Turn-Taking

PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO

IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION

SPEECH STIMULATION AND AUDITORY AWARENESS

VOCABULARY ENHANCEMENT

ACTIVITIES

RESOURCES

MONTHLY ACTIVITIES

QUESTIONS

ELEMENTS OF AN EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM













Turn-taking is the process that involves back and forth exchanges between parents and their child. Once parents recognize their child's communication cues, they can respond to their child and use this skill to develop effective communication interaction. To help develop turn-taking with their child, they will need to respond positively to their child, allow for their child to respond back to them (wait time), and reinforce their child's attempts.

Parents can use turn-taking with their child when they are playing at home. There are a variety of ways they can incorporate this into their daily routine at home. Parents can use this skill by playing a simple game of peek-a-boo, stacking blocks, rolling the ball to helping mom or dad in the kitchen and around the house.

Once parents have established this turn-taking skill with their child, they will need to increase the number of their interactions between them and their child. One way to accomplish this is to recognize which activities interest and do not interest their child. This will tell parents which activities will help develop this interactive turn-taking skill that will help their child lead to successful communication and language growth.

Remember, in the beginning parents will need to lead the interaction until their child begins to initiate the interactions with them.

Resources:
Clark, T. and Watkins, S. (1993). The Ski-Hi Model: A Resource Manual for

Family-Centered, Home-Based Programming for Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool-Aged
Children with Hearing Impairment. Hyrum, Utah: Hope, Inc.

Jamieson, J.R. (1995). Interactions Between Mothers and Children Who are Deaf. Journal of

Early Intervention, 19(2), 108-117.