EDUDEAF: Speech Therapy

Key Words: Insrtuctional Strategies/Deaf Ed./preK

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Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 21:32:35 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Subject: Re: Speech Therapy

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

On Tue, 10 Sep 1996, Anna Wilson wrote:

I have a question for any one that can answer: When do you start speech therapy with a deaf/hoh child? I was asked this from a Spec. Ed teacher because I have a deaf son, My response was that you wait until about 2 yrs old or until the child can attend. The Spec. Ed teacher had asked the local teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing and was told that they wouldn't start speech until the child could make so many certain sounds in speech. The Spec. ed teacher was very confused by this.... how is the child going to learn to repeat speech without speech therapy? Does any one know of some basic guidelines as to when to start speech with a deaf child.

Anna
wlsp06@minn.net

I think that you can definitely start them at 2 or the latest 3 years old. Granted they do not have much attention span, but speech lessons can be very informal when you play with the children.

Illinois State X-Sender: i727663@mail.mtsi.com

Document 2 of 5

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Date: Thu, 12 Sep 1996 23:00:48 -0500

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Subject: Re: Speech Therapy

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

My deaf children started speech therapy at one year old. Their attention span was minimal and the teacher and speech therapist came to our home. With my second deaf child they quickly changed their time with her to very early in the morning. I can recall them crawling around the floor with my child and grabbing a minute here and there as they got her attention to continue with the lesson. They started bringing a change of clothes with them to our home because once they finished with my child they needed a shower before continuing on with work for the day.

DeLores Wilson
dhag@mtsi.com

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Date: Fri, 13 Sep 1996 11:57:33 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Subject: Re: Speech Therapy

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

My daughter became deaf after having had meningitis at the age of 7 months.

We started speech therapy when she was 7 months old. If she had been deaf from birth I would have started immediately. Speech therapy then was not focussed on repeating words properly, it more was giving the child an environment full of sounds and get the child to pay attention to sound and rhythm. Sound discrimination was e.g. to distinguish 2 strokes on a drum from 3 strokes on a drum. We made bubbles with saliva and held the childs hand on the throat to feel vibration or on the mouth to feel the "h" sound. In addition, we did things you do with a hearing baby, just trying to make the sounds visible or feelable. Many repetitions and play with bababa and tshutshutshutshu sounds. I recommend the book "Language through Living" by Morag Clark, Hoddler and Stoughton (London, Great Britain) ISBN-0-340-50537-0 but I just learned it is not so easy to get in the US.

Birgit
birgit@asterix.bio.sunysb.edu

Document 4 of 5

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Date: Sat, 14 Sep 1996 13:23:41 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Subject: Re: Speech Therapy

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

In a new book by Shawn Neal Mashie (1995), Educating Deaf Children Bilingually (published by Pre-College Programs, Gallaudet University) there is a section on "Critical Period and Spoken Language" (pp. 94-101). The author differentiates between acquiring ("a subconscious process") and learnin g (being formally taught which is a conscious process) language. It is definitely worth purchasing and reading.

Gina Marie Tanza
GMTanza@aol.com

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Date: Tue, 17 Sep 1996 08:54:02 -0400

Reply-To: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Sender: A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education

Subject: Re: Speech Therapy

To: Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF

Exactly so. Hearing children don't respond with language for a while either, but everything going in is being processed and is laying the groundwork for understanding language. The rule of thumb that we always quote is that you need around 200 repetitions *in meaningful context* in order to master a piece of vocabulary, language concept, or whatever. With deaf/hh kids accessibilty of that language in the meaningful context is obviously critical also. So starting early, using whatever means but in a carefully intentional manner, is providing normal language input in a way more accessible for the child.

Robin

Uploaded by: Jessica Soltesz/Kent State University/Deaf Education Major