EDUDEAF: Employment Futures of Deaf Children

Key Words: Deaf Education Information, Deafness Related Issues, Deaf Culture and History

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Subj: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-01-30 15:48:35 EST
From: myared@SMTP.AED.ORG (Michael Yared)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

How would you deal with the dreams of deaf kids about jobs they want?

The deaf son of a deaf family asked his father and I whether he can become a cop. He was watching "Texas Rangers", since it has some children-related themes. The father, instead of telling deaf people cannot do this or that, told him, sure. Later, the deaf mother complained that he should have be more honest to his son. I intervened by using the "Santa Clause", where kids will grow up realizing this is a dream and not realistic.

Somehow, we got to discuss what jobs and careers are open and closed to deaf people. Here what I wrote:

Deaf can become: real estate agent; health care workers (lab, nursing, etc); social workers; PR works; engineers (all fields); business people; lawyers; computer system/programmer/developer; actors and actresses; college professors; athletes; teachers; scientists; librarians; financial managers; accountants.

I limited the careers for comparison to those which require a BA or a master's degree (VR can provided services and support for graduate school if a master's degree is required for an employment outcome, but if seeking a graduate degree for career development, VR will not be able to assist financially. VR can and must pay for an education degree, law school, medical school, and even a PH.D. degree if you still have a case open after a BA. For more reassurances, look at Indiana Department of Human Service . Fifth (590 N.E. 2nd 154) and Polkabla v. Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped of the New York State Department of Social Services (583 N.Y.S. 2d 464). My state CAP (Client Assistance Program) was really helpful when I fought my state's VR to support me in graduate school 3 years ago).

Deaf can???? with what accommodation ideas?

Teacher in hearing classroom? what's wrong being in a deaf classroom? We need more deaf teachers serving the deaf.

Pilots - some deaf people have licenses for small planes, but 747s with 300 people on board? Even with captioning and interpreting services, too real.

Judges

Communications workers - of course

medical - which specialties? Surgery, pediatrics,... Most deaf doctors are actually HOH.

Law enforcement - all (city police department; state police; sheriff; FBI; Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms; Secret Service, Drug Enforcement; Immigration + Naturalization Service, IRS agent; Marshals Service; Bureau of Prisons; Customs Service). I took part in the Saloshin Seminar, a legal/criminal justice internship at Gallaudet, and one of the field trips was to the FBI HQ. The agent who demonstrated firearms later answered our questions. One question asked by a smart woman was, "Can deaf people become FBI agents?", he replied, "Do deaf people can sellout other deaf or be labeled 'hearing' if deaf people arrested or investigated other deaf people?" He was an African-American agent who told us of being labeled 'Uncle Tom' or 'whitney' by other black people.

Military - 2.1 million jobs closed, but deaf people are serving as civilians and defense contractors (depending. If the President is a Republican, the defense budget go up, if a Democrat, it's goes down).

International relations - Foreign Service Officers, Foreign Commercial Service, Foreign Agricultural Service, Central Intelligence Agency (deaf serve as support staff but not as an operations agent), United States Information Agency. The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 cover all US properties overseas. I took the Foreign Service Exam in 1993 and I was told I was the first deaf person to take it since the State department changed the medical requirements after 2 blind persons who became FSO later. I know of a deaf computer person working in the US Embassy in Poland and transferred somewhere in South America.

The jobs above that are closed to us is really deafism (word showed up in U.K. disability related articles and in "Deafness as culture" by Edward Dolnick in the Atlantic, Sept. 1993, v.272, n.3, p37 (12).

Your in Deaf
Mike Yared

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Subj: Re: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-01-30 19:03:28 EST
From: jwright@KNOX.NET (jean wright)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

I think the father who told his son he could grow up to be a police officer was almost right on! The only things I would have altered would have been (depending on the age of the child) the way I said yes. My athletically less than average, legally blind without his glasses ... son wanted to play professional baseball. I said, "Sure, but you'll have to work ten times as hard as another guy would have, you need to change your diet, you'll need to work with your vision therapy more actively, and I'll come cheer you on at every game." Yes, he outgrew his desire to play professional ball, but he has become a long-distance runner, partly because he took me seriously when he was seven, as I took him seriously. He'll never go to the Olympic, but he has a great chance of running at the college level next year.

And why can't a hearing impaired kid be a cop? With a hearing partner, working in areas with high deaf populations? Doing DARE programs at Deaf schools? There must be a thousand other places s/he could work, and be better than some of the flat-foots out there on the beat tonight.

There are limits to what I can do, but there should be no limits on what I can dream of doing.

Jean Wright
jwright@jasper.knox.net

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Subj: Re: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-01-30 20:24:16 EST
From: stevel@HCDB.K12.HI.US (steve laracuente)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

I recently said the same to one of my deaf students who is now 9 years old. I don't see why not. Accommodations can be made. A Deaf teacher in a hearing classroom? Yes! I saw it done a long time ago. Just put an interpreter in the classroom with the Deaf teacher to do the voice while the teacher signs. The class was very successful and popular cuz it offered the students a unique perspective on things.

Steve Laracuente

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Subj: Re: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-01-31 07:37:09 EST
From: MaggieF317@AOL.COM (Thomas W. Flynn)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education) Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Mike--

I had practically the same conversation with a Deaf student last semester. In discussing Marlee Matlin, it came up that she played a cop on "Picket Fences." My student was shocked -- she wanted to go into law enforcement and was told that she couldn't because she is Deaf. "If THAT Deaf woman can be a cop, why can't I," she asked. I told her first of all, never to confuse television with reality, and then encouraged her to seek something in law enforcement that wasn't necessarily a beat cop -- store or building security, for instance, or insurance investigation. She's no longer in my class, and I really don't know what she's up to, but I hope she pursues her dream. The bad part is that Deaf have to fight harder to attain their dream, and it's already hard enough.

Tom Flynn

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Subj: Re: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-01-31 07:55:48 EST
From: BradIngrao@AOL.COM (Brad Ingrao)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Actually Marlee Matlin played a pair of twins arrested by a cop in that show. She played a trial attorney on another show.

I agree that we should encourage Deaf kids. But, as with my son, I always am a REALIST. It's not possible for a Deaf kid to be a beat cop for safety reasons. In order for someone to advance to a detective or other non-beat cop, the person must be a beat cop first.

Let's encourage our kids, but let not give them false hopes.

Brad Ingrao

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Subj: Re: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-01-31 12:45:04 EST
From: stevel@HCDB.K12.HI.US (steve laracuente)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

I have heard this often. I was told many times I could not have this job or that job "for safety reasons". What safety reasons do you have in mind? Please explain. I am curious. Every job I applied to where they told me no "for safety reasons" I was able to convince the employer to give me try and so far it has worked out. I am a teacher now and I was once told I could not teach "for safety reasons".

Steve Laracuente

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Subj: Re: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-01-31 19:43:42 EST
From: c.colchamiro@worldnet.att.net (Charles Colchamiro)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: c.colchamiro@worldnet.att.net

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

One of the instructors in my Deaf Ed program is Deaf. We have 2 interpreters in the classroom. While one interpreter is voicing the professor's lecture with eyes on the teacher, the other is monitoring the classroom for comments from the Deaf and hearing students. It's team interpreting at its finest.

Gloria

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Subj: Re: Future Employment of Deaf
Date: 97-02-01 09:45:39 EST
From: mlf001@NS1.WMC.CAR.MD.US (Michelle L. Fetterman)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

I too have seen this done. In my teacher training program, Bloomsburg University of PA, ALL elementary ed. majors, hearing or Deaf, must student teach in a public /hearing classroom. I've heard the same is done at Gallaudet, but have yet to ask around.

Michelle...grad student at WMC >

Uploaded by: B.J. Lawrence / Kent State University / Deaf Education Major