EDUDEAF: Community Advisory Committees

Key Words: Deaf Education Information, Deafness Related Issues, Additional Disorders

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Subj: Advisory Committees
Date: 97-01-14 14:13:03 EST
From: r_weiner@SACAM.OREN.ORTN.EDU (Roselle_Weiner)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Hello comrades!

Do any of you serve on advisory committees on persons with disabilities (i.e.: committees what ain't got no teeth) in your community? We are looking for ideas on how to inform towns and cities about the needs of their disabled citizens. We are looking for ideas other than deaf awareness week.

If you have done or know of people who have surveyed their communities in regard to these needs, would you please point me in that direction so we may share a copy of the results?

many thanks

Roselle

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Subj: Re: Advisory Committees
Date: 97-01-14 16:21:23 EST
From: stevel@HCDB.K12.HI.US (steve laracuente)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

First make sure you have representatives from each section of your community who are dedicated to the cause and are willing to show up to each meeting, then you go straight to the top if you have a list of issues you need to address. For example, if you advise the Governor, then go to the Governor. Also, your council members must be willing to attend other related meetings and testify at legislative hearings.

Steve Laracuente

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Subj: Re: Advisory Committees
Date: 97-01-15 09:02:43 EST
From: myared@SMTP.AED.ORG (Michael Yared)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Each state has a Disabilities Service Board. Then in each state's county, there is a County Disabilities Service Board. Some city may have it. In Virginia, the Disabilities Service Board is under the Department of Health and Human Resources. In some states, it may be under developmental disabilities council. I am trying to serve on my county and a deaf person before me served but left because the DSB refused to provide a sign language interpreter. For me, I just asked for one, and when they refused, I told the chairwoman that all DSB received state money and I threatened to complain. So, I got interpreters for all meetings. It take guts and strategies. Some discussion will be about special education because often, most public school systems will have a Parent resource Center (or Parent Educational Advocacy Training Center PETAC) and will represent the schools' viewpoints. I was surprised how much I have to teach people with wheelchairs and blind people about deafness.

Look in the blue pages under state and county and see disabilities, disability, or boards for or committees for.

Mike Yared

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Subj: Re: Advisory Committees
Date: 97-01-15 09:30:36 EST
From: dr.j@RDZ.STJOHNS.EDU (Jay Lucker)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Roselle,

One way to inform a community of the needs of the people in that community who are deaf and HoH is to have the people who are deaf and HoH write letters to the managers and owners of local stores and letters to the local newspapers about the following:

1. What simple, not too expensive adjustments the local stores can make to help and accommodate for the people with hearing loss (deaf and HoH)

2. Praising those stores which have made such accommodations.

For example, as a consultant to a local SHHH group in my area, the members and their families and friends wrote to local movie theatres regarding the fact that theatres in other areas have ALDs available for rental by people who are HoH. Yet, in the local community, the multiplex theatre did not have such devices. In the letters, the SHHH members told the theatre managers and owners that they and their families no longer go to that multiplex theater because of the lack of such ALDs. Well, before long (about 2 months), someone was passing by the multiplex and low and behold, there are signs all over that FM ALDs are available for use by the public in all of the theatres in the multiplex.

Well, now the members of the SHHH group for whom FM devices are usable do go to the multiplex movies, do rent the FMs (which only require leaving a drivers license and the unit is free for use at this one multiplex), and they have written letters back to the movie theatre manager and the local newspapers praising the multiplex for going out of their way to meet the needs of the HoH people in the community.

Whether the manager went out of his way is not the issue. The positive impact of such letters was that the people with normal hearing in the community have a more positive outlook on the HoH people in the community all because of one simple (and now required by ADA) adjustment......BTW, this incident occurred before the ADA law was passed.

dr.j!

Uploaded by: B.J. Lawrence / Kent State University / Deaf Education Major