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EDUDEAF: Daily Living Skills Curriculum

Keywords: Curriculum Materials, Deaf Education, 7-12

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Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 21:04:40 -0400
Reply-To: gasper@msys.net
From: Gasper
Subject: Daily Living Skills Curriculum
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

This is a plea for information on a curriculum to use with high school age deaf students, who need the skills of day to day living, such as making change, keeping a checkbook, shopping at the grocery store, doing simple but common recipes, etc. My student enters high school this Fall. After a 3 hour meeting with the deaf Ed. Coordinator from my state, this is the route we determined best to try. My student is at the 2nd grade reading level, and has limited expereinces outside of home life. This is her world. As much as I would like to think it will be different, it will not. Now she is 15, and my time is running out to prepare her for the real world. She is a willing student, but there is no communication in the home, so she forgets a lot that we do. So, is there anyone out there who can point me in the direction of a tried and true curriculum? Am I doomed to start from scratch?? Please respond.

M. Gasper

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Date: Mon, 15 Jun 1998 19:39:57 -0700
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
From: DeLores
Subject: Re: Daily Living Skills Curriculum
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I don't know if there is a curriculum that is set up to address what this student needs or not. You might check with an Independent Living Center for Deaf if there is one in your area. Our local school district ended up working out a "fostering" arrangement with us and we took (at separate times) two deaf high school students into our home to live with us for two years each. Their life skills were similar to what your student appears to have. We immersed them in sign language, provided daily life/cultural experiences such as going everywhere with us (including to work at times!), teaching them to handle money and be responsible for part of our home maintenance and chores, trips on weekends as well as longer trips, had them make restaurant reservations (after teaching them how to use a TTY and relay), figure out tips, plot mileage on trips, figure out how much money we would need for utilities, mortgage, clothes, food etc, taught them to drive a car, get a license, get a part-time job etc, etc. Both of them ended up going to NTID after they graduated from high school. One is now a dorm counselor in a large Deaf School in the Midwest, the other one works for Federal Express. I think it is almost impossible for a school to make up for lack of parenting and home/community experiences in a normal school day!

DeLores Wilson

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Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 15:14:12 -0400
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
From: Noelle Reimers
Subject: Re: Daily Living Skills Curriculum
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Gasper wrote:
>This is a plea for information on a curriculum to use with high school
>age deaf students, who need the skills of day to day living, such as
>making change, keeping a checkbook, shopping at the grocery store, doing
>simple but common recipes, etc.

I can recommend one resource for developing the kinds of life skills you mention. This past year I used a book titled _Skills for Living_ by Harry Olsen, Jacqueline Maeder and Martin Noretsky, published by Gallaudet. I picked up my copy at the Gallaudet bookstore. The book is written for young adults and is divided into four sections: Skills for Living: at School, in the Home, at Work, and in the Community. Each section starts out with a story involving hearing impaired or deaf individuals. The follow up lessons, worksheets, vocabulary lists, transparency masters all focus on living skills and functional vocabulary/concepts derived from the situation in the story. For example, the Living at Home story deals with a deaf person getting into a bike accident. The follow up lessons involve filling out hospital forms, medical symptom vocabulary, reading and understand Rx directions and warnings, home safety and label warnings, home electrical appliances vacabulary and use warnings, emergency information and how to get help in an emergency, nutrition, storing foods, budgeting, and understanding billing forms. I used one of these sections each marking period as an ongoing functional skills unit. The kids really liked them. It is amazing how much of everyday information deaf kids can miss out on when they have limited communication and experiences at home. So often my kids have seen something but have no idea about the concepts behind it or the vocabulary involved. When we did the Skills at Work section, one of the concepts covered was taxes and banking (keeping a checkbook). Even tho the kids had gone with their parents to the bank on regular errands, they really had no clue about how banking works....why their parents were handing over money, what a check is for, the fact that the bank holds *your* money, not just a limitless supply. These kinds of units can be really powerful if you can hook up with field trips to the community places involved.

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Date: Wed, 17 Jun 1998 10:28:57 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
From: Candace Krepel
Subject: Re: Daily Living Skills Curriculum
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Noelle's advice is great - but it really saddens me that kids need this kind of intervention.

Another really important thing for high school kids to get (imho :*) is advocacy skills. I don't know how (or if) this is taught to most kids. My son fell through the cracks because he was not in a dhh site school. When I asked, his itinerant wrote to our senator and got a packet of materials for him. Not exactly what I had envisioned, and I certainly got the impression that I was asking for something not generally taught to deaf kids.

Kids need to know what the laws are, and what their rights are under those laws. They also need to know what to do, who to contact, if those rights have been violated. They need to know that they have a right to a visual smoke detector in the apartment they rent. They have a right to nondiscrimination in the workplace - both in getting a job in the first place, and in getting access to meetings, seminars, training, etc. Some of this stuff is stuff all kids go through. Those of us who were once young probably can remember ways that we were treated (especially in the workplace) that we would absolutely not put up with today. We accepted lousy treatment when we were young because we didn't know "they couldn't do that." But deaf kids also need to know that they have special protections, and need to know how to ensure those protections.

Candy Krepel Document 5 of 5

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Date: Wed, 17 Jun 1998 12:55:31 +500
Reply-To: bob@wt.net
From: Bob Texas Save Address Block Sender
Subject: Re: Daily Living Skills Curriculum
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Along with rights come obligations placed on someone else. When you teach these rights, the children, as well as the parents, will learn more about the child's educational rights, and the obligations of the school. Do the schools really want to educate the parents on disability laws and have the parents then demand more than the school is providing? Now, let's see which schools aren't afraid of knowledgable parents. (There are many, but not enough)

Uploaded By: Jodi Gray/KSU/Deaf Education Major