Council on Education of the Deaf

Office of Program Evaluation

 

 

 

 

 

Manual II:

Procedures for the

Evaluation of Programs Preparing Teachers for Students Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manual Revised August 15, 1998

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

I. ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF AN APPROVABLE PROGRAM 1

II. PROCEDURES LEADING TO PROGRAM EVALUATION AND APPROVAL 2

III. PRELIMINARY SELF-EVALUATION CHECK LIST 3

IV. PROVISIONS PROVIDED FOR PROGRAM EVALUATION AND APPROVAL 5

V. GUIDE FOR PREPARING PROGRAM REPORT 5

VI. SUBMISSION OF PROGRAM REPORT 8

VII. SITE Visit PROCEDURES 9

1. Qualifications of Site Visit Team Members 9

2. Preparations for Site Visit 10

3. Preparation of Team Members 11

4. Conduct of the Site Visit 12

5. Responsibilities of Team Chair 12

6. Development of an Agenda for Site Visit 13

7. Preparation of Draft Site Visit Report 13

8. Recommendations of Site Visit Team 14

9. Evaluation Panel 14

10. Program Approvals and Re-approvals 15

ATTACHMENTS

ATTACHMENT I - CHECK LIST OF PROCEDURES FOR PROGRAM EVALUATION

ATTACHMENT II - PRELIMINARY REPORT

ATTACHMENT III - RECOMMENDED PROGRAM REPORT FORMS

 

PROGRAM EVALUATION MANUAL

The improvement and updating of programs for the professional preparation of teachers of deaf and hard of hearing children by colleges, universities, and school personnel is a continuous evolutionary process. Some of the causes that influence change include enlightenment, technological advances, research, personnel, financing, and others. The setting of standards as guidelines for the improvement of programs for preparing professional personnel is a concern shared by all who are involved in the education of these children.

The Conference of Executives of American Schools for the Deaf (CEASD) was the first professional group to develop and publish an agreed-upon set of minimum standards for preparing teachers to work in this field. The work of this organization dates from 1930 at a time when most preparation programs were school-centered inservice-type activities. CEASD then set up a mechanism for the review and approval of such programs which subsequently influenced university affiliation, adoption, and sponsorship.

I. ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF AN APPROVABLE PROGRAM

(Reference: CED Manual , Standards for Evaluation of Programs)

1. Should be sponsored and administered by an accredited institution of higher education.

2. Should have at least the equivalent of two full-time qualified (CED certified) persons on college or university appointment with appropriate professiorial rank in an existing department of the college or university. In graduate level programs, at least one member of this staff should have an earned doctorate.

3. Must offer a curriculum designed to provide students a level of competencies in an identifiable area of specialization as outlined by CED published standards, and in a defined category of program philosphy (i.e., either auditory-oral, comprehensive, or bilingual-bicultural).

4. Should be able to demonstrate a working affiliation with practicum facilities related to the stated area(s) of specialization.

5. Should have readily available demonstration and observation facilities nearby or on campus that relate to the program's area(s) of specialization.

6. Should have been in operation at least one year, have an appropriate number of students enrolled, and have identifiable requirements for student selection.

7. Should have sufficient and readily available professional library resources.

8. Should have access to other resources essential to teacher preparation (e.g., general education, special education, clinical services, media services).

9. Should have adequate physical facilities for the program on or near campus (e.g., classroom space; office space; conference area; seminar, work and study areas; etc.).

10. Should have a systematic and effective evaluation process including the location of graduates whose performance is evaluated.

11. Should have a clear statement of justification for its existence supported by evidence of manpower needs produced from a current survey conducted in the area served by the program (local, state, or national).

II. PROCEDURES LEADING TO PROGRAM EVALUATION AND APPROVAL

1. The institution requests from the CED Program Evaluation Office information regarding procedures.

2. This manual is sent to the requesting institution accompanied by CED Manual I, Standards for the Evaluation of Programs.

Within this manual are the following:

- Essential elements of an approvable program for the preparation of teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing.

- Preliminary Readiness Check List for a program seeking evaluation (Attachment II).

- Provisions for program evaluation.

- A guide for Preparing Program Report.

- Site visit procedures.

- CED qualifications and criteria for appointment of site visit teams.

- CED Site Visitor Team Evaluation Form.

NOTE: Attachment I or Ia is a ready-made checklist of procedures for each step in the program evaluation process.

III. PRELIMINARY SELF-EVALUATION CHECK LIST

(These are in addition to program requirements described on Pages 1 and 2 of this Manual.)

Prior to application for program approval by the CED, it is essential that institutions engage in self-evaluation to determine if they are ready for a site visit by CED. The following points must be considered. Several of these are deemed essential prior to approval by CED. Others, while not absolutes, represent the judgement of CED as valid and necessary. It is strongly recommended that they be included.

1. Does the college or university hold national or regional accreditation? The college or university MUST hold such accreditation prior to CED approval.

2. Does the college or university currently employ one person to coordinate the program?

One person MUST be employed by the university to coordinate the program. This person will have the following:

a. Certification as a teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing as evidenced by possession of a valid CED professional certificate.

b. At least three years of experience as a teacher of deaf and hard of hearing children or youth.

c. An earned doctorate or evidence of being near completion of work toward a doctorate. (This is required if the program is at the graduate level.)

d. A professorial (assistant, associate, or full professor) rank at the college or university.

3. In addition to the person specified above, there are additional personnel employed by the university to teach courses and supervise practicum in the area of the deaf and hard of hearing.

Sufficient program personnel must be employed to reach the equivalent of at least two full-time persons. Personnel engaged in teaching special education or general speech and hearing courses do not meet this requirement unless they teach core courses* in education of the deaf and hard of hearing or course selections which are designed for students in the program.

4. Are sufficient courses and practicum experiences available to insure that students meet the competencies outlined by CED? The program MUST specialize in one or more areas of teaching (multi-handicapped, preschool, elementary, etc.). The program must provide adequate coursework and practicum specific to each area of specialization as well as general education of the deaf and hard of hearing.

5. Is the program affiliated with one or more practicum facilities appropriate for the program philosophy, and the level(s) and specialization(s) offered?

Sufficient practicum must be available to insure that each student will have ample opportunity to observe, participate, and teach in a program for the deaf and hard of hearing under the direct supervision of certified cooperating teachers with regular field supervision by college university personnel.

Practicum must be appropriate to the area(s) of specialization offered by the college or university.

At least one practicum facility appropriate to each area of specialization or level of preparation should be located within a reasonable distance from the site at which methods courses are taught.

6. Does the program have adequate office space, work space, research facilities and secretarial services available to insure that faculty members can meet the commitments to students and continue to develop professionally?

7. Are sufficient library materials and resources available to allow students and faculty access to past and current professional literature in education of the deaf and hard of hearing, speech and hearing, special education, regular education, and all related areas?

8. The institution submits to the CED Program Evaluation Office the following:

a. A narrative indicating that the program meets prerequisites for an evaluation, as determined by AEssential Elements of an Approvable Program,@ and APreliminary Self-Evaluation Checklist,@ in preceding sections of this manual.

    1. A completed Preliminary Report, which includes a one-paragraph program description for the CED web site.

NOTE: Attachment II, "Preliminary Report" should be used for the initial report to the CED Program Evaluation Office.

*Core courses refer to the thirty-six semester hours requirement for Provisional Certification, CED Standards for Certification of Teachers of the Deaf and hard of hearing.

IV. PROVISIONS FOR PROGRAM EVALUATION

1. The CED Program Evaluation Office evaluates the submitted materials and recommends to the institution:

 

M Deferral of the program evaluation for an indefinite or specified period of time;

or

M Need for clarification of information or the need for additional information before a decision regarding the evaluation can be made;

or

MContinuation of the process leading toward program evaluation.

2. The appropriate institution official submits to the CED Program Evaluation Office a letter officially requesting an evaluation of the program for the preparation of teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing.

At this time, the institution officially acknowledges its willingness to assume the expenses of one or more site visitors who are individually approved by CED. Payment of $500.00 by the institution to CED is agreed upon, payable following submission of the full Program Report.

3. The institution prepares and completes its Program Report in accordance with the guide for preparing the Program Report (below).

V. GUIDE FOR PREPARING PROGRAM REPORT

General Information

The institution's Program Report must follow the format in Standards for the Evaluation of Programs, (CED Manual I).

Some questions in the "Standards" document may appear to be redundant and/or inapplicable in particular reporting situations. In these cases, either cross-referencing or inserting a simple statement of lack of applicability is desirable and appropriate.

Forms are included for your convenience in reporting data.

Suggested Outline Format: Introduction

1. Program Curriculum and Practicum

2. Program Faculty

3. Students

4. Facilities

5. Evaluation Review and Planning

Summary

Introduction

M Provide a brief description of the institution, indicating its primary goals and objectives, the general nature and characteristics of the overall student body, and the major role of the institution in its area of service to the state or region. Include very briefly general statistics and descriptions about students, faculty, departments, or division, in order to provide a general picture of the institution within which the program is housed.

M Review current accreditation status of the institution including accreditation status of the teacher education division of the institution.

M Discuss the institution's philosophy regarding education of the deaf and hard of hearing and personnel preparation, its conception of the role of the teacher, and its program objectives.

M Describe generally the operational aspects of the program for the preparation of teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing including where the program functions with respect to the administrative organizational structure of the institution and the relationships the program has with other divisions and disciplines within the institution.

M Describe briefly the history of the program including dates, periods of interruptions or lapses in the program's history, if any, the reasons for lapse periods, numbers of students who have completed the program, the general geographic area of service where students generally find employment, and types of programs in which students have found employment.

M Describe the scope of the program including area or areas of specialization, academic level (graduate, undergraduate, or both), divisions within the institution involved with the program, and the facilities used for observation and practicum aspects of the program.

1. Program Curriculum and Practicum

a. Order the discussion of the curriculum in keeping with that found in CED Manual I. Be sure to address the questions relating to each of the standards.

b. Include as an attachment to the report a curriculum exhibit showing the sequence of courses offered by semesters or quarters, courses required, and courses offered as electives. List the course numbers, course titles, and credit for each.

c. Attach a course outline and syllabus for each required course.

d. Practicum: Describe the manner in which practicum experience and sites meet the standards stated in CED Manual I, under 1.4.

If for any reason the program cannot be described in the manner suggested in Items b and c above, substitute whatever kind of summary that will describe the program clearly enough for program evaluation purposes.

2. Program Faculty

a. Discuss the manner in which your faculty meets the standards as stated in CED Manual I, Items 2.1-2.4.

b. Prepare a data sheet for each member of the faculty involved administratively and operationally with the program. Use separate sheets for each faculty member. (Recommended format use Form #2 Attachment III.)

(1) Name, rank, title, level at which teaching is performed, and date of appointment.

(2) Earned college degrees and fields of study.

(3) Teaching experience, including levels, types of programs, years of service, and in what programs.

(4) Teaching load (different courses taught, advising, supervision, other responsibilities).

(5) Professional and academic association memberships.

(6) Non-teaching professional activities.

(7) Publications.

(8) Current research and/or writing projects.

 

3. Students

a. Prepare responses to standards stated in CED Manual I, Items 3.1-3.4, relating to students.

4. Facilities

a. Discuss the manner in which your facilities adhere to the standards as stated in CED Manual I, Items 4.1-4.3.

5. Evaluation Review and Planning

a. Discuss the manner in which program planning and review of evaluation data and review meet the standards stated in CED Manual I, Items 5.1-5.3.

 

Summary

Summary statements may be made at the end of each section or collectively at the end of the report as a separate section if desired and considered essential or helpful by the reporting institution. The purpose of this section would be to synthesize, further amplify certain aspects or special features of the program, or provide any additional information considered helpful to readers of the report.

VI. SUBMISSION OF PROGRAM REPORT

1. The institution, upon completing the full Program Report, (generally requiring two or three months) submits three (3) copies to the CED Program Evaluation Office at least 45 days prior to the date of the site visit.

2. The CED Program Evaluation Office evaluates the submitted materials and recommends to the institution:

M Deferral of the program evaluation for an indefinite period or a specified period of time;

or

M Need for clarification of information or the need for additional information before a decision regarding the evaluation can be made;

or

M Continuation of the process leading toward program site visit and final evaluation.

VII. SITE Visit PROCEDURES

In consideration of the necessity for professional evaluation and analysis, the Program Evaluation Office recognizes the importance and essential character of site visits. The direct examination of programs by qualified professionals serves as the basis for the development and improvement of educational opportunity for the deaf and hard of hearing. The program evaluation which is accomplished through site visits is to provide an objective, comprehensive, and explicit basis for subsequent recommendations by the Council on Education of the Deaf.

NOTE: Attachment IV will be used by site visit team members as a review and reporting check list. It is included in this manual as a source of information to program personnel as well as members of the site visit team.

1. QUALIFICATIONS OF SITE VISIT TEAM MEMBERS

Team For CED Evaluation

Each site visit team appointed to evaluate a program must be chaired by a currently qualified and actively employed teacher educator. No less than two persons are to serve on a site visit team. The size and complexity of a program will determine the number of persons to serve on site visit teams. The selection of other qualified members to serve on the team will also be governed by the nature of the program to be reviewed.

Qualifications of Teacher Educator Panelists

a. An earned doctorate.

b. Holds a valid CED Professional Certificate.

c. Is currently employed in a CED approved teacher preparation program (part-time or full-time).

Other Professional Personnel

Other professional persons serving on site visit teams could be:

a. Administrative or supervisory personnel in schools or classes for the deaf and hard of hearing.

b. Persons engaged in vocational training or rehabilitation activities for the deaf and hard of hearing.

c. Persons involved in research relating to the education of the deaf and hard of hearing.

d. Psychiatrists, psychologists, audiologists, or other professionals actively engaged in providing services to the deaf and hard of hearing.

e. Classroom teachers and media specialists involved in programs for the deaf and hard of hearing.

f. For programs preparing teachers of multiply handicapped deaf and hard of hearing children and youth, special educators qualified in one or more areas of education for the multiply handicapped deaf and hard of hearing.

g. General curriculum specialists at early childhood, elementary, or secondary levels.

It is suggested that professional persons asked to serve on site visit teams representing all above categories, with the possible exception of Item e., have doctoral or specialist level degrees.

Qualifications of Panelist

a. An earned doctorate.

b. Holds a valid CED Professional Certificate.

c. Is currently employed in a CED approved teacher preparation program (full- or part-time).

d. Is included on NCATE list of approved panelists.

2. PREPARATIONS FOR SITE Visit

CED Only

During the time the full Program Report is being prepared by the institution, final decisions are made by the CED Program Evaluation Office regarding the size and composition of the site visit team (minimum of two) as well as the visitation dates. The following procedures are to be followed:

a. Utilizing the Preliminary Report and other available information, the CED Program Evaluation Office submits to the program director a list of approximately six potential site visitors.

b. The program director indicates approval or disapproval for each potential visitor proposed. No explanations are required.

c. The CED Program Evaluation Office then selects the site visit team from the approved list and, in consultation with the program director and team members, sets the final visitation dates.

The program director, in consultation with the CED Program Evaluation Office , sets tentative dates for the two- to three-day site visit, taking into account the schedules and calendar of the institution so as to avoid time conflicts with examinations, vacations, and periods when students and/or faculty are not available.

3. PREPARATION OF TEAM MEMBERS

Each team member shall have a thorough familiarity with and understanding of:

a. CED Standards for the Certification of Teachers of the Deaf and hard of hearing.

b. Standards for the Evaluation of Programs for the Preparation of Teachers of the Deaf and hard of hearing (CED Manual I).

c. Guidelines for the Preparation of Program Reports (Page 5 in this Manual).

d. Instructions for the Preparation of Site Visit Reports (Page 13 in this Manual).

Each team member shall have, prior to the site visit, read the report prepared by the institution. It is imperative that each team member be familiar with the report. Notes shall be prepared on items for verification and clarification. Team members shall consider which individuals are to be interviewed.

4. CONDUCT OF THE SITE VISIT

a. Team members shall arrive on site the evening prior to the scheduled site visit. This is essential in order that each team member receives proper orientation and is ready to begin his/her assignments the following morning.

b. The team Chair shall convene the team in executive session to complete the following:

(1) To determine that each team member has completed assignments in Section 3 above.

(2) To identify issues and concerns of team members with respect to the Program Report.

(3) To assign specific tasks and areas of responsibility to individual team members.

c. The institution should NOT schedule any social activities for the site visit team.

d. A brief orientation session should be held with the institutional representatives during the evening prior to the site visit.

e. The institutional representatives should make all arrangements for meals, transportation, housing, work rooms, and interview areas.

5. RESPONSIBILITIES OF TEAM Chair

The responsibilities of the team Chair include:

a. Convene the team in executive session the evening prior to the site visit and complete all activities as described above.

b. Develop an agenda for the site visit as described later in this section.

c. Convene the team in executive session at the conclusion of the site visit to insure that all objectives have been reached.

d. Assign responsibilities for the preparation of the report.

e. Prepare the final copy of the site visit report. (Using the Site Visit Evaluation Form, Attachment IV, is acceptable as a major portion of the Site Visit Report.)

f. Submit final report to CED Program Evaluation Office within twenty (20) days.

6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AGENDA FOR SITE VISITATION

The agenda shall include, but not be limited to, the following activities:

a. Interview of all faculty and staff members identified in the Program Report plus other selected persons.

b. Interview of a reasonable sample of students presently enrolled in the program.

c. Interview with department head, dean, and related resource personnel.

d. Interview with director(s) of student teaching/practicum program components.

e. Examine evidence of the quality of performance by program graduates and students currently enrolled in program.

f. Examine evidence that the program provides students with the minimal competencies stated in the CED Standards for the Certification of Teachers of the Deaf and hard of hearing.

g. Determine through direct observation and visitation that program resources and facilities meet requirements specified in CED Standards for the Approval of Programs.

h. Hold an exit interview with appropriate personnel to allow for any additional data or information deemed necessary for a complete and accurate evaluation process.

7. PREPARATION OF DRAFT SITE VISIT REPORT

a. The team Chair is responsible for all aspects of report preparation. He/She shall assign writing tasks to team members.

b. The draft Site Visit Report shall be completed prior to the departure of the team members. (Attachment IV. Site Visit Evaluation Form, may be used as the body of the report.)

c. The team Chair will revise and edit the draft report. Prior to this step, all individually prepared report components shall be distributed to team members for review and revision.

d. The team Chair shall submit the final report to the Program Evaluation Office within twenty (20) working days after the site visit.

e. The CED Program Evaluation Office shall distribute to the team members copies of the final Site Visit Report as well as the decisions rendered by the Evaluation Panel.

8. RECOMMENDATIONS OF SITE VISIT TEAM

a. Within twenty (20) days after the site visit, the team Chair submits a final report of the site visit team to the CED Program Evaluation Office.

b. Upon receiving the report from the site visit team, the CED Program Evaluation Office forwards a copy to the program director of the institution who, in turn, may prepare and forward a response to the CED Program Evaluation Office within two weeks.

c. The CED Program Evaluation Office will provide copies of the following documents to each member of the Evaluation Panel:

(1) The completed Program Report of the institution.

(2) The report of the site visit team.

(3) The program director's responses to the site visit team.

These materials are to be reviewed by the Evaluation Panel members either at home or at a study and review session prior to the meeting of the Evaluation Panel.

9. EVALUATION PANEL

As stated in 8.c, the Evaluation Panel received copies of the completed Program Report of the institution, the report of the site visit team, and any responses received from the program director.

a. The Evaluation Panel meets and, using the various reports as a basis, determines whether program approval shall be conferred or denied. In some instances a decision may be postponed until certain clarifications are made or certain conditions are met.

b. The Chair of the Evaluation Panel notifies the CED Program Evaluation Office, the program director, and the site visit team in writing of its decision. If approval is not granted, the notification document will contain reasons for denial or conditions to be met before the program can be reconsidered for approval.

c. If program approval has been deferred, the program may submit to the CED Program Evaluation Office its responses to the conditions specified at least thirty (30) days prior to the next meeting of the Evaluation Panel, at which time the approval shall be reconsidered.

d. In the event the institution disagrees with the decision of the Evaluation Panel, an appeal can be made to the CED Program Evaluation Office. The appeal will be considered together with whatever additional written evidence can be submitted by the institution to strengthen its case for program approval. The appeal will be considered by the CED Board of Trustees at its annual meeting, and the institution may send a representative to that meeting.

e. However, during the time the appeal procedure is in effect, the following will apply:

(1) For institutions seeking approval for the first time, no decision will be made until the end of the formal appeal process.

(2) For institutions having a previously approved program which has been disapproved, the approved status will continue until the appeal process has been completed.

10. PROGRAM APPROVAL AND RE-APPROVALS

a. Approved and re-approved programs will be listed on the CED Approved Programs List and publicized in appropriate professional publications.

b. Program approval is granted for a period of five years. At the end of that period, if re-approval has not been requested and granted, program approval is terminated.

c. Initial program evaluation/approval and subsequent tenth-year evaluation/re-approvals follow the full set of procedures previously specified.

d. Fifth year (interim) program evaluation/re-approvals (i.e., those occurring during the 5th, 15th, 25th, etc., years after initial approval) may not require the full set of procedures be followed. However, these steps must be taken:

(1) At the beginning of the 5th year, the program will submit:

(a) A letter to the CED Program Evaluation Office, indicating its request for program re-approval.

(b) Payment of the Administrative Costs Fee.

(c) A complete Preliminary Report.

(d) An Interim Program Report, keyed to the previously submitted full Program Report, which addresses itself to all standards contained in the CED document and to all portions of the full Program Report and which states whether or not significant changes have occurred in any aspects of the program. All such changes must be identified and described in this Interim Report.

(2) Based upon the Interim Report, the Evaluation Panel recommends one of the following:

M Re-approval of the program

or

M Conditional re-approval pending response by the program to a request for clarification and additional informational and/or a request that the program meet certain conditions by a specified date

or

M Conditional re-approval pending the results of a site visit. This recommendation requires implementation of procedures for a full program evaluation.

ATTACHMENT I

Name of Institution: Program Director:

Checklist of Procedures for Program Evaluation

 

Date

Submitted

STEPS

Action

Taken

 

 

1. Official letter of request from applying institution.

 

 

 

 

2. Submission of preliminary data (Use Attachment II).

 

 

 

 

3. Program Evaluation Office review of preliminary data.

 

 

 

 

4. Official assumption of financial obligations for the evaluation.

 

 

 

 

5. Scheduling of site visit dates, and nomination of site visit team members.

 

 

 

 

6. Submission of full program report.

 

 

 

 

7. Selection of site visit team.

 

 

 

 

8. Site visit (see Attachment III).

 

 

 

 

9. Submission of site visit report to CED Program Evaluation Office.

 

 

 

 

10. Submission of site visit report to program director for clarification and/or response.

 

 

 

 

11. Distribution of data and reports to Evaluation Panel.

 

 

 

 

12. Evaluation Panel review of data and decision at regularly scheduled meeting.

 

 

 

 

13. Notification of decision by the Evaluation Panel.

 

 

 

 

14. Program responses to conditional approval or disapproval.

 

 

 

 

15. Listing of approved and reapproved programs.

 

 

 

 

16. Program approval and reevaluation requirements.

 

 

 

Council on Education of the Deaf

Program Evaluation Office

PRELIMINARY REPORT

Name of Institution: Date:

 

Administrative Units in Which Program is Located:

Name and Title of Unit Head:

1.

 

 

 

2.

 

 

 

3.

 

 

 

Program Director

 

Name

 

 

 

Title

 

 

 

Street

 

 

 

City,

State ,Zip

 

 

Phone

 

 

 

Provide the name of the current member of the regular college or university faculty who is responsible for the coordination of the teacher preparation program for teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing (may be same as "Program Director", above).

 

 

Name

 

 

 

Title

 

 

 

Street

 

 

 

City, State,

Zip

 

 

Phone

 

 

 

Academic

Rank

 

 

 

 

Degrees

Date

College or

University

Major

Area(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CED Professional Certificate ___

Other Professional Certification:

1. Year in which the program was established:

2. Fill in this section using the following headings:

(a) Degree granted upon completion of the program.

(b) Average length of program.

(c) Area(s) of specialization offered.

(d) Number of graduates for the previous three years.

(e) Number of current Full-Time (FT) and Part-Time (PT) students.

 

 

 

a

b

c

 

 

d

 

 

e

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

year

year

year

FT

PT

Under-graduate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. What principal mode(s) of communication or languages are taught students enrolled in the program?

Auditory/Oral Rochester Method Cued Speech

Simultaneous/Total Communication (Describe further, if desired)

American Sign Language

Other (Specify):

  1. Please enclose a college or university calendar.
  2. Use the space below or a separate page to provide a one-paragraph summary program description to be posted at the CED Web site.
  3. (Optional) Additional information.

ATTACHMENT III

RECOMMENDED PROGRAM REPORT FORMS

In the development of a complete Program Report, it is suggested that the following forms be used. The intent in this is to standardize the location and format of data and essential program information that will be needed by site visitors and the evaluation panel.

 

Forms Attached:

Form #1 - Practicum Centers and Personnel

Form #1.1 - Direct Supervisors of Practicum

Form #2 - Professional Personnel

Form #3 - Admission Procedures and Criteria

Form #4 - Schedule of Courses - Faculty

Form #5 - Report on Graduates

Form #6 - Program Specialization

Form #7 - Knowledge and Skill Statements for Curriculum Components

 

 

Form #1 - (Ref: CED Manual I, Standard 1.4.2)

PRACTICUM CENTERS AND PERSONNEL

(for observations, participation, student teaching, internships, recreational activities)

Please use a separate sheet for each practicum facility

Name of Facility

 

Distance from Campus Are any students housed near

miles minutes the facility? Yes No

Nature of the Facility

Day Class (state how many) Day School Itinerant Program Residential

Hospital/Clinic Private Day Private Residential Resource Rm.

Other (specify)

 

Number of Students placed at this facility during present school year

 

Primary type(s) of experience sought at this facility:

____ Observations ____ Student Teaching ____ Tutoring

____ Teacher Aide ____ Non-academic ____ Other (specify) _______

 

Which CED specializations does the facility match? (Please list.)

 

Which CED program philosophy does the program best represent?

Auditory-Oral Comprehensive Bilingual-Bicultural

 

II. PROFILE OF PRACTICUM FACILITY NO. OF CHILDREN SERVED

No. of Teachers ____ Birth to Age 3 ____

No. of Teachers Pre-primary ____

CED Certified ____ Elementary ____

State Certified ____ Secondary ____

No. of Supervisory

Personnel ____ Special Content ____

No. of Teachers/Supervisors

with Master's degree ____

 

Form #1.1 - (Ref: CED Manual I, Std. 1.4.2)

Please attach a vita for each person listed.

III. DIRECT SUPERVISORS OF PRACTICUM

Names of Cooperating or Supervising Personnel

Highest Degree

 

Area of

Certification

Years

Teaching or

Specializing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Form #2 - (Ref: CED Manual I, Std. 2)

PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL

Use one 2-page form and append a vita for each person involved in the program.

Name Title

 

Academic rank: Date of appointment:

 

Earned Degrees

Undergraduate:

Masters:

Doctorate:

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Type Location Dates Duties

Teaching Deaf Children

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Teaching Experiences

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative, Supervisory, or Other experiences

 

 

 

 

 

 

List courses, supervision and other typical responsibilities in the deaf and hard of hearing teacher preparation program.

Fall Spring Summer Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Form 2, Page 2

List at least five relevant publications (dissertations may be included).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

List memberships in professional organizations or professional service.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current research, writing, or other professional projects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Form #3 - (Ref: CED Manual I, Std. 3.0)

ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND CRITERIA

INSTITUTION:

Part I. Selection Procedures and Criteria: Check below all procedures and criteria to be employed in the selection of students in teacher preparation programs for the deaf and hard of hearing.

 

 

 

Junior

 

Senior

Master

Degree

Post Master

 

Summer

Required Grade Point Average (Specify) Overall

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous Credentials

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acceptance by Graduate Division of the Institution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Specified by the University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biographical Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letters of Recommendation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other (Specify)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART II: Briefly describe the selection process and relative weights assigned to the selection criteria.

FORM # 4 (Ref: CED - 2, Std. 2.0)

Schedule of Course Offerings and Faculty Responsibilities for the Past Two Years

(Use faculty members= initials in the first table and identify them in the second. Identify all courses by number and full title on an attached page. Use additional forms if needed.)

Course Numbers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SP

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SP

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SS

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Initials

Full Name and Title

% of Time in Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FORM # 5 (Ref: CED - 2, Std. 3.4)

Report on Graduates for Prior Two-Year Period

 

Year

 

No of Students Graduated

No of Students Certified

Number of Graduated Students Placed

in Each Setting

Education of the Deaf General

PSE PSS IT RRT MHC RSC PSC GE 1 2 3

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Legend:

PSE Public Self-contained Elementary

PSS Public Self-contained Secondary

IT Itinerant Teacher

RRT Resource Room Teacher

MHC Multiple Handicapped

RSC Residential School Class

PSC Private School Class

GE General Education

01 Other Employment

02 Unemployed

03 Continuing Education

FORM # 6 (Ref: CED - 2, Std. 1.3)

PROGRAM SPECIALIZATION INFORMATION

Please use a separate form for each area of specialization

Name of institution:

A. Area of Specialization: _____Early childhood _____Elementary

_____Secondary _____Multihandicapped

_____Special Content Area _____Other:_____________________

B. Number of specific courses and credit hours required for specialization:

 

C. Number of clock hours of student teaching required in this area of specialization:

 

D. What percentage of total clock hours of student teaching in the program does this represent?

 

E. List or attach required prerequisite courses for this area of specialization by course number, title, hours of credit, and assigned instructor:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

F. List or attach required courses in this specialization by course number, title, hours of credit, and assigned instructor. (Please place a course outline in the appendix of the report for each course listed.)

Directions: The following 173 statements are from the ACEC Common Core of Knowledge and Skills Essential for All Beginning Special Education Teachers,@ and the ACEC Knowledge and Skills for All Beginning Special Education Teachers of Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.@ The former have been adopted by CED, and the latter were jointly developed by CED and CEC and have been approved by all of the CED constituent organizations. Please note that the term special education is intended to include education of students who are deaf and hard of hearing, and exceptional learning needs are intended to include educational implications of deafness or hearing loss. Indicate how each statement is addressed in your program. Reference to a specific syllabus item, prerequisite, guideline, course or practicum requirement, or other specific citation will be sufficient.

 

CEC Common Core

Curriculum Areas

Location of Documentation (e.g., course number, objective, and/or session)

Philosophical, Historical, and Legal Foundations of Special Education

Knowledge

K1. Models, theories, and philosophies that provide the basis for special education practice.

 

 

K2. Variations in beliefs, traditions, and values across cultures within society and the effect of the relationship among child, family, and schooling.

 

 

K3. Issues in definition and identification procedures for individuals with exceptional learning needs including individuals from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds.

 

 

K4. Assurances and due process rights related to assessment, eligibility, and placement.

 

 

K5. Rights and responsibilities of parents, students, teachers and other professionals, and schools as the relate to individual learning needs.

 

 

Skills

S1. Articulate personal philosophy of special education including its relationship to/with regular education.

 

 

S2. Conduct instructional and other professional activities consistent with the requirements of law, rules and regulations, and local district policies and procedures.

 

 

Characteristics of Learners

Knowledge

K1. Similarities and differences among the cognitive, physical, cultural, social, and emotional needs of individuals with and without exceptional learning needs.

 

 

K2. Differential characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities, including levels of severity and multiple exceptionalities.

 

 

K3. Characteristics of normal, delayed, and disordered communication patterns of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

K4. Effects an exceptional conditions (s) may have on an individual=s life.

 

 

K5. Characteristics and effects of the cultural and environmental milieu of the child and the family including cultural and linguistic diversity, socioeconomic level, abuse/neglect, and substance abuse.

 

 

K6. Effects of various medications on the educational, cognitive, physical, social, and emotional behavior of individuals with exceptionalities.

 

 

K7. Educational implications of characteristics of various exceptionalities.

 

 

Skills

S1. Access information on various cognitive, communication, physical, cultural, social, and emotional conditions of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation

Knowledge

K1. Basic terminology used in assessment.

 

 

K2. Ethical concerns related to assessment.

 

 

K3. Legal provisions, regulations, and guidelines regarding assessment of individuals.

 

 

K4. Typical procedures used for screening, pre-referral, referral, and classification.

 

 

K5. Appropriate application and interpretation of scores, including grade score versus standard score, percentile ranks, age/grade equivalents, and stanines.

 

 

K6. Appropriate use and limitations of each type of assessment instrument.

 

 

K7. Incorporation of strategies that consider the influence of diversity on assessment, eligibility, programming, and placement of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

K8. The relationship between assessment and placement decisions.

 

 

K9. Methods for monitoring progress of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

Skills

S1. Collaborate with families and other professionals involved in the assessment of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

S2. Create and maintain records.

 

 

S3. Gather background information regarding academic, medical, and family history.

 

 

S4. Use various types of assessment procedures appropriately.

 

 

S5. Interpret information from formal and informal assessment instruments and procedures.

 

 

S6. Report assessment results to individuals with exceptional learning needs, parents, administrators, and other professionals using appropriate communication skills.

 

 

S7. Use performance data and information from teachers, other professionals, individuals with exceptionalities, and parents to make or suggest appropriate modification in learning environments.

 

 

S8. Develop individualized assessment strategies for instruction.

 

 

S9. Use assessment information in making instructional decisions and planning individual programs that result in appropriate placement and intervention for all individuals with exceptional learning needs, including those from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds.

 

 

S10. Evaluate the results of instruction.

 

 

S11. Evaluate supports needed for integration into various program placements.

 

 

Instructional Content and Practice

Knowledge

K1. Differing learning styles of individuals with exceptional learning needs and how to adapt teaching to these styles.

 

 

K2. Demands of various learning environments such as individualized instruction in general education classes.

 

 

K3. Curricula for the development of motor, cognitive, academic, social, language, affective, career, and functional life skills for individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

K4. Instructional and remedial methods, techniques, and curriculum materials.

 

 

K5. Techniques for modifying instructional methods and materials.

 

 

K6. Life skills instruction relevant to independent, community, and personal living and employment.

 

 

K7. Cultural perspectives influencing the relationship among families, schools, and communities as related to effective instruction for individuals with exceptional learning needs,

 

 

Skills

S1. Interpret and use assessment data for instruction.

 

 

S2. Develop and/or select instructional content, materials, resources, and strategies that respond to cultural, linguistic, and gender differences.

 

 

S3. Develop comprehensive, longitudinal individualized programs.

 

 

S4. Choose and use appropriate technologies to accomplish instructional objectives and to integrate them appropriately into the instructional process.

 

 

S5. Prepare appropriate lesson plans.

 

 

S6. Involve the individual and family in setting instructional goals and charting progress.

 

 

S7. Use task analysis.

 

 

S8. Select, adapt, and use instructional strategies and materials according to characteristics of the learner.

 

 

S9. Sequence, implement, and evaluate individual learning objectives.

 

 

S10. Integrate affective, social, and career/vocational skills with academic curricula.

 

 

S11. Use strategies for facilitating maintenance and generalization of skills across learning environments.

 

 

S12. Use instructional time properly.

 

 

S13. Teach individuals with exceptional learning needs to use thinking, problem-solving, and other cognitive strategies to meed their individual needs.

 

 

S14. Choose and implement instructional techniques and strategies that promote successful transitions for individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

S15. Establish and maintain rapport with learners.

 

 

S16. Use verbal and nonverbal communication techniques.

 

 

S17. Conduct self-evaluation of instruction.

 

 

Planning and Managing the Teaching and Learning Environment

Knowledge

K1. Basic classroom management theories, methods, and techniques for individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

K2. Research-based best practices for effective management of teaching and learning.

 

 

K3. Ways in which technology can assist with planning and managing the teaching and learning environment.

 

 

Skills

S1. Create a safe, positive, and supportive learning environment in which diversities are valued.

 

 

S2. Use strategies and techniques for facilitating the functional integration of individuals with exceptional learning needs in various settings.

 

 

S3. Prepare and organize materials to implement daily lesson plans.

 

 

S4. Incorporate evaluation, planning, and management procedures that match learner needs with the instructional environment.

 

 

S5. Design a learning environment that encourages active participation by learners in a variety of individual and group learning activities.

 

 

S6. Design, structure, and manage daily routines, effectively including transition time, for students, other staff, and the instructional setting.

 

 

S7. Direct the activities of a classroom paraprofessional, aide, volunteer, or peer tutor.

 

 

S8. Create an environment that encourages self-advocacy and increased independence.

 

 

Managing Student Behavior and Social Interaction Skills

Knowledge

K1. Applicable laws, rules and regulations, and procedural safeguards regarding the planning and implementation of management of behaviors of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

K2. Ethical considerations inherent in behavior management.

 

 

K3. Teacher attitudes and behaviors that positively or negatively influence behavior of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

K4. Social skills needed for educational and functional living environments and effective instruction in the development of social skills.

 

 

K5. Strategies for crisis prevention/intervention.

 

 

K6. Strategies for preparing individuals to live harmoniously and productively n a multi-class, multiethnic, multicultural, and multi-national world.

 

 

Skills

S1. Demonstrate a variety of effective behavior management techniques appropriate to the needs of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

S2. Implement the least intensive intervention consistent with the needs of the individuals with exceptionalities.

 

 

S3. Modify the learning environment (schedule and physical arrangement) to manage inappropriate behaviors.

 

 

S4. Identify realistic expectations for personal and social behavior in various settings.

 

 

S5. Integrate social skills into the curriculum

 

 

S6. Use effective teaching procedures in social skills instruction.

 

 

S7. Demonstrate procedures to increase the individual=s self=awareness, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem.

 

 

S8. Prepare individuals with exceptional learning needs to exhibit self-enhancing behavior in response to societal attitudes and actions.

 

 

Communication and Collaborative Partnerships

Knowledge

K1. Factors that promote effective communication and collaboration with individuals, parents, and school and community personnel in a culturally responsive program.

 

 

K2. Typical concerns of parents of individuals with exceptional learning needs and appropriate strategies to help parents deal with these concerns.

 

 

K3. Development of individual student programs working in collaboration with team members.

 

 

K4. Roles of individuals with exceptionalities, parents, teachers, and other school and community personnel in planning an individualized program.

 

 

K5. Ethical practices for confidential communication to others about individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

Skills

S1. Use collaborative strategies in working with individuals with exceptional learning needs, parents, and school and community personnel in various learning environments.

 

 

S2. Communicate and consult with individuals, parents, teachers, and other school and community personnel.

 

 

S3. Foster respectful and beneficial relationships between families and professionals.

 

 

S4. Encourage and assist families to become active participants in the educational team.

 

 

S5. Plan and conduct collaborative conferences with families or primary caregivers.

 

 

S6. Collaborate with regular classroom teachers and other school and community personnel in integrating individuals with exceptional learning needs into various learning environments.

 

 

S7. Communicate with regular teachers, administrators, and other school personnel about characteristics and needs of individuals with specific exceptional learning needs.

 

 

Professionalism and Ethical Practices

Knowledge

K1. Personal cultural biases and differences that affect one=s teaching.

 

 

K2. Importance of the teacher serving as a model for individuals iwth exceptional learning needs.

 

 

Skills

S1. Demonstrate commitment to developing the highest educational and quality-of-life potential of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

 

 

S2. Demonstrate positive regard for the culture, religion, gender, and sexual orientation of individual students.

 

 

S3. Promote and maintain a high level of competence and integrity in the practice of the profession.

 

 

S4. Exercise objective professional judgment in the practice of the profession.

 

 

S5. Demonstrate proficiency in oral and written communication.

 

 

S6. Engage in professional activities that may benefit individuals with exceptional learning needs, their families, and/or colleagues.

 

 

S7. Comply with local, state, provincial, and federal monitoring and evaluation requirements.

 

 

S8. Use copyrighted educational materials in an ethical manner.

 

 

S9. Practice within the CEC Code of Ethics and other standards and policies of the profession.

 

 

 

 

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Curriculum Areas

Location of Documentation (e.g., course number, objective, and/or session)

I. Philosophical, Historical, and Legal Foundations of Deaf Education

Knowledge

1. Current educational definitions of students with hearing loss, including identification criteria, labeling issues, and current incidence and prevalence figures.

 

 

2. Models, theories, and philosophies (e.g., bilingual-bicultural, total communication, oral/aural) that provide the basis for educational practice(s) for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, as consistent with program philosophy.

 

 

3. Variations in beliefs, traditions, and values across cultures and within society, and the effect of the relationships among children who are deaf or hard of hearing, their families, and schooling.

 

 

4. Issues in definition and identification procedures for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing (e.g., cultural versus medical perspective).

 

 

5. Rights and responsibilities (e.g., Deaf Children's Bill of Rights) of parents, students, teachers, and schools as they relate to students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

6. The impact of various educational placement options (from the perspective of the needs of any given child who is deaf or hard of hearing and consistent with program philosophy) with regard to cultural identity and linguistic, academic, and social-emotional development.

 

 

Skills

7. Apply understanding of theory, philosophy and models of practice to the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

8. Articulate pros and cons of current issues and trends in special education and the field of education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

9. Identify the major contributors to the growth and improvement of knowledge and practice in the field of education of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

II. Characteristics of Learners

Knowledge

10. Communication features (visual, spatial, tactile, and/or auditory) salient to the learner who is deaf or hard of hearing that are necessary to enhance cognitive, emotional, and social development.

 

 

11. Research in cognition related to children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

12. Cultural dimensions that being deaf or hard of hearing may add to the life of a child.

 

 

13. Various etiologies of hearing loss that can result in additional sensory, motor, and/or learning differences in students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

14. Effects of families and/or primary caregivers on the overall development of the child who is deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

15. Effects that onset of hearing loss, age of identification, and provision of services have on the development of the child who is deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

16. Impact of early comprehensible communication on the development of the child who is deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

17. Recognition that being deaf or hard of hearing alone does not necessarily preclude normal academic development, cognitive development, or communication ability.

 

 

18. The differences in quality and quantity of incidental language/learning experiences that children who are deaf or hard of hearing may experience.

 

 

19. Effects of sensory input on the development of language and cognition of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

III. Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation

Knowledge

20. Specialized terminology used in the assessment of children who are deaf or hard of hearing

 

 

21. Components of an adequate evaluation for eligibility placement and program planning (e.g., interpreters, special tests) decisions for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

22. Legal provisions, regulations and guidelines regarding unbiased diagnostic assessment, and use of instructional assessment measures with students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

23. Special policies regarding referral and placement procedures (e.g., Federal Policy Guidance, October 30, 1993) for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

Skills

24. Administer appropriate assessment tools utilizing the natural/native/preferred language of the student who is deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

25. Gather and analyze communication samples from students who are deaf or hard of hearing, including nonverbal as well as linguistic acts.

 

 

26. Use exceptionality-specific assessment instruments (e.g., SAT-HI, TERA-DHH, FSST) appropriate for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

IV. Instructional Content and Practice

Knowledge

27. Sources of specialized materials for students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

28. Components of the nonlinguistic and linguistic communication that students who are deaf or hard of hearing use.

 

 

29. The procedures and technologies required to educate students who are deaf or hard of hearing under one or more of the existing modes or philosophies (consistent with program philosophy).

 

 

30. Information related to American Sign Language (ASL) and existing communication modes used by students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

31. Current theories of how languages (e.g., ASL and English) develop in both children who are hearing and those who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

32. Subject matter and practices used in general education across content areas.

 

 

33. Ways to facilitate cognitive and communicative development in students who are deaf or hard of hearing (e.g., visual saliency) consistent with program philosophy.

 

 

34. Techniques of stimulation and utilization of residual hearing in students who are deaf or hard of hearing consistent with program philosophy.

 

 

35. Research-supported instructional strategies and practice for teaching students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

Skills

36. Demonstrate proficiency in the language(s) the beginning teacher will use to instruct students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

37. Demonstrate the basic characteristics of various existing communication modes used with students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

38. Select, design, produce, and utilize media, materials, and resources required to educate students who are deaf or hard of hearing under one or more of the existing modes or philosophies (e.g., bilingual-bicultural, total communication, oral/aural).

 

 

39. Infuse speech skills into academic areas as consistent with the mode or philosophy espoused and the ability of the student who is deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

40. Modify the instructional process and classroom environment to meet the physical, cognitive, cultural, and communicative needs of the child who is deaf or hard of hearing (e.g., teacher's style, acoustic environment, availability of support services, availability of appropriate technologies).

 

 

41. Facilitate independent communication behavior in children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

42. Apply first and second language teaching strategies (e.g., English through ASL or ESL) appropriate to the needs of the individual student who is deaf or hard of hearing and consistent with program philosophy.

 

 

43. Demonstrate the ability to modify incidental language experiences to fit the visual and other sensory needs of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

44. Provide appropriate activities for students who are deaf or hard of hearing to promote literacy in English and/or ASL.

 

 

V. Planning and Managing the Teaching and Learning Environment

Knowledge

45. Deaf cultural factors that may influence classroom management of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

46. Model programs, including career/vocational and transition, that have been effective for students with hearing losses.

 

 

Skills

 

 

47. Manage assistive/augmentative devices appropriate for students who are deaf or hard of hearing in learning environments.

 

 

48. Select, adapt, and implement classroom management strategies for students who are deaf or hard of hearing that reflect understanding of each child's cultural needs, including primarily visual Deaf culture where appropriate.

 

 

49. Design a classroom environment that maximizes opportunities for visually oriented and/or auditory learning in students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

50. Plan and implement instruction for students who are deaf or hard of hearing and who have multiple disabilities and special needs.

 

 

VI. Managing Student Behavior and Social Interaction Skills

Knowledge

51. Processes for establishing ongoing interactions of students who are deaf or hard of hearing with peers and role models who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

52. Opportunities for interaction with communities of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing on the local, state, and national levels.

 

 

Skills

53. Prepare students who are deaf or hard of hearing in the appropriate use of interpreters.

 

 

VII. Communication and Collaborative Partnerships

Knowledge

54. Available resources to help parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing deal with their concerns regarding educational options and communication modes/philosophies for their children.

 

 

55. Roles and responsibilities of teachers and support personnel in educational practice for students who are deaf or hard of hearing (e.g., educational interpreters, tutors and note-takers).

 

 

56. Effects of communication on the development of family relationships and strategies used to facilitate communication in families with children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

57. Services provided by governmental and non-governmental agencies or individuals in the ongoing management of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

Skills

58. Teach students who are deaf or hard of hearing to use support personnel effectively (e.g., educational interpreters, tutors, and note-takers).

 

 

59. Facilitate communication between the child who is deaf or hard of hearing and his or her family and/or other caregivers.

 

 

60. Facilitate coordination of support personnel (e.g., interpreters) to meet the diverse communication needs of the student who is deaf or hard of hearing and his or her primary caregivers.

 

 

VII. Professionalism and Ethical Practice

Knowledge

61. The process for acquiring the needed skills in modes/philosophies of education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing in which an individual was not prepared.

 

 

62. Consumer and professional organizations, publications, and journals relevant to the field of education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

Skills

63. Actively seek interaction with adults in the Deaf community to maintain/improve ASL, English signs, or cues as consistent with program philosophy.

 

 

64. Demonstrate the ability to interact with a variety of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing on an adult-to-adult level.

 

 

65. Provide families with the knowledge and skills to make appropriate choices needed to enhance the development and transition of their children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

 

 

66. Participate in the activities of professional organizations relevant to the education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.