Shared Reading Steps for

Kindergarten and First Grade

October 27, 1998

by Pat Love

  1. Develop background knowledge of the selected book in A.S.L.
  1. Key points to illustrate:
    1. Front of the book;
    2. Back of the book;
    3. Author;
    4. Illustrator; and
    5. Pictures within the book.
  1. Read the big book or transparency.
  1. Teacher uses an easel or stand to hold the big book and/or transparencies of the book.
  2. Explain the main idea on each page in A.S.L.
  3. Next, point to the words and read to the students in English.
  4. Students are encouraged to join the reading in English.
  1. The teacher rereads the same story in English.
  1. Students individually lead the reading in English and point to the words.
  2. Each student takes a turn.
  1. The teacher and students rereads the story in English with discussion in A.S.L. The instructs with the use a "flag" or "slide" window to review key words. (Invitations by Reggie Routman PG 96b and 97b). The student then follows the teacher’s model.
  2. Reread the story again.
  1. Students share playing the teacher role again by pointing to the words. The class follows and reads along.
  2. Students predict the repeated pattern throughout the story.
  1. Role-play the story in A.S.L.
  2. Teacher creates a big book for the students to complete illustrating the main concept(s) and word(s) in the story using A.S.L.
  1. Use the picture and signed word to label the key words.
  2. Have the student write the key words beside the picture. When the student can match the picture to the word, the sign is no longer needed to be incorporated in the process.
  1. Author’s Chair:
  1. The student shares his/her writings in the author’s chair.
  2. The teacher interprets student’s use of the acquired language of their choice.
  1. The following skills and activities should be used throughout the reading process. One of these activities should be used at the conclusion of a rereading of the story to focus on print. Select the key word(s) from the story and have the student do one or more of the following:
  1. Have the student say in English and sign the letter that is emphasized in the student-made book.
  2. Make a simple alphabet book emphasizing or repeating the letter sound of the initial consonant while decorating the inside of the letter traced by the student;
  3. The student sounds out the letters while pushing magnetic letters into alconen boxes ( ). This is first modeled on the overhead by the teacher;
  4. Have the student select the initial or final consonant letters from a selected few known alphabet letters from the overhead.
  5. The student practices the letter sound by using various tactile modes: sandpaper; chalk; water etc.
  6. Read a short alphabet book illustrating the emphasized initial letter and comparing it to other words or objects with the same initial letter.
  7. Capital and lower case letters and punctuation, should be emphasized throughout the lesson.

 

Shared Reading Steps for

Grades Two through Four

October 27, 1998

by Pat Love

  1. Develop background knowledge of the selected book in A.S.L.
    1. Key points to illustrate:
    1. Front of the book;
    2. Back of the book;
    3. Author;
    4. Illustrator; and
    5. Pictures within the book.
  1. Read the book.
    1. Teacher uses an easel or stand to hold the big book and/or transparencies of the book.
    2. Explain the main idea on the page in A.S.L.
    3. Point to the words and read to the students in English.
    4. Students are encouraged to join the reading in English.
  1. The teacher rereads the same story in English.
    1. Students individually lead the reading in English and point to the words.
    2. Each student takes a turn.
  1. Use a "cloze" activity for vocabulary building.
    1. List vocabulary words on a word chart.
    2. Use sentence strips for vocabulary drill. The sentences are taken from the story have the vocabulary word letters omitted, but the letters are underlined to assist the student in selecting the correct word in context with the remaining sentence words.
    3. After the story has ended, write the vocabulary words on alphabet charts displayed on the wall for future referral.

 

  1. Make a retelling chart on large paper listing:
    1. The "Title" of the book;
    2. The author;
    3. The characters of the book (who);
    4. The setting (where); and
    5. The plot (what happened).
  1. Record the exact student’s responses on the chart with the student’s initials beside their responses. The teacher rewrites the student’s responses in good grammatical English sentences below or beside the students response.

        7. Have the students role-play the story in A.S.L.

    1. Daily reread the retelling chart and record any new
    2. responses of the students.

    3. Using pictures or sentences, sequence the story on
    4. the board and/or in a book fashion. The students will dictate sentences for each picture. The teacher will then copy the student’s sentences onto sentence strips. These sentences will be matched to the picture and read by the students in the proper sequence. The final goal is to omit the pictures and have the student sequence only the written sentences.

    5. Have the students keep a journal of the story. The student writes or teacher records the student’s dictated responses.
    6. The student shares his/her writing individually in the "Author’s" chair. The teacher interprets the student’s use of the acquired language of their choice.
    7. Make extension activities/projects to the story.

     

    Shared Reading Steps for

    Intermediate Grade Levels

    October 27, 1998

    by Pat Love

    1. Access student’s background knowledge on the topic.
    1. What do you know about the title of the book?
    2. What do you think the story will be about?
    3. Story impressions.
    4. K-W-L
    1. Use a transparency of a few paragraphs from the story.
    1. The students read the story together as the teacher points to the words.
    2. The teacher explains the passage in A.S.L.
    1. The students read assigned pages silently. This is done for each chapter of the book.
    2. The teacher displays a retelling chart.
      1. The students list the following: Title of the book; characters, plot, and setting.
      2. Vocabulary is developed from the retelling chart.
    1. The students read their retelling chart together. Any changes are made at this time.

    6. Do "cloze" activity.

    1. The students reread retelling chart. They will answer short- answer comprehension questions from the retelling chart and questions form the chapter. This is done at the end of each chapter.
    2. Continue the above steps for each new chapter.

    The basis of Shared Reading at the Intermediate level is the rereading of the retelling that is a written avenue of retelling the book. Reading strategies are incorporated throughout the process.

    Shared Reading

    October 27, 1998

    Pat Love

    Shared reading is: Any reading situation in which a learner or groups of learners sees the text, observes the "expert reader", usually the teacher, reading with fluency and expression, and invites all students to read along. The students have many opportunities to read and reread the story. (Invitations by Reggie Routman)

    The purpose of Shared Reading is:

    • To build reading comprehension.
    • Build background experiences of the student in A.S.L.
    • To use A.S.L. to construct meaning so that the students are attracted to the printed word.
    • To create a fun and enjoyable classroom environment in which all students can learn.
    • To allow students to become active participants.
    • To build reading skills and vocabulary skills within the context of the story.
    • To connect reading with writing.
    • To follow the Trumbull County Curriculum.
    • To follow the regular classroom teacher’s curriculum.
    • To use English to construct word relationship to print.
    • To allow the teacher to use a variety of reading strategies.
    • To give the teacher many opportunities to work with each student individually.

    Shared Reading

    For the Deaf

    Presented by Pat Love

    October 27, 1998

    Kent State University

    Speech Pathology and Audiology Department

    October 15, 1998

    Dear Staff Members:

    The following new speech pathology

    schedule will begin, Monday, October

    19th! Hope this will be easy to follow and

    easy for you to implement!

    Your cooperation has been appreciated!

    Sincerely,

    Pat Love

Pat Love
deafspeech@aol.com

 

Uploaded By: Stacy Moors/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major