Edudeaf: d/Deaf et.al.

Key words: Curriculum Materials/Deaf Culture/K-12

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Date: Wed, 3 Jul 1996 13:13:33 PST

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

From: Timothy R Friend

Subject: d/Deaf et. al.

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi, all

First of all, I was wondering if someone could explain the difference between deaf and Deaf as it is mentioned on this list but especially on the bit.listserv.deaf-l newsgroup. There have been some lively discussions lately about d/Deaf culture and the small "d" and big "D" are thrown around quite a bit.

Second, (and I am sure there are about as many different answers to this as there are people doing the answering), what is the best way for an adult with little exposure to ASL to learn the language? My 2-year old son has enough residual hearing to benefit greatly from hi-tech hearing aids and will probably function very well in the hearing ("H"earing?) world. Because of this, he is attending an oral program at our local school. However technology does have its drawbacks and communication can be very difficult with him when he is in the bathtub or a swimming pool (does anyone know of any waterproof hearing aids? ;-) ). I am sure there are many ways to learn (i.e. books, community ed. programs, computer software, etc.), I am just looking for what has worked for other people. I also have a five-year old with normal hearing and it would be nice to involve him in this type of education as well.

Tim

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Date: Wed, 3 Jul 1996 21:37:01 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Christofer deHahn

Subject: Re: d/Deaf et. al.

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

From a Deaf adult. Try your local college or university if there is one nearby, also any Deaf club or organization in your area. At last resort would be the Dawn Sign Press 'Signing Naturally' videotape series, but there is no replacement for learning it firsthand from a live individual, preferably a native Deaf person.

Chris

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Date: Thu, 4 Jul 1996 17:41:05 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Mbeany@AOL.COM

Subject: Re: d/Deaf et. al.

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Timothy Friend wrote:

"First of all, I was wondering if someone could explain the difference between deaf and Deaf as it is mentioned on this list but especially on the bit.listserv.deaf-l newsgroup. There have been some lively discussions lately about d/Deaf culture and the small "d" and big "D" are thrown around quite a bit."

Capital "D" stands is for someone who is culturally deaf. Small d someone with a profound hearing loss that is not culturally deaf. The question is where to draw the line whether one is culturally deaf or not.

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Date: Mon, 8 Jul 1996 12:28:17 -0700

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: Mark Protus

Subject: Re: d/Deaf et. al.

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

- What is the best way for an adult with little exposure to ASL to learn the language?

I like the Bravo Family tapes from Sign Enhancers (1-800-767-4461) because of the way they integrate a deaf family in family types of situations (finding the remote control for the TV, having a picnic, going food shopping, etc.) while using all of the vocabulary necessary to communicate. There are also cultural notes on each tape that are quite helpful.

Even though videos are better than books to learn sign language, you'll also need to get out to deaf events and interact with deaf people (sign language must be applied to learn). Good luck.

mark

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Date: Tue, 9 Jul 1996 17:47:54 EDT

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

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From: "LUCKER, JAY"

Subject: Re: d/Deaf et. al.

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In-Reply-To: In reply to your message of Wed, 03 Jul 1996 17:13:33 EDT

Tim,

About your question regarding the best way to learn ASL:

I feel that the best way to learn any language is to use the language.

That is, learn from whatever source you are able, preferably from a teacher who uses the language proficiently, and most preferably from a native "speaker"/user of the language. Then, immerse yourself in the language by using it as often as you can.

As for both of your children, you can merely use ASL with them either telling stories, in specific contexts (like at meals), signing songs, etc. so that they will get used to ASL.

I would assume that, as in most areas, there must be some schools or colleges or community colleges which offer a sign language course. Enroll in the beginning course, and learn.

Dr.J!

Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major