EDUDEAF: Assessment of Hearing Impaired Learning Disabled

Key Words: Deaf Education Information, Deafness Related Issues, Additional Disorders

Document 1 of 2

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Date: Sun, 3 Nov 1996 19:36:27 -0500
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Hearing Impaired Learning Disabled
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Hello:

I have just completed a paper for my graduate program on hearing impaired learning disbaled students. I am interested in finding more information on this topic. Does anyone have any suggestions on where I could look? The inforamation I used to write a section of my paper was very little. Mostly the articles told me that HILD students need HILD trained teachers to teach them in order to meet the student's needs. I am extremely interested in both fields. I woulds also like to know - if anyone thinks that in the future they may be a demand for HILD trained teachers or is this just another passing thought?

Thanks for your help.
Look forward to hearing from you

Cathie
Catherine Trayers
M.E.D. Smith College/Clarke School for the Deaf

Document 2 of 2

Document: 1 2

Date: Sun, 3 Nov 1996 13:53:16 +0100
Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education
Subject: Hearing Impaired Learning Disabled
To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Cathie,

Last April I attended a conference (with several other list members, no doubt) in Seattle WA, titled "Neuropsychology, Learning Disabilities, and Deaf Youth," sponsored by Ohlone College, the University of Washington, I think Gallaudet, and various others. It was several days of invited presentations and incredible amounts of information--too much to include here. The general consensus seems to be that although most legal definitions of learning disabilities exclude deaf and hard of hearing children, there are ways to identify learning difficulties in this population. Among the suggestions:

Use tests normed on the deaf and look for greater than one standard deviation differences in performance. The problem, of course, is the size of a standard deviation when the normative population is deaf. It is very hard to score outside the average range.

Use neuropsychological testing. The problem with this is knowing what the impact of abnormal results might have on academic functioning.

At the end of the conference, it was agreed that the research in this field is vital, but in its infancy, certainly not to the point of making classroom recommendations. Follow up conferences are planned. Meanwhile, nothing takes the place of a thorough academic/communication/psychological assessment, combined with an environmental assessment and direct observation of the student in the context of daily classroom demands. LD or not, if there is a problem, extended diagnostic teaching can be used to try to address it.

Malinda

Uploaded by: Jessica Soltesz/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major