EDUDEAF: Educational Interpreting

Key Words: Deaf education information, Deafness related issues, Deaf Education

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Subj: Educational Interpreting
Date: 97-01-28 16:07:35 EST
From: myared@SMTP.AED.ORG (Michael Yared)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

A coworker gave me this request from someone. "We are establishing guidelines, job descriptions on educational interpreting as a part of our new program. Currently we are working on getting funding (and permission) for hiring a 'relief' or substitute interpreter. Our interpreters at the high school level work long hours with no breaks and have few substitutes to choose from when they are sick. Do you know of any established guidelines or have any information that might let us 'sell' our idea to the School Board?" Any information?

The only things I can find on educational interpreting is:

"Educational Interpreting and Teacher Training: An Interdisciplinary Model" by Edgar Shroyer and Mary Compton in American Annals of the Deaf, Dec 1, 1994, v.139, n.5.

"Characteristics and Practices of Sign Language Interpreters in Inclusive Education Programs" by Bernhardt Jones, Gary Clark, and Donald Soltz in Exceptional Children, Winter 1997, vol.63, n.2.

Mike Yared
Washington DC

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Subj: Re: Educational Interpreting
Date: 97-01-30 11:06:22 EST
From: ckrepel@POST.ITS.MCW.EDU (Candace Krepel)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Our system has a particularly abysmal system for procuring substitute interpreters. If a teacher is sick, the teacher calls the appropriate office, and the office is responsible for finding a sub. If an interpreter is sick, the interpreter is responsible for finding his/her own sub. Kind of conjures up images of a 'terp with the flu alternating between phone calls and trips to the bathroom. If no sub is found, the child has no interpreter. Of course, that puts the regular teacher in the position of either ignoring the deaf student, or throwing out the day's lesson plan and trying to do things that will be accessible.

I would strongly urge that your system put responsibility for finding terp subs in the same office with sub teachers.

(Sorry...hot button)

Candy Krepel

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Subj: Re: Educational Interpreting
Date: 97-01-30 12:38:38 EST
From: stevel@HCDB.K12.HI.US (steve laracuente)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

We need to do the same here in Hawaii too. We have a "Job Description for Educational Interpreters" lying somewhere in the Dept. of Ed. bureaucracy. Nobody knows what it is or where it is.

Steve Laracuente

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Subj: Re: Educational Interpreting
Date: 97-01-31 07:37:09 EST
From: MaggieF317@AOL.COM (Thomas W. Flynn)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

Micahel, Candy, and Steve --

I guess I didn't know how good I've got it until I read your posts. The St. Louis Special School District has full-time interpreters, full-time agency placement interpreters, and a contract with a local agency to provide relief interpreters in cases of illness, meeting, convention, etc... Those who sign on as relief interpreters with the agency have to go to an orientation meeting hosted by the SSD, and are given a packet of information -- standards, expectations, etc...

All full-time interpreters, staff or agency, have a folder in their school office. When the sub shows up, we pick up the folder, which has info on the client, Sign mode, classes, schedules, building layout, parking, and the price of lunch. We note, throughout the day, any info the full-timer will need when they return (scheduled tests, field trips, new vocab).

I worked everything from first grade through senior year of high school last semester, and the system usually worked nicely. I oughta thank my lucky stars, huh?

Tom Flynn

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Subj: Re: Educational Interpreting
Date: 97-02-03 16:11:36 EST
From: COBBL@MAIL.FIRN.EDU (Linda Cobb 904 453-7425)
Sender: EDUDE