EDUDEAF: Educational Interpreters

Key Words: Deaf Education Information, Deafness Related Issues, Deaf Education

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Subj: Re: Licensing Educational Interpreters
Date: 96-12-31 11:37:44 EST
From: shc@TENET.EDU (Sha H Cowan)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

This is Sha Cowan, from the Texas Education Agency responding to the question about licensing educational interpreters.

> Does your state license educational interpreters and if so who is the licensing body? > > If anyone can refer me or give ideas on gathering statutes, please e-mail me at rmiller@nchi.state.ne.us >

In Texas, the Texas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (TCDHH), through the Board for Evaluation of Interpreters (BEI) licenses interpreters. There is not a separate licensure for educational interpreters. The executive director of TCDHH is David Myers, and his email address is dmyers@access.texas.gov

Sha H. Cowan (512) 463-9424 Texas Education Agency shc@tenet.edu Services for the Deaf 1701 N. Congress Avenue Austin, TX 78701

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Subj: "Characteristics and practices of sign language interpreters in inclusive educat
Date: 97-01-02 15:26:39 EST
From: myared@SMTP.AED.ORG (Michael Yared)
Sender: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)
Reply-to: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (A Practical Discussion List Regarding Deaf Education)

To: EDUDEAF@LSV.UKY.EDU (Multiple recipients of list EDUDEAF)

This article is in Exceptional Children, vol.63, n.2, Winter 1997. It is a Council for Exceptional Children publication.

Abstract:"This study was designed to determine (a) the demographic characteristics and responsibilities of educational sign language interpreters within the K-12 public school system in the United States; (b) the mode of communication they use most frequently; and (c) their education and certification level. Surveys were completed by 222 educational sign language interpreters in three states [Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska]. Results showed the lack of certification and adequate training for the majority of respondents, as well as inadequate minority/gender representation, among other concerns. The study raised questions about the dependence of students who are deaf or hard of hearing on the educational interpreter support system. Recommendations for educational practice are presented." by Bernhardt Jones, Johnson County Community College; Gary Clark, University of Kansas; and Donald Soltz, University of Colorado.

Mike Yared
Washington, DC

Uploaded by: B.J. Lawrence / Kent State University / Deaf Education Major