PD-HH: Teaching Anticipation

Key Words: Instructional Strategies, language, k-12

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Subj: Anticipation For Our Kids
Date: 97-05-27 12:26:15 EDT
From: jillhj@pacbell.net (Jill Johnston)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

During the Memorial Day Weekend, we were looking forward to a family picnic and swimming party. We signed/talked about it a great deal, but I wasn't sure Cody understood our anticipation. (Cody age 4, deaf/hh). Anyway, we had a great time, but the experience sent me searching for ways to help Cody experience anticipation.

This morning I traveled to our local school supply store and purchased 'Surprise Pills'. These are just small sponges fit into a gelatin pill casing. As the pill dissolves, a sponge shape poops out. Cody loves to wait and watch. It also adds to signing/talking about what might pop out. What color it is, and how big. ****Any other ideas out there??

Thanks, in advance!
Jill in Fresno CA.

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Subj: Re: Anticipation For Our Kids
Date: 97-05-27 14:54:29 EDT
From: JKELLYII@aol.com
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

Jill,

One thing that we have done with Marissa, age 9, is to put important dates on the calendar. At Christmas, we have an Advent Calendar that is a count down to the big day.

We have also done the same thing when we are going on Vacation, a birthday, a holiday, etc. We also try to explain our plans to Marissa, as they are happening. I know that one field of thought is that you don't tell kids what's happening until it does so they do not become disappointed when things do not work out. I disagree with that thought. Sometimes, things, plans, whatever, do not go as planned (for whatever reason). I think kids need to be able to understand that changes do happen and things pop up, and that being able to understand those changes are just a part of life.

Good job, Jill

Jim

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Subj: Re: Anticipation For Our Kids
Date: 97-05-28 02:20:15 EDT
From: dehahn@tiac.net (Christofer deHahn)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
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To: beejatwork@aol.com

Same here. Patrick has his own calendar that came with something like 200 stickers. Every important day of the year is represented along with a whole bunch of fun events (birthday, picnic, party, vacation, etc). He puts the appropriate stickers on the appropriate days, with a little help when he needs it. This can motivate him when he's longing for something exciting to look forward to.

Chris

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Subj: Re: Anticipation For Our Kids
Date: 97-05-27 15:13:26 EDT
From: ekadlec@coe.uga.edu (Elizabeth E. Kadlec)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

Jill,

I am not a parent of a deaf child but am an Audiologist who used to babysit deaf children. On one occasion, I babysat for a weekend while the parents went on a trip around the Hawaiian islands before being transferred back to the states. The little boy knew he was to be moving soon and when his parents left, he thought they had left without him. To help him understand the concept of looking forward to the move without confusing the parent's vacation, I constructed a paperchain (like we use to decorate Christmas trees with) and I put a picture of his parents return at one of the chains, a picture of packing up the house further down the chain, a picture of him getting on the airplane still further down the chain, and finally, a picture of him in his new state on the last chain. He helped me make the chain and then every morning he would get to take a link off of the chain. It reversed his fear that his parents had left him to excitement of when they would be coming back as well as showed him on sort of a time line when he would be moving.

Elizabeth (Beth) Kadlec :) :)
Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders
University of Georgia
525 Aderhold Hall
Athens, GA 30602

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Subj: Anticipation
Date: 97-05-27 18:42:53 EDT
From: chris@webzone.net (Chris Sides)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

Just a short comment about whether to let kids know ahead of time plans so that they will anticipate it.

We learned the hard way that our daughter, now 12 yr., would make her self sick before the anticipated activity. We wanted to include our children in plans and even let them experience the disappointment that can occur. However, she will become so sick that every thing has to be stopped. Since the two boys will not keep a secret, we can not share the plans of the activity until the last minute.

I don't think this is the usual but you do have to watch for it.

Sonja chris@webzone.net

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Subj: Re: Anticipation For Our Kids
Date: 97-05-28 01:44:18 EDT
From: KELPT@aol.com
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

We used to take Polaroid pictures of all the common places we went with Alex. Then before we went out running errands I would pull out the pictures of the places we were going and sequence them in the order I planned on going. This helped Alex know where we were going and where we had been. As he got older I would sometimes let him sequence the trip or would just give him the cards in random order. He soon could give me the next picture based on familiar landmarks before we got there. It also gave him a timeline and cut down on the frustration of not being quite sure what was going on. We started this when he was about 15 months old and used it up until he was 3 or 4.

Kelly

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Subj: Re: Anticipation For Our Kids
Date: 97-05-28 02:52:01 EDT
From: wputter@dreamscape.com (walter)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

This is not really on the subject of anticipation, but the above reminded me of something I did as a communication device when my daughter became deaf at age 3 due to meningitis. I took pictures of every significant person, and thing, and place, and many really mundane things as well, and made little sequence books for daily routines like getting up and getting ready for preschool, bedtime routines, etc., and other books for places, people, things to play with, activities to do, etc. We then were able to get across what was happening and about to happen as the day progressed, (maybe this is related to anticipation after all) and when she (very quickly) learned to ask yes or no questions instead of long answer questions, we had pretty good communication worked out to fill in while we all started learning sign. It sure worked for us in that rather bleak time when we suddenly were unable to communicate to her (she continued, and still does continue to talk to us, so the breakdown was only one way). Anyone have any similar, or wildly different for that matter, stories?

Walter

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Subj: anticipation
Date: 97-05-28 04:33:25 EDT
From: rdr99@juno.com
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

Hi all. Sitting back and learning from all of you. Enjoy it greatly!!

Read about the anticipation thing. It is a hard concept, even at 9 years old, to understand a timeframe, waiting, ....

We use a calendar where we put all activities and their times. Each day we mark off the past day and read what we have on the agenda for that day. We also use this time to discuss morning, evening, how long, .... It has increased understanding and vocabulary for both of my children. Plus, I see my 9 year old, Mallory, being responsible for preparing for Karate class, packing her library books, etc...

When she was younger we used the picture book for vocabulary building. It ended up being much like a scrap book!! Fun to do as a family.

I do think it is important for the kids to learn to wait, anticipate, look forward to, or dread ( haha) events important to the family. Otherwise they may feel left out if everyone else knew - ex.. we were going to the park and everyone brought sunshades except me - or something to that scenario......

Sydney
RDR99@juno.com

Uploaded by: BJ Lawrence /Kent State University/ Deafed Major