EDUDEAF: Speech/Language Activities

Key Words: Instructional Strategies, Language, K-12

Document 1 of 4

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Date: Wed, 6 Nov 1996 19:46:20 -0800
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Speech/Language Activities?????
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hello,

I have been following this list for quite some time and enjoy reading all of the wonderful ideas and the support that you share.

I have a 3 year old son who was diagnosed with a moderate/severe sensorineural hearing loss at 18 mos of age. He wears hearing aids...we've been told it is a "flat" loss but more pronounced in the high frequency range. He has a wonderful vocabulary and loves to speak. He has dropped his use of signing and feels really comfortable communicating orally. We read to him many times each day and are always looking for opportunities to enrich his vocabulary. I am very actively involved and interested in working with him, on his speech, at home.

He also sees a speech therapist once a month and we receive visits from a teacher for the hard of hearing once a week.

We have recently had an assessment of his speech/language during a routine neo-natal follow up clinic at Children's Hospital. The speech/language path ologistwas concerned that our son should be receiving more active and intense speech therapy. She said this because our son is very verbal and has a really good grasp of spoken language and she thinks he could be speaking much better than he is right now. He seems to do okay when he is saying single words but his speech begins to break down when he forms sentences. It becomes hard to understand him and he sometimes gets frustrated. She seemed to think he needed to receive therapy at least 2 - 3 times a week. We are receiving services from the Elks Family Hearing Resource Center on a weekly basis. It is a really wonderful program.

I am looking for input from any teachers or speech/language pathologists who are on the list. I want to work with my son at home on his speech. Unfortunately I am not aware of any information about specific speech activities / games / drills that we can use in a home setting. I feel very strongly about helping my son as much as possible at home, in addition to the support services he is receiving from his speech therapist and the teacher for the hard of hearing. They both have some ideas of ways I can help him but suggested that I turn to this list for other input.

He is having trouble with the following speech sounds:
Blends..... dr, br, pl, sl, st
Single Sounds......

I am also interested in information about teaching lipreading in a home setting.

Any ideas or information that you may have will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Brandy 8^D
British Columbia, Canada

Document 2 of 4

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Date: Thu, 7 Nov 1996 09:03:09 EST
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Speech/Language Activities?????
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Brandy --

You should contact the John Tracy Clinic in California. They have an orally-based correspondence course for preschool deaf children. Their services are free.

Their home page is http://www.johntracyclinic.org/JTC/homepage.htm

For those without Web access, the contact information is:
806 West Adams Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90007-2599
(213) 748-5481 or (800) 522-4582, TTY (213) 747-2924, Fax (213) 749-1651
Email: hecht@mizar.usc.edu

Gerald Sacks

Document 3 of 4

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Date: Thu, 7 Nov 1996 11:34:10 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Su bject: Re: Speech/Language Activities?????
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hi Brandy,

I am the mother of a 7 year old oral deaf child. We have had daily speech therapy since the time she was diagnosed deaf (at 7 months of age).

We do minimal pair discrimiantion: peas, versus please, sleeves, breeze, Steve.

Sometimes blends are a problem with one of the following vowels only. E.g. the child might have problems saying "sleeve" but no problems with "sloppy". In this case the "sl" sound is easier detectable with the vowel "o" following. By training with "slo..." and "slu..." words and comparing them with "slee.." words, you can teach the discrimination.

We provide visual clues by pointing to the visible tongue in the "sl" word. e.g. "sleeve" versus "sieve" or "see".

For discrimiating "V, F" from "TH" we hold a lightweight paper or feather in front of the mouth to teach that even if not heard, there is airflow. The airflow should go down for "V and F" and should come out straight for "TH". In order to teach, you could show that the feather does not move if held straight in front of the mouth for the "F" sound, but does for the "TH" sound. For the "H" sound we try to make a mirror foggy with our breath.

Sometimes the "V" might be hard to detect in the final position but is easily detected if the plural ending follows. "sleeve" versus "sleeves" . In the second case the "v" sound is followed by a "s" sound which makes the "v" sound emerge.

For "ing" we put the forefinger on the nose to make the nasal sound visible.

The "D", "T", "G" and "K, C, CK" sounds are very very similar in their sound pattern. To discriminate between, "D, T" and "G,K,CK," we teach that the tongue in the first case touches the teeth and in the second case moves back. We put a colored M&M candy on the tonguetip to show how it moves back for the "K" type sounds.

For "s" and "Z" we elongate the sound to make the child aware of it. The "s" is sharper than the "Z" . Compare "Sue" and "Zoo".

To elongate sentences we use rhythm. E.g. The (clap) elephant (clap,clap,clap) is (clap) hungry (clap, clap). This is to experience multisyllable words and speech rhythm.

All these things are only used in a teaching situation with the speech pathologist or me teaching my child the dicrimination. In a normal conversation we talk with normal pace and volume and without any visual clues.

Hope this is of some help, Birgit
Birgit Woelker

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Date: Thu, 7 Nov 1996 14:23:28 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Re: Speech/Language Activities?????
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Brandy,

Yesterday afternoon Kathleen Daniel Sussman, Principal of the Jean Weingarten Peninsula Oral School in Redwood City, California, gave our staff and graduate students a lecture/demonstration of the rhythmic phonetics program that she & her staff implemented a few years ago at her school. It is a modern adaptation of a speech-development method developed by Petar Guberina in Zagreb, Yugoslavia (now Croatia) in the 1950's and known then as the Verbo-tonal method. It is a most intriguing method that incorporates aspects music, poetry, choreography and pragmatics into a program of speech development. They have produced a 30-minute video to instruct parents and professionals in the use the method as a teaching tool with young children. It is available from the school for only $30.00, a real bargain...no, I am not getting a commission. If you want more information, or to buy the video, you can contact Kathy at:

jwposd@aol.com

Alan L. Marvelli Smith College/Clarke School for the Deaf
Graduate Teacher Education Program
Northampton, MA 01063
413-585-3050
almarvel@sophia.smith.edu

Uploaded by: Jessica Soltesz/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major