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Amplification and Teaching Style

Key words: Information, Technologies for Deaf/HH

Document 1 of 6

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  • Subject: amplification and teaching style
  • From: Michael Pelc MPelc@AOL.COM
  • Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 09:32:04 -0400
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • I'm hoping the subscribers can help me out in gathering some information about current practices in educating deaf kids.

    In your educational setting, what (if anything) is the program policy with regard to amplification? Are auditory trainers (FM systems) required, optional or not used at all? What about hearing aids ... are they required, optional or not used? (if your program's policy is "optional," does that mean that the student decides, or does it mean that the teacher or an audiologist makes the decision?). I'd also be interested to know how you personally feel about policies regarding the use of amplification by your students (or your child, if a parent).

    Does your teaching style (for lack of a better word) usually consist of standing in front of the whole class and "lecturing" (again, not the best of words, but I think you get the concept ... the teacher presents the material to all the students as a group, the students are by-and-large passive receivers of the information presented by the teacher)? Or is instruction usually more interactive, with a lot of one-to-one or small group learning? (I would guess that most teachers use both of these "styles" ... I'm interested to know which one you use more often)

    Thanks for any info you can pass along

    Document 2 of 6

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  • Subject: Re: amplification and teaching style
  • From: Cathy Brandt CBRAN00@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Date: Sat, 29 Apr 1995 09:43:04 EDT
  • In-Reply-To: Message of Sat, 29 Apr 1995 09:32:04 -0400 from <MPelc@AOL.COM>
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Here it is INDIVIDUAL decisions made based on EACH CHILD'S needs. This is made at the time of the IEP and is documented. I have children who do use them and children who do not.

    8:45 - 9:00 Entire class Sits Together And Reads. STAR time is a school wide activity.

    9:00 - 10:00 One on One or One on Two work, Speech for some, Mainstream Math for others. So, *I* am doing individual work

    10 - 11 More of the same with different children. Others go out to math with the intepreter while I work individually with others.

    11 - 12 Group Language - Much is directed by the student who has written the daily language on the board. Some "lecturing" by me but never more than 3 - 5 minutes without student participation.

    12 Lunch

    Here the schedule is different daily based on what special class we have. So, recess and a special class goes here.

    1:30 Group computer time. Each child has own computer some days. Other days they are paired for the assignment.

    2:00 Group Unit Time - Some Lecture same as morning time. This is often an Activity Work time OR a Group Discussion time.

    Does that help, Michael?

    Cathy

    Document 3 of 6

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  • Subject: Re: amplification and teaching style
  • From: nina jacobs hbedu077@HUEY.CSUN.EDU
  • Date: Sun, 30 Apr 1995 15:14:04 +0800
  • In-Reply-To: <199504291504.IAA23138@huey.csun.edu>
  • Reply-To: nina jacobs hbedu077@huey.csun.edu
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • I'm a teacher in the LAUSD area (Los Angeles) and it's a "TC" program. Many of us are starting to subscribe and implement the Bi Bi methods. I might add not to the approval of our policies. All our students wear their FM systems. I've seen one teacher who places her/his mic on the radio and plays soothing music all day. So, even if they are wearing the trainers, if we don't voice they don't get input...a new kinda necklace.

    > What about hearing aids ... are they required, optional or not used? (if your program's policy is "optional," does that mean that the student decides, or does it mean that the teacher or an audiologist makes the decision?).

    The hearing aids are worn to and from school. We don't wear the trainers on field trips so the HA's are worn at that time also. We work very diligently on obtaining hearing aids for our children through CCS. Our parents in our neighborhood do not take good care of them though.

    > Does your teaching style (for lack of a better word) usually consist of standing in front of the whole class and "lecturing" (again, not the best of words, but I think you get the concept ... the teacher presents the material to all the students as a group, the students are by-and-large passive receivers of the information presented by the teacher)? Or is instruction usually more interactive, with a lot of one-to-one or small group learning?

    Most of the time we have activities pertaining to a theme, but I discard our day's lesson plan for something that happened the day before or on the bus ride and etc....I seize the day. I try to work through literature too.

    I should also let you know I teach PK.

    Hope this has helped!

    Nina

    Document 4 of 6

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  • Subject: Amplification and teaching styles
  • From: Lezlie Steffen LADYLLS@AOL.COM
  • Date: Sun, 30 Apr 1995 21:18:24 -0400
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • At our school it really depends on the classroom....

    In my own classroom the teacher, parent, audiologist and student make the decision. We are in a pilot bi-bi program and most of the children are profoundly deaf. The parents who want their child to wear hearing aids have all agreed we are to put the hearing aids on in the morning and during group speech time. If the child doesn't want the hearing aid we say ok and put it back in their cubby.... There are several students who wear them only when watching videotapes and when they are using the speech computer in speech time. Other students wear them about an hour before wanting to put them away. In one case the parent has asked to offer them throughout the day. The audiologist, of course, would like to see the students wear them more often, but has agreed that they wouldn't want the children to have bad experiences with the hearing aids by "forcing" them to wear them. I team teach preschool. We operate in a center based teaching program where students decide where they want to work. The only time a teacher "lectures" is story time and recall time at the end of centers.

    Hope this is the info you wanted,

    Lezlie Steffen

    Document 5 of 6

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  • Subject: Reply to: Amplification & Teaching style
  • From: "LUCKER, JAY" LUCKERJ@SJUMUSIC.BITNET
  • Date: Tue, 2 May 1995 02:32:37 EDT
  • In-Reply-To: In reply to your message of SUN 30 APR 1995 12:18:24 EDT
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Here's another opinion re: Hearing Aids, FMs, teaching style.

    The decision to use hearing aids and FM units here is usually a group decision made by the parents in consultation with the audiologist, and the members of the CSE (Committee on Special Ed.). The use of hearing aids is usually a decision soley of the parents in consultation with the audiologist if the child is young. But, once the child reaches adolescence, the child's input is very important, and, the child may decide no longer to use hearing aids.

    The use of FMs is typically encouraged in children, especially young children, but the determination to use an FM is up to the CSE to support the decision and place use of the FM in the IEP. Usually, if the CSE is not in favor of using an FM, the parents must advocate for their child. This seems more common in children who are mainstreamed/ inclusion where the local school not familiar with children who are deaf and HoH are resistant to spend the money for the FM system. I have had to work as an advocate with the parents to get FMs for many kids this way.

    As for teaching styles, it is unfortunate that teachers teach in their own style, and forget to teach to the learning styles of their children. As I have stated before, children even if they are deaf and HoH may be auditory, visual or kinesthetic learners. Unfortunately, most teachers are not aware of learning styles and of how to teach in a multimodal learning fashion to reach the different learning styles of all of the children in the class.

    Hope this is helpful

    Dr. J! @ St. John's
    <luckerj@sjumusic.stjohns.edu>

    Document 6 of 6

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  • Subject: Re: amplification and teaching style
  • From: "Karen M. Wing 407-784-0284" WINGK@MAIL.FIRN.EDU
  • Date: Fri, 5 May 1995 16:03:00 EST
  • Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education EDUDEAF@UKCC.UKY.EDU
  • My name is Karen Wing and I teach Deaf and HoH students in Cape Canaveral, FL. Our school is located very near the ocean and near the shuttle launch site. When the shuttle goes off, we make it a whole school affair and all go out onto the blacktop to "hear/feel" the roar and the vibrations, and to cheer the success of the launch.

    You wanted some information about the use of FM systems and personal hearing aids. You also requested info on which teaching style I use.

    All of the students are fitted with FM systems based on the recommendation of the Audiologist who works for the school system. Each child is strongly encouraged to wear personal hearing aids for use outside the classroom. I teach a group ranging from first through sixth grade. I have six children presently with one full time assistant who is profoundly deaf. My assistant works under my guidance mainly to provide drill and practice, computer assistance, and to keep the rest of the kids "under control" while I work with an individual or small group.

    The only time that I work with the group as a whole is for science and I try to keep things very "hands-on" with the older kids helping the younger ones. I have one that is mainstreamed almost all day with an interpreter, and another student that we have just started to mainstream for language arts and math.

    I hope that this provides you the information that you need. Feel free to contact me if you need clarification for further information.

    Karen Wing
    Cape View Elementary
    Cape Canaveral, FL
    wingk@mail.firn.edu

    Uploaded by: Melissa Close/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major