EDUDEAF: Writing Children's Stories

Keywords: Information, Deafness Related Issues, Deaf Education

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Date: Thu, 14 Nov 1996 14:36:15 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Writing Children's Story
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

On Thu, 14 Nov 1996, Johnson, George (M&C Don) wrote:

> Hello, everyone. This is George Johnson, one of the lurking, non-posting parents. I have a couple of items this morning.

> I am taking a Critical Reading and Writing class at our local university. Our final assignment is to write a research paper (something I have never done before). The instructor recommended that we write on something we have a personal interest in. One of the suggested assignments was to read/review several children's books targeted at a particular age group and then write our own children's story. After writing my own story I would have to critique it. I thought I might read/review several books targeted at deaf/hh children in the 4 to 7 y/o range and then write a story to the same audience. The instructor gave his reserved approval with the stipulation that the analytical paper be argumentative. Something along the line of "This author/story is better than that story because....." "This is a better way to write a story for deaf children than that way because....." The instructor wants me to spend most of the effort doing actual research not writing the story. Two questions: Does this seem like a "doable" project? What are suggestions for books to read and review? ANY and ALL feedback would be appreciated.

> George in Idaho

George,

I wanted to share with you that I think that this is a great idea for a project and totally doable. I think that it is something that has not been done too much in the past and that is why you are having your reservations. I wanted to let you know that I have some great books that I may be able to share with you. Give me a couple of days, if that is o.k. and I'll see what I can come up with. I have to look through some of my things, but I am pretty sure I have a few things that would be of value to your project. Don't despair :). Please contact me if you do not get any word from me within the next few days. Sometimes life gets crazy and I tend to forget things, but I will keep your project in mind.

Becky Morris

Document 2 of 6

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Date: Thu, 14 Nov 1996 22:42:41 EST
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Writing Children's Story
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

On Thu, 14 Nov 1996 07:49:00 -0700 Johnson, George (M&C Don) said:

>thought I might read/review several books targeted at deaf/hh children in the 4 to 7 y/o range and then write a story to the same audience.

This brings up an interesting thought about books written specifically for children who are deaf. Of course I am aware of the Flying Fingers Club series which has a deaf main character. But, I would not say that these books are written only for children who are deaf. Also, they are for children who are a bit older than the 4-7 range.

But, my questions are: What kinds of books or stories would one write FOR deaf kids? WHY would these be different than any other children's stories? Would they also be of interest to hearing kids? Why would one read different kinds of stories or books to 4-7 year old deaf kids? Just wondering.

Cathy - who lately doesn't use the word "shoot down" too lightly in view of where she spends a lot of her time :)

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Date: Thu, 14 Nov 1996 23:13:12 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Writing Children's Story
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Well, as a deaf kid, I would want the child to encounter some of the same frustrations that I did...wearing a hearing aid, receiving speech therapy, missing class, having makeup work, etc.. I would like the hero/heroine to be deaf/hoh and somehow find a special strength/power which results from their "disability" that really makes them more capable than the hearing kids. I would like to be the leader of a group of children, both hearing and deaf and have them all be able to communicate with me and each other. Then, I would want it to be like any other book that hearing kids like.

My two cents...offered from the perspective of a hearing adult, remembering her childhood favorites and superimposing that perspective on my knowledge of what Alex likes.

Linda S

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Date: Sat, 16 Nov 1996 19:22:38 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Writing Children's Story
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi George-

Sounds like the instructor is asking you to think about bibliotheraphy...you may want to check the research on that before you review your selection of books. That is, what makes one book on a topic (e.g, death, moving, divorce) better for an audience than another. We've found that it is what the parents/teachers say and discuss about the book and topic that makes the biggest difference.

I'd be interested in hearing what you come with on this topic.

Barbara K. Strassman
The College of New Jersey (formerly Trenton State College)

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Date: Sun, 17 Nov 1996 09:51:36 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Writing Children's Story
Comments: To: Cathy Brandt
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi all,

Going to take advantage of this opportunity to chime in with 2cents worth and say deaf kids want to know about their heritage...write about Laurent Clerc and THG and Cogswell (Alice and Mason) write about the history of the founding of schools and famous people who attended them and how they fared later in life. But be sure to do your research thoroughly!!!

regards.
Roselle
American School for the Deaf

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Date: Mon, 18 Nov 1996 14:28:42 -0600
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Writing Children's Story
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

I think your project sounds wonderful. Before I start I would determine which area of the cognitive process I want to stimulate and the age group.

A picture book would be a wonderful book for deaf or hearing children. They are very visual and children can tell the story over and over again using their creativity. The main character can be deaf or HOH or whatever. The possibilities are endless. If you've never seen a picture book take a look at the "Carl" series. ("Carl goes to daycare" is an example)

These books do not have words but it allows the imagination to run wild.

Jennifer- very interested pre-k programs for the deaf or hoh

Uploaded by: Jessica Soltesz/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major