Daycare Rights for Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing Children

 

Document 1 of 10

Document: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

From: Michael R Brummer <mbrummer@JUNO.COM>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU

Why in the first place do you send a deaf child to a daycare that has
children who can hear and will not understand that this new kid is deaf
and if they wanted his/her attention and thinks that the new kid is
ignoring them, they may end up bullying the new kid. If its luck that
the kid at the daycare who has parents who are deaf and that kid knows
sign language then there is not a problem for the new deaf kid. Need to
realize that socialization is important for all deaf kids as well for any
kids, when deaf kids develop good social skills, they can succeed in the
"real world" as adults socializing around deaf and hearing people. So
the question is that will the new kid be able to communicate or social
well in a daycare without understanding or sign language be good for the
deaf kid? Bad experience tend to develop inappropriate social skills in
any children.

Mike Brummer
mbrummer@juno.com
I hear and I forget.
I see and I remember.
I do and I understand.
--Chinese Proverb---
___________________________________________________________________

Document 2 of 10

1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

From: "Bagby, Mary M." <mbagby@EROLS.COM>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
Also just "for the sake of a friendly discussion," why don't we provide group living quarters, with Deaf foster parents, to socialize children from remote areas when appropriate local care is unavailable? In many states there are empty buildings on lovely grounds that were once called "Schools for the Deaf" that we might be able to rent for our daycare program.

Document 3 of 10

1 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

 

-----Original Message-----
From: No Name Available <MOLLYBLACK@AOL.COM>
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU <EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU>
Date: Sunday, March 07, 1999 5:04 PM
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
In a message dated 3/7/1999 9:38:09 AM US Mountain Standard Time,
mbrummer@JUNO.COM writes:
Why in the first place do you send a deaf child to a daycare that has
children who can hear and will not understand that this new kid is deaf
and if they wanted his/her attention and thinks that the new kid is
ignoring them, they may end up bullying the new kid. >>
For the sake of a friendly discussion, let us say that the parents have no
other choice due to circumstances beyond their control. Living in a remote
location and have to work are the main factors. Wise and compassionate child
caretakers could make the experience a positive one for all the children.
Granted that it is not an ideal situation but neither is "Home Alone."
Judy Warden

Document 4 of 10

1 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10

From: No Name Available <MOLLYBLACK@AOL.COM>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
That is an idea worth considering but if parents don't want to send very young
children away from home, maybe another option would be to see if deaf adults
or senior citizens live in the area. I agree that Deaf children need to be
expose to ASL at the earliest possible time. It is also important that we as
educators try to work with parents.
Judy Warden

Document 5 of 10

1 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10

From: Jeanne Shaw <jshaw@NETIDEA.COM>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
That is an idea worth considering but if parents don't want to send very young
;children away from home, maybe another option would be to see if deaf adults
;or senior citizens live in the area. I agree that Deaf children need to be
expose to ASL at the earliest possible time. It is also important that we as
;educators try to work with parents.
And that is great too, however there are places where there are no Deaf
adults and no ASL. The closest Deaf adult to me is about 350 miles away to
the west or east, farther to the north; a little closer to the south but we
would have to cross an international border. Sometimes it's just not
possible. AND you can let parents know about workshops, camps, etc in
other areas that they can attend AND you can help them find finding;
sometimes they just can't make that kind of trip. Not every child can have
the ideal--although I know it would be great!
Jeanne Shaw

Document 6 of 10

1 2 3 4 5 7 8 9 10

From: Candy Krepel <ckrepel@POST.ITS.MCW.EDU>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
On Sun, 7 Mar 1999, Michael R Brummer wrote:
; Why in the first place do you send a deaf child to a daycare that has
; children who can hear and will not understand that this new kid is deaf
; and if they wanted his/her attention and thinks that the new kid is
ignoring them, they may end up bullying the new kid.
Why? Because the parents work during the day and need daycare. Daycare
centers for deaf kids do not exist. Parents have to make the best of what
they can find.
Candy Krepel (been there, done that, worried, educated, changed settings,
worried some more)

Document 7 of 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10

From: Dana Steinhauer <hnetdes@ttuhsc.edu>
Organization: TTUHSC HealthNet
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
The ideal situation does not exist. Now that my child is three she goes to
the preschool class. I still have to work with after school care and Summer
Day care. I normally pay twice the going rate for day care to provide
communication for her. There are no day cares in the area that provide
caretakers that know ASL. Private daycare is scary and undependalble.
There are no easy answers.
Dana

Document 8 of 10>

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 10

From: Michael R Brummer <mbrummer@JUNO.COM>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
On Mon, 8 Mar 1999 09:39:42 -0600 Candy Krepel <ckrepel@POST.ITS.MCW.EDU>
writes:
Candy Krepel wrote:
Why? Because the parents work during the day and need daycare.
Daycare centers for deaf kids do not exist. Parents have to make the best of
what they can find.
This is just my opinion, your right. If parents have no choice but need
a daycare or babysitter or a nanny. But the parents will have to keep in
mind that any children with disabilities are easily abused especially
those who cannot communicate with adults who don't know sign language. I
am sure that there are caregivers who REALLY loves children and are
excellent caregiver. It is just a caution, I am more concerned that the
caregiver is aware of what is happening with the deaf children as you
know they can be really quiet that the caregiver forgets that they are
there in the room. Or they can be loud but didn't realized it and will
receive too much attention that can be negative experience. There is no
right answer, but I am sure and hope that the parents of deaf children
will do research for a daycare that is willing to learn sign language or
be aware of their needs.
Mike B

Document 9 of 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10

From: "Jean S. Wright" <jswright@CLOVER.NET>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
Hi, all!
I am so glad this question finally took off and got some responses. As
you might recall, I was the original poster regarding the question of
available recourse for a deaf child in need of daycare, whose providers are
suddenly balking at the idea of providing needed services.
I have been pleased to see the dialog, and the give and take. My major
question, though, was whether or not there was legal recourse for a family
whose child was possibly being 'expelled' from a federally funded daycare on
the basis of the cost inherent in a disability. The daycare was aware of
the child's needs prior to enrollment, advertises itself as an accessible
placement for special needs children, and still feels it is ok to charge
more, and insist on shorter hours of placement for the child because they
are a 'business'.
There is not much else available where we live. The daycare the child
used last year closed in June 98, and this daycare picked up many of the
clients from both that and another daycare that has closed abruptly. My
research seems to indicate that the applicable law would be 'Section 504'
which states that a person with a significant disability (this child has
multiple difficulties) cannot be excluded from full participation in a
federally funded program. Appropriate modifications of the program must be
made. This 'additional fee' would seem to me to be an exclusion, as would
an insistence on a cut-back of hours. Any thoughts, especially on the legal
angles?
Jean Wright
jswright@clover.net

Document 10 of 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

From: mary <memapads@4paragon.net>
Subject: Re: daycare rights?
To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU
I have a daycare horror story. When my daughter Hayley was 4 and her
sister about 2 I placed her with a day care provider whose grandmother was
deaf and who was willing to learn sign. She came recommended and when I
got there she had out sign books and took classes at the local jc. Well
within a few months she was supposedly signing quite well but did not
understand that my daughter had no clue when she said Go get your shoes and
put them on in sign, since there was a langauge delay and a sequential
processing problem. Time went on, and I stayed out of a sense of
obligation that she was taking sign classes. My other daughter Elizabeth
mentioned spanking for peeing in the pants. There is SOOO much more but
.... finally we left. There were too many clues and I was wrong to have
stayed. A few weeks later I was contacted by the day care authorities (the
state). The provider was being investigated for spanking (2 little boys I
had seen there, only stayed one week). I did not make the complaint but
had it gone to court, I would have been a star witness since I corroborated
and had my own stories to tell. Unfortunately my 2.5 year old at the time
did not make a credible witness and Hayley did not have the words yet to
say, This person spanked me. I know in my heart the provider DID spank
Hayley and I have that to live with.
The moral of this is just because someone wants to learn or is learning
sign, that you may not want to go with that person based on just that.
Consider the entirety of the provider. You may find a more loving
environment in a facility with no sign or limited sign. My child hayley is
in a christian based "camp" from 330 - 6 pm each night, and they all love
her and she them. She has flourished under this facility's care, even
though she had been in an environement with sign before. BTW I searched
High and low for appropriate placement, and this is the best. Also that
one provider never lost her license.
Mary