EDUDEAF: "Choices in Deafness"

Key Words: Deaf Education Information, Deafness Related Issues, Parenting

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Subj: Re: Where does he belong?
Date: 97-02-20 23:18:10 EST
From: dr.j@RDZ.STJOHNS.EDU (Jay Lucker)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Dear Shelly and Michael,

Perhaps a good source for you is to read a book edited by Sue Schwartz titled "Choices in Deafness." The book presents case studies of children who have been involved in a variety of methods/approaches/whatever including:


These case studies are written by parents for parents.

As one professional, here's my advice: What do you feel most comfortable with for your entire family ? Remember, as you will read in Choices in Deafness there is no correct or best approach. They all work for each individual case.....and for me the definition of individual case includes your son, your other children and yourselves, your extended family, etc.

If you feel that you are and oral family, and you want you son to be part of that family, provide an oral/aural approach so long as your child is able to benefit from that approach (can be determined by professionals providing the services - incl. audiologists, SLPs, teachers of the deaf/HoH.) However, if you wish to increase your son's language, then a signed system may be most appropriate. Thus, you may be most comfortable with a total communication approach.

BTW, for me, and what I mean, total communication means TOTAL = all methods for communicating with every aspect of the society with which you feel your son will come into contact with. If your family is hearing, verbal, reading and writing, then your son should learn these skills to the best of his abilities. IF he may come into contact with those using a signed system, he should learn sigh language. And the sign language he learns should be the one he will need to use. As with any child (or person) you can always learn a language later in life. If the program at school uses a pigin sign language, then he can learn pigin sign or if they use a signed English, he should learn signed English as that is what he will use in school. He can always learn ASL if that is a language he will come into contact with.

I hope this information and advice is helpful.

dr.j!

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Subj: "Choices in Deafness"
Date: 97-02-19 18:02:31 EST
From: myared@SMTP.AED.ORG (Michael Yared)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

"Choices in Deafness: A Parents' Guide to Communication Options" by Dr. Sue Schwartz is an excellent book.

The catalog description is: "Choices in Deafness helps parents who have a child with a hearing impairment make a complex decision. They must choose a communication method for their child, after weighing the pros and cons of the various educational options and evaluating which one will best meet their child's needs at home, in school, and in the community. This expanded, updated edition explains the medical causes of hearing loss, the diagnostic process, audiological assessment, and the cochlear implant. Experts present in detail, but without bias, the following communication options: auditory-verbal approach; bilingual-bicultural approach; cued speech; oral approach and total communication. Personal stories from parents and children speaking about their choices help round out this useful guide." Excellent for universities' deaf education program.

1996, paperback, 275 pages, $16.95 from

Woodbine House
6510 Bells Mill Road
Bethesda, MD 20817-1636
1-800-843-7323
(301) 897-5838 Fax

Mike Yared

Uploaded by: B.J. Lawrence / Kent State University / Deaf Education Major