PARENTDEAF-HH: Teaching Deaf Children to Use 911

Key Words: Deaf education information, deafness related issues, parenting

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Subj: Question about teaching kids?
Date: 97-07-01 13:32:57 EDT
From: Me3me@aol.com
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

Hello Everyone!

I have a question about what to teach my deaf five year old about using the 911 emergency phone number. I don't know what to tell him to do if an emergency should happen to me (I'm a stay at home mom, the only one around this neighborhood) He doesn't know how to type on the TTY yet. He just wandered by and I asked him what he would do if I fell down and hurt myself and he couldn't wake me up and he wouldn't answer me! That's common with him though, he doesn't express himself much. I don't think he knew what to say or what to do.

I've told my almost four year old how to call 911 (he's hearing and has much more expressive language) But I really don't know what to do about my oldest son?

Does anyone have any ideas, advice, past experiences?

Mary E

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Subj: Re: Question about teaching kids?
Date: 97-07-01 17:33:43 EDT
From: acdaley@nfld.com (Daley)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

There was a movie on T.V. a while back that presented an idea that I thought was good. The woman had a pre-recorded tape in a cassette player which she left next to the phone. In case of emergency the child was to dial 911 and rest the phone on the player. The message would be something like "this is an emergency, this is the Daley residence, we live at......., we have a child who is Deaf and has been instructed to play this message in the event of an emergency..............". This seemed like a good idea to me, even in place of a TTY as I have heard some sad stories about the lack (or delay time) of response to 911 calls via TTY.

~TTFN!
*Andrea @:~)

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Subj: Re: Question about teaching kids?
Date: 97-07-01 17:46:06 EDT
From: Catjobloom@aol.com
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

When our daughter was young, pre-TTY days, we taught her to call 911 and just put the phone on the table. Most 911 systems have a tracer that identifies the address of the caller. If they do not get a response they will send out someone to check. It is also possible to contact Emergency Services and let them know there is a deaf person in the household--if they get a call from your number and no verbal response they will send help anyway.

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Subj: Re: 911 Question about teaching kids
Date: 97-07-03 03:59:41 EDT
From: MKowalc585@aol.com
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

July 2, 1997

Perhaps Philip Moos could answer some of your questions about the 911 calls for persons with TTY's. His organization, New Jersey Association of the Deaf, sponsored a meeting with AT&T and there is a developed program in New Jersey for TTY users to notify agencieis of emergencies.

When you sign up a family as having a TTY in the State of NJ, there is also a created list which police agencies can access to know where TTY's are located in the State.

Phil would have more specifics on this I am sure.

Good Luck
MaryAnne Kowalczyk

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Subj: Re: 911 Question about teaching kids
Date: 97-07-03 02:31:22 EDT
From: pmoos@pluto.njcc.com (Philip N. Moos)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

What MaryAnne said is pretty much true of how it works in New Jersey. Although, having a TTY is not always in the records of local 911 services.

You have to inform the local 911 services that you have a TTY in your home and they will put the information in their database.

Another point, not all 911 services have what is called Enhanced 911. The Enhanced 911 is suppose to easily identify those with TTYs.

In New Jersey, not all police stations are equipped with 911. For example, in some areas, it is run by a county level agency rather than the local police.

Our biggest problem to date is getting the deaf families to inform their local 911 agencies that they have a TTY in their home.

Phil

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Subj: Re: Question about teaching kids?
Date: 97-07-03 17:33:48 EDT
From: pmoos@pluto.njcc.com (Philip N. Moos)
Sender: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
Reply-to: parentdeaf-hh@amethyst.educ.kent.edu
To: beejatwork@aol.com

I would not use this approach by using a tape recording. I do not think this may be acceptable in practice as it may lead this idea to a practical joke by the 911 reciever. You are also asking the child to do more than he/she needs to do in order to relay the message.

As I mentioned before in another posting, is to inform the 911 agency that you have a deaf child in your home. If you do not have a TTY, that's okay because they will have a record in their database that there is a deaf child at that address, if they hear a silence or some strange noise.

Simply put, have the child pick up the phone, dial 911, and lay the phone off the hook next to the phone and go about what he/she needs to do next.

Phil

Uploaded by: BJ Lawrence/ Kent State University/ Deafed Major