EDUDEAF: Early Intervention Books

Key words: Deaf Education Information, books and journals, deafness specific professional resources

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Subj: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-09 15:32:33 EST
From: leibee@EN.COM (Amy Mordaunt)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Does anyone know of any current books which discuss early intervention with deaf toddlers, infants, or preschoolers? I am wanting to get my early childhood special ed validation and would eventually like to teach this age group; however I am finding very few books (I *do* have articles) OR book chapters which deal specifically with this population. If anyone has any info, you can email me directly or to the group. Thanks!

Amy Mordaunt
leibee@en.com

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Subj: Re: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-09 17:52:14 EST
From: POEMROSE@AOL.COM (Patrick Stone)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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Listening To Learn published by A. G. Bell is very good for teachers and parents. Pat Stone

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Subj: Re: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-09 17:58:42 EST
From: meccariu@UNLINFO.UNL.EDU (Malinda Eccarius)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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Amy,

This may not be exactly what you are looking for, but Boys Town Press puts out the Sign With Me series. It is aimed at parents of recently identified infants and toddlers, and rather than just teaching signs, focuses on things like creating conversations, developing concepts, and positive behavior management. The reason I bring it up is that the workbooks that are part of the package have multipage introductions which are very specifically about teaching and interacting with very young deaf children. The packages come in MCE or ASL, but the workbooks talk about communication and apply to either set. There are some other tapes: Read with Me 1,2, and 3, and Families with Deaf Children, which are also useful tools to use with parents. If you want a catalogue, the phone number is 1-800-282-6657, and the address is

Boys Town Press
13603 Flanagan Blvd.
Boys Town Nebraska 68010.

Also, the Parent Infant team at Boys Town Research Hospital has put together quite a parent library of books, some of which might be helpful to you. I suggest you email Debbie Veazey or Sharon Wood: veazeyd@boystown.org or wood@boystown.org. with your question. Neither is on edudeaf, but I am sure they would be glad to tell you about any good books they have found.

Hope this is helpful.
Malinda Eccarius

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Subj: Re: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-09 23:17:38 EST
From: rbrown@SOPHIA.SMITH.EDU (Rebecca Brown)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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Amy,

Two books you may want to explore:

1. Hearing Impairments in Young Children, by Arthur Boothroyd. Published by AG Bell Association, 1988. This is a great beginning resource that examines all aspects of early intervention and gives very practical suggestions for teachers.

2. Parent-Infant Intervention, edited by A. Simmons-Martin and D.R. Calvert. Published by Grune & Stratton, NY, 1979. An older book, but a good general resource.

Hope this is helpful. Good luck!

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Subj: Re: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-10 07:39:06 EST
From: BradIngrao@AOL.COM (Brad Ingrao)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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Amy,

Beginnings in NC has a very comprehensive guide, and I'm developing a section of a web site for this.

I had mentioned this before and got some samples from other members (thanks) but now have more resources and space available, and would like to really get this moving. Perhaps a joint EAA project with a referral list?

I'm game for anything, and have 30 MB to play with, so space isn't an issue.

Brad Ingrao
Jax FL
http://www.bradingrao.com (not much there yet)

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Subj: Re: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-10 10:13:07 EST
From: henne@MOOSE.NCIA.NET (John & Robin Henne)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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There's an excellent book called "Parent Infant Communication" that's been around for a while and still is as good as ever. It covers developmental ages 0 to about 4, and gives information to use with parents learning about hearing loss and communication decisions. It also lists developmental sequence of communication skills and gives lots of activities to do with child/model for parents. I don't have the publisher/distributor information here at home with me, but can send it for you later if you don't come across it elsewhere.

Robin --

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Subj: Re: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-10 14:25:12 EST
From: shc@TENET.EDU (Sha H Cowan)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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I'm responding from Texas, where we do use the SKI-HI curriculum with deaf/hard of hearing infants and toddlers and their families.

SKI-HI materials and information can be obtained from the SKI-HI Institute, Utah State University, 809 North 800 East, Logan, Utah 84322-1900. They have a toll-free number, also, which is 1-800-396-6144. Their e-mail address is skihi@cc.usu.edu and the fax number is 801-755-0317; the phone number is 801-752-4601. Don Barringer is the Director of the SKI-HI Institute.

The state of Texas has been using this program with young deaf/hard of hearing children for the past 15 years. It is a very good curriculum which now includes units on deaf culture, role models, ASL as well as the traditional areas of communication, language, auditory training, etc. All of the "parent advisors" who work with this population of children and their families have been trained in the SKI-HI curriculum. In Texas, all of our parent advisors are certified teachers of the deaf, however, not paraprofessionals, as our state rules require services by a certified teacher of the deaf for deaf/hard of hearing infants and toddlers.

Sha H. Cowan (512) 463-9424
Texas Education Agency shc@tenet.edu
Services for the Deaf
1701 N. Congress Avenue
Austin, TX 78701
FAX (512) 475-3720

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Subj: Re: early intervention books
Date: 97-03-15 18:14:04 EST
From: btuck@VARNEY.IDBSU.EDU (Brandon M Tuck)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
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To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Amy,

I recently completely research that dealt with the benefits of early intervention in language acquisition. I've enclosed below cuts from the bibliography and some comments about the materials.

Good luck,
Brandon M Tuck

Donaldson, Margaret. "The Desire to Learn." Issues and Perspectives: Reading and Writing in Communities. Ed. Richard P. Batteiger. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1992. ****This is actually a chapter out of a book of hers...inside she refers to excellent studies done by a man named Hanus Papousek.

Goldin-Meadow, Susan and Carolyn Mylander. Gestural Communication in Deaf Children: The Effects and Noneffects of Parental Input on Early Language Development. Vol 49, Nos 3-4 of Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1984. ******This may look somewhat outdated, but Goldin-Meadow and Mylander have numerous research projects on the topic, many of which can be found in the American Annals.

Kretschmer, Richard R. Jr. and Laura W. Kretschmer. Language Development and Intervention with the Hearing Impaired. Baltimore, Maryland:University Park Press, 1978. *******The Kretschmers focus on the timing of voal aquisition, which serves as an effective comparision when talking about sign language development in deaf children.

Schlesinger, Hilde S. "The Acquisition of Signed and Spoken Language." Deaf Children: Developmental Perspectives. Ed. Lynn S. Liben. New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1978.

Uploaded by: B.J. Lawrence / Kent State University / Deafed Major