Course Title: Literacy Assessment and Intervention
Course Number: SPED 43313/53313
Time/Location: Spring 1998; Mon. 4:30-7:00 pm; 107 White Hall
Instructor: Dr. Pamela Luft, 405Q White Hall, 672-2294
Office Hours: Mon. 1:30-4:00 pm, 7:00-7:30; Tues. 2:30-4:00 pm, Wed. 7:00-7:30.

Catalog Description: Theoretical overview of integrated linguistics curriculum. Reading theories: top-down, bottom-up, and integrated approaches and characteristics of successful deaf readers. Difficulties and barriers for students with significant hearing loss and auditory processing difficulties for each approach; remaining fluency and achievement barriers for older students. Instructional planning and modification, materials design and adaptation, and ongoing assessment strategies. Course includes an internship placement.

Accommodations: In accordance with University policy, if you have a documented disability and require accommodations to obtain equal access in this course, please contact the instructor at the beginning of the semester or when given an assignment for which an accommodation is required. Students with disabilities must verify their eligibility through the Office of Student Disability Services (SDS) in the Michael Schwartz Student Services Center (672-3391).

Content Outline:

Theoretical overview of reading theories: top-down, bottom-up, and integrated approaches and characteristics of successful deaf readers.

Difficulties and barriers of bottom-up/phonics-based approaches for students with significant hearing loss and auditory processing difficulties.

Essential reading practices: individual reading, group reading, developmental reading--functional print, language experience, DRTA, retelling procedure; word-attack and comprehension strategies.

Essential writing practices: steps of the writing process, mechanics/conventions of writing, functional materials, selective correction

Fluency and achievement barriers for older students.

Instructional planning and modification, materials design and adaptation, and ongoing assessment strategies.

Textbooks:

    Bailes, C., Searls, S., Slobodzian, J., & Staton, J. It’s your turn now: Using dialogue journals with deaf students

    French, M., Hallau, M., & Ewoldt, C. KDES curriculum guide: Language arts. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

    Perspectives: Whole language folio II. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

    Schirmer, B. R. (1994). Language and literacy development in children who are deaf. New York: Macmillan.

    Schleper, D. Prereading strategies. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

    Welsh-Charrier, C. C. The literature journal. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

Resource texts:

    Fisher, S. The writer’s workshop. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

    KDES Preschool Faculty and Staff. KDES curriculum guide: Preschool curriculum guide. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

    MSSD English Faculty. A closer look: The English program at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

    MSSD English Faculty. Sharing ideas: The reading and writing series. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.]

    Supalla, S., & Bahan, B. ASL literature series: Teachers guide and videotape. (DawnSignPress).

    Val, S. None so deaf. Washington, DC: Gallaudet University Pre-College Programs.

Instructional Objectives:
1. Students will compare and contrast the theoretical/philosophical differences between top-down, bottom-up, and integrated approaches to reading.
2. Students will describe the developmental patterns and characteristics of successful deaf readers.
3. Students will describe the difficulties and barriers associated with using bottom-up/phonics-based approaches for students with significant hearing loss and auditory processing difficulties.
4. Students will describe the difficulties and barriers, applications, and modification of top-down approaches with D/HH students.
5. Students will describe the difficulties and barriers with using integrated word-attack and comprehension strategies.
6. Students will describe literacy fluency and achievement barriers for older students and describe strategies/develop materials strategies for minimizing these barriers.
7. Students will describe developmental reading patterns at the preschool, primary, upper elementary, middle school, and high school age levels.
8. Students will develop an integrated literacy unit for one age level demonstrating appropriate instructional planning and modification, materials design and adaptation, and ongoing assessment strategies.
9. Students will receive positive evaluations from staff regarding their conduct, interaction, sign language skills, maturity, responsibility, and performance which will be used in evaluating their readiness to progress toward student teaching.

Course Requirements:
1. Unless specified, all work must be typed so that it is clear and easy to read.
2. Any reference works cited must be done in APA style using the 1994 edition.
3. Graduate students will have a graduate project to be determined according to special interests.

Course Projects and Activities:
1. Integrated thematic literacy unit 20 pts.
2. Reading lesson plans and demo (2 sets) 10 pts.
3. Student Journals (from internship) 10 pts.
4. Student Reading Portfolio (from internship) 20 pts.
5. Dialogue Journal (using e-mail) 10 pts.
6. Two Exams 30 pts.

Grading Scale:

Undergraduate Students Graduate Students
90 - 100 pts = A 93 - 100 pts = A
80 - 89 pts = B 82 - 92 pts = B
70 - 79 pts = C 70 - 81 pts = C
60 - 69 pts = D
0 - 59 pts = F

Scope and Sequence:

1/25 Introduction; Review of Literacy KDES 1-19 Glossary 145-156; Schirmer 2-30
2/1 Theories: Whole Language and The Reading Process vs. Basal Readers Skills Approach; Dialogue Journals  Folio I--p. 1& 8; Folio II--p. 5                               Schirmer 108-122; WS 1-3                                  Bailes Ch. 1-2; Folio II--p. 42
2/8 Language Development & Emergent Literacy Bilingualism and Deafness Dialogue Journals, Lesson Planning Schirmer, 6-30, 75-81, 122-132; Schleper              WS 4-9; Schirmer pp. 86-104; Folio II--p. 9        Bailes Ch. 3-4, WS 77-92
2/15  

 

Language Assessment and Intervention Through-The-Air Strategies                     Language Sample and Analysis                 Dialogue Journals Schirmer 31-46; KDES 125-144                         KDES 168-169, 179-195                                Schirmer 34-37                                                        Ch. 5-6
2/22

 

 

Reading Readiness and Predictable Literature Initial Literacy Strategies, Reading Aloud   Phonics                                                       Reading Assessment Practices                  (Scored Retelling, Miscue Analysis) KDES 21-85, 211-228; WS 29-36                      KDES 200-210; WS 111-126                                WS 49-77                                                        Schirmer 144-184; KDES 229-247
3/1 Test #1 .
3/8 Integrated Reading & Writing Processes     Reading Assessment and Intervention cont.       IRI, Cloze                                                  Lesson Plan Demonstrations         Comprehension Strategies, DRTA Schirmer pp. 133-141, 184-192, 50-55, 147-172, 218-234; Folio II--p. 28, 48, 53, 81, 84;                KDES 87-103; WS 93-110, WS 127-134
3/15 Writing Assessment and Intervention                Skill Building--Spelling, Punctuation Schirmer pp. 30-46; KDES 159-67;                     Folio II--p. 55, 64, 68; WS 10-28
3/22 Writing Strategies & Assessments cont.           Skill Building--Word Identification & Phonics Schirmer pp. 172-184, 245-255
3/29 Spring Break .
4/5 Literature-Based Programs                         Lesson Plan Demonstrations Schirmer pp. 126-133; Welsh-Charrier
4/12 Integrating Skills With Context                  Thematic Literacy Programs WS 2-3, 40-48; WS 135-149                               Folio II--p. 14, 73, 77
4/19 Content Area Reading & Literacy Program Schirmer pp. 196-214;                                         Folio II--p. 34, 37, 39, 60, 87; WS 150-166
4/26 Test Two                                                           IEP & Transition Goal Development           Materials and Program Development WS 167-174                                                            WS 175-191
5/3 Parental Involvement, Literacy Issues       Graduate Projects Due (presentation) Schirmer pp. 238-244                                             WS 37-39, 192-202
5/10 Literacy Unit Presentations to Class                Unit Projects Due .

  


Dialogue Journals

January 26 - May 8, 1996 (14 weeks)

Requirements:

1. E-mail contact with instructor at least once a week (student initiates dialogue on any topic: pluft@emerald.educ.kent.edu).

2. Entries of at least 3 sentences that promote a written conversation--either introduce a new conversational topic or continue a previous one.

3. Confidentiality of all journal entries from both parties unless permission is given prior to sharing (may share general issues in class or with others if no identifying information is given).


Student Journals

Due: May 4, 1996

Requirements:

1. Ask internship teacher’s permission to choose 3-4 (or more) students for written dialogue journals. It may be best to choose all in a class less than 10, particularly if some students will feel "left out."

2. Purchase or get one journal for each student (blue book type preferred--not a spiral notebook because students may be tempted to tear out pages). Designate a time and place for journal exchange and return with students. Be prepared to spend some time with particular students who are not skilled readers or writers. Include this need when determining a time/schedule. If unanticipated needs arise, remember that it is okay to change the schedule (with your teacher’s permission!!)--briefly explain to the students why this change is needed (without identifying specific problematic students or sensitive issues).

3. Ask students for permission to share their journal with KSU instructor and/or classroom teacher on a periodic basis (explain that the purpose is for you in becoming a teacher--their responses will not be graded).

4. Conduct journals twice a week with each student, if possible (more is better, especially with younger students, to give them a true sense of a "conversation"). Respond in a conversational way that provides an opportunity for literacy learning (modeling, expanding syntax, or rephrasing their work; providing key vocabulary, asking for clarification, staying on topic, and taking turns). Try to focus on topics interesting to them, especially if they are struggling. Allow the students to set the topics, pace, quantity, and style as much as possible.

5. Summarize your experience (2-3 pages) with the journals including:

a. summary of each student’s response to this experience, their progress in writing skills and engagement (skills at the beginning and end of experience), and any changes seen;

b. description of your sense of engagement with each student, how this developed, and any changes during the semester;

c. evaluation of the overall success of this experience with the students and modifications you might try with your own class.

d. copies of students’ journals or key portions (if journals are not available), such as beginning, ending, and other noteworthy portions.


Student Reading Portfolio

Due: May 11, 1998

Requirements:

1. Informal and formal assessments/evaluations: these will examine students’ reading and language skills. Assessments will include Cloze, Miscue Analysis, and Scored Retelling plus additional possible formal assessment results if available at your school (scores from standardized tests to compare). Information about each assessment should include:

a. explanation/description of procedures and protocol (form) used;

b. student responses--on paper, on the form, or notes taken on oral responses;

c. brief summary (1 page or less) of student’s performance, your strategies or interventions if used, and interpretation of results (why s/he performed in that way).

2. Strategy lessons: these will teach a specific skill or address a literacy need of the students. Lessons will include Cloze, DRTA. Written description should include:

a. explanation/description of procedure and protocol (form) used;

b. student responses--on paper, on form, or notes taken on student responses during oral lessons;

c. brief summary (1 page or less) of student’s performance, the success of your strategies or interventions, and interpretation of results (why s/he performed in that way).

3. Choose one student you have worked with to examine in depth. Collect copies of his/her work throughout your practicum. Write a summary (3-5 pages) describing your work by addressing the following:

a. summary of student’s initial performance--strengths and weaknesses;

b. summary of student’s later performance--strengths and weaknesses including identification of growth or regression areas;

c. interpretation or explanation of change in student’s behavior including strategies that were particularly successful, or problematic;

d. recommendations for further work.


Reading Lessons

Due: March 2 and April 6, 1998

Requirements:

1.Create 2 literacy lessons with your small group, one in reading, the other in language or writing. Make these creative and engaging, using a variety of teaching strategies, materials, and formats. One of these lessons should introduce a concept (use the concept development form). The lessons should be short, 10-15 minutes long (with the understanding that if you were really teaching, the students would then work on their own/in pairs etc.).

2. Develop the lessons so that you and your partner will co-teach. If responsibilities are not even, then each person should take a turn assuming lead responsibility. Work out strategies for you each to take turns throughout the presentations and how you can best work together (this is to practice for possible co-teaching in future positions you may have).

3. Prepare the lessons to teach to the class--get materials, equipment, and/or let me know if you need anything special.


Literacy Unit

Due: May 11, 1996

Requirements:

1. Unit title with description of theme and semantic web or outline of relationships between subject areas.

2. Description of the instructional level (general abilities and weaknesses) and age of students this unit addresses.

3. Description of introduction of unit to students (how it relates to their prior learning/experience; their participation in generating topics or activities).

4. General goals: 1-3 broad interdisciplinary outcomes that you plan to achieve as a result of your unit.

5. Behavioral objectives (at least two) for each of the general goals which will lead to achieving your desired outcomes (should logically lead to successful attainment of goals).

6. Lesson plans that cover key behavioral objectives (some units may be fairly broad and comprehensive). Describe the sequence of lessons to be used and how they build upon each other to achieve the broad unit goals.

Individual lesson plans should use format provided and include:

a. 4 reading lessons

b. 2 language lessons

c. 2 writing lessons

d. 2 content lessons: social studies, science, or math

e. 1 or more lessons that uses a concept-building format (provided in class) which may also be one of the 8 required lessons


Name_______________________

Grade/Age Level______________

Lesson Planning Form

1. Activity or Subject and Relationship to Unit/Theme:

 

2. Behavioral Objective(s):

 

3. Materials and Key Vocabulary:

 

4. Procedure--motivation, development, culmination:

 

5. Strategies to Evaluate Success:

 

6. Follow-up and Extensions:

 


Name_______________________

Grade/Age Level______________ Unit _____________________________

 

Concept Analysis Form

1. Identification of concept--label and definition:

 

2a. Critical attributes: Noncritical attributes:

 

3a. Examples: Nonexamples:

 

4. Presentation summary using concept attainment or formation strategies: presentation of examples & nonexamples, generating & testing hypotheses (explanation of examples/nonexamples & attributes), stating definition.

 

5. Presentation of finer discriminations (extending/expanding the concept).

 

 

Uploaded By: Debbie Slyh/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major