Speech Stimulation and Auditory Awareness

PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO

IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION

TURN-TAKING

VOCABULARY ENHANCEMENT

ACTIVITIES

RESOURCES

MONTHLY ACTIVITIES

QUESTIONS

ELEMENTS OF AN EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM





















Once an infant or toddler has received amplification and is wearing his/her hearing aids consistently, parents should provide their "child with stimulation activities designed to help develop auditory memory for sound patterns and pitch changes as well as to develop vowels and consonants."

The early interventionist should show parents how to incorporate speech stimulation and auditory awareness during play activities, daily routines, and child-care activities. Parents will need to provide their child with as many opportunities as possible to produce the sound by him/herself and then to reinforce their child's attempt.

There are several important aspects to keep in mind. First, it is important that parents attach speech sounds to meaningful experiences throughout the day. Parents will need to motivate, encourage, and stimulate their child to use their voice in a pleasurable, useful, and enjoyable way. Secondly, parents will need to motivate their child to listen to the various environmental and speech sounds around them, so they will become meaningful to their child. Parents will need to be aware of the noises in their child's environment and learn how to attach meaning to those sounds. Finally, parents will need to increase their child's attention to both environmental and speech sounds in their environment.

Parents can do this by recognizing their child's responses to sounds, using clues, and reinforcing their child's attempts. Here a few tips for parents that will provide a better opportunity for their child to hear and pay attention: get close and be at eye or ear level, use facial expressions to get and keep your child's attention, wait for him or her to look, listen, or respond to your interaction, and keep background noise down.

Resources:

Clark, T. and Watkins, S. (1993). The Ski*Hi Model: A Resource Manual for Family-centered,

Home-Based Programming for Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool-Aged Children with
Hearing Impairment. Hyrum, Utah: Hope, Inc.

Roush, J. and Matkin, N. (1994). Infants and Toddlers with Hearing Loss. Baltimore, MD: York

Press.