from other students. So, an ALD is no longer enough! (That would also bring up an interesting side point, since I have read on the list that parents of D/hoh children are requesting provision of Phonic Ears for use at home, and getting it. That would mean providing two sets of PE for each student, since students couldn't be depended on to bring the PE every day to school.)

Alex did not miss one day of having his auditory trainer at school. It was packed up every night and put in his bookbag to take along. Though I know many parents would not be so responsible. I would like to note though, that the decision for HA/ALDs to go home are all made on a case by case basis and there is no precedent for doing it generically across the board.

>BTW: I know next to nothing about health insurance/medical assistance laws/policies. However, I wonder why can't health insurance carriers be pressured by the D/hoh community to begin covering the provision of HAs, SINCE MEDICAL ASSISTANCE DOES COVER THEM???

Good point Noelle...another battle to fight...right now the deaf/hoh lobby is too divided between cultures to coordinate its efforts and fight. The internet seems to be changing that and as more deaf/hoh can join ranks the more they will fight back, esp with the insurance carriers. The insurance companies have one of the strongest lobbies in the US. So, right now, people like me have enough to fight and think that we can use the regs to get what our kids need....and, this is the no.1 priority for us because it is the survival of our kids!

I'll tell my parents group that you're still alive out there!

Linda S.

Document 20 of 25

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Date: Thu, 27 Jun 1996 20:44:44 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Fortunately, Massachusetts extends the federal law to provide a FAPE with the 'maximum feasible benefit'. This allows us to get the best education for our children with cost issues secondary. It's one reason I choose to stay here. However, there is a responsibility to consider the other side. Many parents have taken an extreme position and the 'MFB' is going to be challenged this year at the State House.

There is legislative movement here too, but we are a low incidence disability and thus don't get much attention from the medical field. Quite the contrary from the political field.

Every time I've seen movement in the medical field to cover deafness related expenses it has been driven from one of two fronts...elderly rights groups or individual parents of deaf children with big bucks lawyers.

Chris

<< Chris deHahn.....CdH.....System, Network, CAE Administrator >>
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Document 21 of 25

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Date: Wed, 26 Jun 1996 21:43:00 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Linda Semesky

Subject: Hearing aid from school....moot point now!

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Well, we just reconvened discussions with one of Alex's private audiologists, Dr. Vic Gladstone of Towson State Univ. He said that at this point, only a bicross might help Alex and that he concurred with most of the rest of the profession that at Alex's age, he would probably be unwilling to deal with it. As numerous audiologists have all seemed to agree that there is really no hearing aid to fit Alex's hearing loss in his good ear, and the right ear has no usable hearing, then our only option is the auditory trainer. So, we will be focusing our efforts on ensuring that this continues to go home next year and on fighting for acoustic modification to the classroom. We have found portable pads that can be hung on the wall and moved from classroom to classroom each year. The entire modification would cost from $3,000-5,000. Divide that by all of the 5 years of elementary and that's cheap!

I have been fighting the battle for Alex to receive sign for two years now, ever since he started to become oral at age 3-1/2 and gave up sign because he wanted speech. Alex had congenital CMV and is at high risk of going deaf through puberty and even adulthood. This year he had a 25 db drop at 3000 hz. The school system keeps refusing, saying he is oral despite written recommendations from the school psychologist that Alex receive part of his education both signed and voiced. We don't want him to get caught off-guard like so many late-deafened adults and have to learn a language out of desperation instead of being prepared and comfortable with signing in case there's a loss. Well, the school only offers to teach him survival signs for his safety. What do you all think. Last year, the itinerant teacher for the HI convinced me that if we tried to teach Alex sign and kept him oral that it would delay his assimilation of oral language and slow him down. Well, the more I think about it and research this, I disagree. I grew up bilingual in German and English and though sometimes I would call things using both words, it sure never slowed down my acquisition of either language. What did slow it down was moving to the states and having my older sister refuse to speak it and my parents gave in! This is the same way I feel about sign. When Alex left the Infant and Toddler Program and started in the special education program at age 2-3/4, he had 200 signs and 8 garbled words. At the end of the year, he spoke 4-5 word strings and refused to sign. He has now forgotten all except for the few behavior signs I use...stop! now! quiet! eat! etc. My gut instinct tells me that he has to be comfortable in both the hearing and deaf worlds and he can't be truly comfortable unless he grows up comfortable with both languages. I finally realized now that the reason he stopped signing when he was younger was that he had significant fine motor issues and it was harder for him than talking...most of those have resolved and he is now in a much better position to learn to sign and should also be more willing if he is not taught in isolation and has others to use it with. Our point to the school is that there are places like gym, the playground, noisy group time, where Alex won't be able to hear the other children or adults no matter if he has an ALD or not. So, why not give him the extra tool of sign to understand what is being said. And as so many schools teach sign language as enrichment activities for their elementary school children, why couldn't this be integrated into such an activity?

Comments?

Linda S.

Document 22 of 25

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Date: Mon, 1 Jul 1996 11:30:46 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: John & Robin Henne

Subject: Re: Hearing aid from school....moot point now!

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I think it should be, for all of the reasons you mention. Because under the best of circumstances (and when do those occur) he doesn't hear clearly, assimilation of language and therefore of information has to be impacted. However oral he is and however good his speechreading and auditory closure skills, there must be times when he misses pieces. Getting information through speechreading, and/or auditorially through a hearing loss, requires very small group interaction with good acoustic and visual conditions - does this describe any regular school classroom? In a number of years of teaching, then consulting, in a variety of situations, I've seen several kids who use ASL or signed English interpreters in the classroom in order to access all of the information, but who then chose most of the time to respond orally. Some of them did remarkable code-switching very young, depending on the skills of the person to whom they were talking. I believe that signing supports language acquisition, and since he is in the midst of a lot of hearing talking people use of sign is unlikely to interfere with his development of speech skills. In fact, improved language skills should improve speech skills. IMHO>

Robin

Document 23 of 25

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Date: Mon, 1 Jul 1996 22:23:30 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: Hearing aid from school....moot point now!

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

That's always been our philosophy. Even though Patrick goes to an oral school, he was raised with sign. He was code switching strongly at 3.5 years old. When he has middle ear involvement, which he has often, and his hearing is degraded, he relies more on sign and face to face lipreading than when his hearing is good. At a minimum, sign language skills are a great communication tool for difficult environments, and when you add in the cultural side of sign language it is hard not to see the multitude of benefits that even minimal fluency in sign provides.

Chris

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Document 24 of 25

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Date: Thu, 25 Jul 1996 09:40:34 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christi McMillian

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

There is a Masonic organization called the International Order of Job's Daughters who have a program they call the HIKE Fund (Hearing Impaired Kids Endownent Fund) where they raise money to help provide children with hearing aids. If anyone needs any information on it let me know and I'll find out who you need to contact about receiving the funds.

Christi
cmcmillian@vabch.com

Document 25 of 25

Information Home PageDeaf Education Home Page Document: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Date: Wed, 14 Aug 1996 10:46:02 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Christi McMillian

Subject: Re: Hearing aid provided by school

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I looked around and found an address that should be of some help. Just write them requesting information on recieving funds from the HIKE Fund. If this isn't the exact address they should be able to point you in the right direction. I hope it is of some help.

International Center For Job's Daughters
233 W. 6th Street
Papillion, Nebraska 68046

Christi
(cmcmillian@vabch.com)

Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Eduction Major